Anglo-Indian Momento of Sam Brownes 22nd Cavalry

For all discussions relating to British military and naval matters of the Edwardian and immediate pre-First World War period, 1901-1914.

Anglo-Indian Momento of Sam Brownes 22nd Cavalry

Postby Atlantia » 29 Jan 2013 15:29

I thought you chaps might enjoy seeing this anglo-Indian steel cigarette box decorated to the 'legendary' Frontier force during it's time as the 22nd Sam Brownes Cavalry (1904-21 I believe).
I love these 'fusion' items.
All comments welcome of course.

Image
User avatar
Atlantia
New Member
 
Posts: 48
Joined: 01 Dec 2011 17:29

Re: Anglo-Indian Momento of Sam Brownes 22nd Cavalry

Postby acanthus » 29 Jan 2013 20:27

Hi,

Nice object! I've seen a pair of metal picture frames decorated in a similar fashion with silver and gold, and although not marked to a Cavalry regiment, they bear the badge of 57th Wildes Rifles (Frontier Force), and the officer who owned them was in India beginning circa 1918, so I'm guessing they could have been made by the same firm who made the cigarette box. It was not un-common in India, for certain firms in particular regions to specialize in making certain products.
acanthus
Senior Member
 
Posts: 368
Joined: 09 Jan 2009 14:35

Re: Anglo-Indian Momento of Sam Brownes 22nd Cavalry

Postby Atlantia » 29 Jan 2013 21:58

acanthus wrote:Hi,

Nice object! I've seen a pair of metal picture frames decorated in a similar fashion with silver and gold, and although not marked to a Cavalry regiment, they bear the badge of 57th Wildes Rifles (Frontier Force), and the officer who owned them was in India beginning circa 1918, so I'm guessing they could have been made by the same firm who made the cigarette box. It was not un-common in India, for certain firms in particular regions to specialize in making certain products.


Hi Acanthus,

Thanks. Those frames sound really nice!
These and similar items do occasionally appear for sale, often as you rightly suggest, this 'style' are often from the same general era.
The quality of the koftgari is very good and is directly comparable in not only style but also form with that which was used to decorate the weapons and other items of previous 'centuries'.
I also particularly like the 'fusion' of cultures in these later pieces.
User avatar
Atlantia
New Member
 
Posts: 48
Joined: 01 Dec 2011 17:29


Return to The Edwardian & Immediate Pre-First World War Period 1901-14

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest