Reserve Rules

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Reserve Rules

Postby cr1tical » 10 Sep 2017 16:26

My man served a 12 year engagement 1899 to 1911, originally 7 and 5 that became 8 and 4. In view of his domestic life post 1911 discharge, the following questions have arisen;

While on the (Sec B) Reserve, would he have had to present himself periodically anywhere?
Was there any rule about not going abroad while on reserve or was it just a case of ensuring the authorities had his address.
On the date his discharge became effective, did he have to present himself anywhere?

There was no sickness or disability so a pension did not arise.

Grateful for help with this one.

Max
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby Frogsmile » 11 Sep 2017 11:47

cr1tical wrote:My man served a 12 year engagement 1899 to 1911, originally 7 and 5 that became 8 and 4. In view of his domestic life post 1911 discharge, the following questions have arisen;

While on the (Sec B) Reserve, would he have had to present himself periodically anywhere?
Was there any rule about not going abroad while on reserve or was it just a case of ensuring the authorities had his address.
On the date his discharge became effective, did he have to present himself anywhere?

There was no sickness or disability so a pension did not arise.

Grateful for help with this one.

Max


1. Having served 8-years he would have had to report just once, in the 10th year, before his obligation for (Sect B) reserve service expired. He could either do a day's musketry training, or attend 6-days training with a special reserve (one time Militia) battalion.

2. I don't think there was a restriction on going abroad, albeit that very few men of the working class would have been able to afford to do so anyway. The key requirement was to always submit an up-to-date address where he could be contacted. For itinerant working men this was often not observed, so it was a constant problem for the authorities.

3. On discharge from colour service a man always received his final, administrative processing at the regimental depot. As the depot was always also the base of any Reserve and Special Reserve battalions, it was especially practical for men who had a 'residual reserve obligation' (as it was known). Even 'time expired' men who returned from foreign service via 'Trooping' (ships) were required to report to the depot for final discharge processing. They usually did so by rail from the port of disembarkation.

N.B. If you mean final discharge from the reserve obligation this could usually be done by post providing that the contact address was up-to-date. Items of uniform retained by reservists were minimal, usually comprising just one working outfit, which they were usually allowed to keep at the end of their service. If a reservist did not report when ordered it was usual for the local police to be requested to call around to the known address.
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby cr1tical » 11 Sep 2017 16:44

Many thanks - belt and braces as you see, very kind of you to take your time to post on both forums (fora??)

One last query - presumably their reserve pay was paid by PO to the address they gave the authorities?? T
the reference to all down the pub on "pension day" in the personal memoire in Muerrisch's post is intriguing.

Max
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby Frogsmile » 11 Sep 2017 17:44

cr1tical wrote:Many thanks - belt and braces as you see, very kind of you to take your time to post on both forums (fora??)

One last query - presumably their reserve pay was paid by PO to the address they gave the authorities?? T
the reference to all down the pub on "pension day" in the personal memoire in Muerrisch's post is intriguing.

Max


In the earlier part of the Victorian era the pension was collected as an annual sum in person from a laid down barracks venue. Once the municipal post office system was successfully established the process was changed so that the money could be collected from local post counters or by postal order to an agreed address.
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby Bushman » 04 Nov 2017 03:22

I note that in 1914 there were quite a number of Imperial Reservists as they were called so presumably these of this post who had migrated to Australia and were noted taking ship (obviously free passage) to return to their units in the UK to rejoin their units
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby Frogsmile » 09 Nov 2017 21:10

Bushman wrote:I note that in 1914 there were quite a number of Imperial Reservists as they were called so presumably these of this post who had migrated to Australia and were noted taking ship (obviously free passage) to return to their units in the UK to rejoin their units


Yes that seems to be the case, although I recall reading that at some point permission was granted whereby reservists who still had an obligation to serve out, were permitted to join one of the many units being raised in the dominions as an alternative to returning to the mother country by ship.
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Re: Reserve Rules

Postby grumpy » 10 Nov 2017 23:36

The Regular Reserve in detail.

Soldiers serving 12 years with the Colours and those granted permission to serve beyond 12 years to pension had no reserve liability. They accounted for about 25% of the infantry each year. The Army Reserve Class I comprised Sections A., B., and D. and the Special Reserve. There had been a C. but it was subsumed into B. On completing colour service a soldier was medically examined, issued with documentation, and entered A. or B.

Section A. was voluntary and limited, each infantry regiment being allowed about 50 men on their books, and the Army total not to exceed 6000. The Section could be called out without Proclamation. These men had to be of “Good” character or better on a scale of: “Exemplary, Very Good, Good, Fair, Indifferent, Bad and Very Bad”. They were selected from those with the best musketry qualifications, were paid full infantry basic pay of 1/- per day, and could remain in the Section for a maximum of two years. There was no provision for continuation training.

Section B. was the normal destination for the balance of the 12 years enlistment, and was on half-pay, paid quarterly. Regarding continuation training: Haldane The Regulations for the training of the Army Reserve are issued annually. In the case of Section B. of the infantry, men enlisted for three years are required to train in the fifth, seventh, ninth, and eleventh year of their service, and those enlisted for more than three years in their tenth year of service. The training consists of one day's musketry instruction, or, if the man so prefers, six days' training with a Special Reserve unit. Hansard 24th August 1909.

Many men found the 6d per day a valuable supplement in hard times, so that when it stopped, aged 30 or so, they volunteered for further reserve liability in Section D, for four years only. Those leaving after 12 years colours service were also eligible. The authorities used D. as a shock absorber, opening it to enrolment subject to medical examination only when reserves were scarce. It was closed for infantry for eight months from 1st October 1906 and for 18 months from 1st June 1908. The quarterly payment was substantial, and, if one were so minded, paid for a great deal of beer at 3d per pint. Frank Richards in his Old Soldier Sahib: In 1912 I extended my service for another four years on the Reserve. I little thought when I did so that two years later I should be called back to the Colours to rejoin my old Battalion again. Every quarter-day, or pen¬sion-day as it was called, a number of us reservists and service pension wallahs would have a day off from our work to spend it together in the Castle Hotel. There was provision for one day of continuation training.

Section D. was a cause of controversy. It was not supposed to be employed until A. and B. had been used up, and had been until recently part of the Army Reserve Class II. Some men would be as long as 16 years from enlistment. These would be unused to modern tactics and organisation, unaccustomed to marching under loads and unfamiliar with their officers. They had attracted much adverse comment after service in the Boer War. Hansard 4th May 1911: The Duke of Bedford. The men comprising ... Section D ... were found by Lord Methuen and Sir T. Kelly-Kenny during the South African war to be unfit for active service. ... Why, if these Section D men were found unfit for active service in South Africa, should they now be considered fit for active service at a moment's notice with the Expeditionary Force in Europe and elsewhere? The noble Viscount (Haldane) knows that the reason why the men ... proved unsatisfactory in South Africa was due to the length of their absence from the Colours. I must remind the noble Viscount that whereas the men found ... unfit for immediate active service abroad had been absent from the Colours from five to nine years, the men now relied upon by the noble Viscount to complete his Expeditionary Force will have been absent from the Colours from nine to thirteen years. The noble Viscount must be aware that he is counting upon men who will be the product of the three years with the Colours and nine with the Reserve term of enlistment, and that consequently the unfitness complained of by Lord Methuen and Sir T. Kelly-Kenny will be not only intensified but in some cases more than doubled.
The Duke did not receive an answer to this question.
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