Reserve Rules

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Reserve Rules

Postby cr1tical » 10 Sep 2017 16:26

My man served a 12 year engagement 1899 to 1911, originally 7 and 5 that became 8 and 4. In view of his domestic life post 1911 discharge, the following questions have arisen;

While on the (Sec B) Reserve, would he have had to present himself periodically anywhere?
Was there any rule about not going abroad while on reserve or was it just a case of ensuring the authorities had his address.
On the date his discharge became effective, did he have to present himself anywhere?

There was no sickness or disability so a pension did not arise.

Grateful for help with this one.

Max
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby Frogsmile » 11 Sep 2017 11:47

cr1tical wrote:My man served a 12 year engagement 1899 to 1911, originally 7 and 5 that became 8 and 4. In view of his domestic life post 1911 discharge, the following questions have arisen;

While on the (Sec B) Reserve, would he have had to present himself periodically anywhere?
Was there any rule about not going abroad while on reserve or was it just a case of ensuring the authorities had his address.
On the date his discharge became effective, did he have to present himself anywhere?

There was no sickness or disability so a pension did not arise.

Grateful for help with this one.

Max


1. Having served 8-years he would have had to report just once, in the 10th year, before his obligation for (Sect B) reserve service expired. He could either do a day's musketry training, or attend 6-days training with a special reserve (one time Militia) battalion.

2. I don't think there was a restriction on going abroad, albeit that very few men of the working class would have been able to afford to do so anyway. The key requirement was to always submit an up-to-date address where he could be contacted. For itinerant working men this was often not observed, so it was a constant problem for the authorities.

3. On discharge from colour service a man always received his final, administrative processing at the regimental depot. As the depot was always also the base of any Reserve and Special Reserve battalions, it was especially practical for men who had a 'residual reserve obligation' (as it was known). Even 'time expired' men who returned from foreign service via 'Trooping' (ships) were required to report to the depot for final discharge processing. They usually did so by rail from the port of disembarkation.

N.B. If you mean final discharge from the reserve obligation this could usually be done by post providing that the contact address was up-to-date. Items of uniform retained by reservists were minimal, usually comprising just one working outfit, which they were usually allowed to keep at the end of their service. If a reservist did not report when ordered it was usual for the local police to be requested to call around to the known address.
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby cr1tical » 11 Sep 2017 16:44

Many thanks - belt and braces as you see, very kind of you to take your time to post on both forums (fora??)

One last query - presumably their reserve pay was paid by PO to the address they gave the authorities?? T
the reference to all down the pub on "pension day" in the personal memoire in Muerrisch's post is intriguing.

Max
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby Frogsmile » 11 Sep 2017 17:44

cr1tical wrote:Many thanks - belt and braces as you see, very kind of you to take your time to post on both forums (fora??)

One last query - presumably their reserve pay was paid by PO to the address they gave the authorities?? T
the reference to all down the pub on "pension day" in the personal memoire in Muerrisch's post is intriguing.

Max


In the earlier part of the Victorian era the pension was collected as an annual sum in person from a laid down barracks venue. Once the municipal post office system was successfully established the process was changed so that the money could be collected from local post counters or by postal order to an agreed address.
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