welch regt. mg team

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Re: welch regt. mg team

Postby grumpy » 25 Nov 2014 18:53

I know little about the Welsh/Welch, but I am sure that the regular battalions of RWF used Welch as often as they could get away with it, and pretty confident that anything unofficial or demi-official would have the Welch spelling. As an example, both 1st RWF and 2nd RWF Standing Orders [1910-1912] used Welch, as did all internal correspondence.

Perhaps the Welsh regiment were not so fussy in this respect.

I know Frogsmile has, shall we say, an affinity with the RWF, perhaps he can confirm my beliefs?
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Re: welch regt. mg team

Postby jf42 » 25 Nov 2014 19:42

Does 'Welch' essentially have the same heritage as 'Scotch' (no, not talking about whisky)?
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Re: welch regt. mg team

Postby Frogsmile » 25 Nov 2014 20:53

jf42 wrote:Well, I think most fox hounds are are liver and white, aren't - although there's probably some obscure arcane term they use. I didn't mean to suggest they had imported some Belgian mastiffs but, then again, I think it's unlikely you can hitch any old pair of dogs to a cart and expect them to comply. Training, if not breeding, would be fairly important. And, without wishing to flog a dead hound, it would have to be a very decrepit fox hound who would submit to being put in traces. They are bred to run fast and bite, after all. Tricky beasts.

I wonder if local press archives might contain some nuggets hidden away.


Yes you make very good points about the use of hounds and on reflection of what you have said it now seems unlikely to me.

I feel sure that some patient research might well unearth the details of what seems to me to be an organised (formal) experiment by an as yet unknown Welch Regt battalion's Machine Gun Section.
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Re: welch regt. mg team

Postby jf42 » 26 Nov 2014 00:26

For what it is worth, the less than impressive British Newspaper archive search engine turns up nothing under the headings of Welch & Maxim + dog + hound between 1907 and 1914.
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Re: welch regt. mg team

Postby Frogsmile » 26 Nov 2014 01:27

jf42 wrote:Does 'Welch' essentially have the same heritage as 'Scotch' (no, not talking about whisky)?


In short, yes, they are both archaic forms of Scots and Welsh, respectively and in military usage date back to the early 1700s. The 21st and 23rd Regiments used them as part of their title (the 21st side by side with 'North British) when other regiments used only numbers and/or Colonel's names. The 41st did not become Welsh until 1836, but for some reason followed suit.
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Re: welch regt. mg team

Postby Frogsmile » 26 Nov 2014 01:31

jf42 wrote:For what it is worth, the less than impressive British Newspaper archive search engine turns up nothing under the headings of Welch & Maxim + dog + hound between 1907 and 1914.


I think the next stage should be to look for an archived copy of Regimental Records for the 41st/69th and search through.
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