John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

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John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby Mary74 » 03 Nov 2014 11:47

Private John Flinn was killed in an ambush at Tataraimaka 4 May 1863. This is in the Taranaki area in New Zealand. The incident occurred because officialdom did not heed warnings published in the local paper in New Zealand that it could happen if soldiers or settlers moved through a particular area. A group of soldiers were sent back to base with a prisoner, and several men died as a result.

One of the men was John Flinn. I want to find out more about him, eg his earlier life. His death was registered in New Zealand but the record shows nothing of use. There were at least three men called John Flynn in the 57th, but this one used the spelling Flinn for his name which could distinguish him from the others. His wife and family stayed in New Zealand after he was killed. One daughter, Susanna, was born in 1858, in Malta. John was 45 when he was killed.

The interesting thing is that about ten years after the ambush, a Maori man bought goods in a store, and paid for them with what he thought wasa coin. It was, in fact, a medal commemorating the service of John Flinn in the Turkish Campaign. The shop owner accepted it and then offered it to family for the price of the goods. So, of course, we now know John Flinn's number. It was 1634.

Now what do I do with that number to find out about him? I have read through the official records which I recently stumbled into online. I found some reference to my Allen officer relatives, but next to nothing about rank and file men. Where else can I go? The name John Flynn/Flinn is incredibly numerous and I can't really cope with 14000 hits to an enquiry. It is so hard when you don't have a place of origin. Where would the enrolment details for ordinary soldiers in the 57th be held please?

I suspect that John Flinn would be Irish. I have found all of the ships used to bring the 57th and families to New Zealand, but of course the rank and file or families' names are not recorded. I wonder if the usual embarkation records were kept for soldiers or their families, and where they would be?

It was wonderful to find so much detail about the 57th on this site recently, and that is the reason that I have joined up.
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby colsjt65 » 03 Nov 2014 20:57

He was a member of the party that was famously killed in an unprovoked ambush (during 'peacetime') with the loss of two officers and 6 men of the 57th. This incident precipitated a punitive attack at Katikara a month later, and was seen as a casus belli for the invasion of the Waikato a month after that.

Many years later, Lt. Colonel Gorton (57th Regt. ret.), in his book Some Home Truths re the New Zealand war claims that Governor Grey was aware of the danger, as the ambush had been set up to kill himself and General Cameron, who regularly rode that route, however he didn't warn anyone else.

Here is the account in the Taranaki newspaper The Taranaki Herald. of 9 May 1863 [ Available online at the New Zealand National Library's "Papers Past" - http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast]

Monday, 4th May 1863. - This day will be as long remembered as Tuesday, the 27th March, 1860, when five of our settlers were shot down and tomahawked while peaceably following their several vocations on the Omata road. To-day we have to chronicle the murder of eight more of our fellow countrymen under circumstances as horrible as those which attended the death of Messrs. Ford, Shaw, Passmore, and the two little boys. At about 10 o'clock this morning the inhabitants of New Plymouth were thrown into a state of great excitement by the arrival in town of Ropata Ngarongomate from Poutoko with the intelligence that the natives had attacked a party of the 57th Regiment on their way to town from Tataraimaka. The General, who was on his way to Poutoko, with Colonel Warr (sic), and who met Ropata, hastened on, and was soon after followed by the Governor, and his Excellency had not long left town when his A.D.C., Capt. Bulkeley, gallopped back to announce to the Colonial Secretary that several soldiers had been shot. The excitement of the townspeople reached its height, when confirmatory tidings came in town by more than one horseman, on reeking horses, that no less than six men and two officers had been waylaid and shot down by an ambuscade of natives on the beach near Wairau, between the Oakura river and the Tataraimaka block, exactly in the same place as that occupied by the central party we mentioned last week. Some time elapsed before particulars of the murder reached town, and we gathered the following, which we believe to be reliable: — A party of the commissariat Transport Corps, with two drays and twelve bullocks, with supplies, were on their way to Tataraimaka, and having crossed the Oakura river heard the report of a volley of small arms, and saw the smoke of the pieces some half a mile before them. They saw that a party of soldiers and two horsemen (who proved to be officers) were attacked and saw some of them fall, when they immediately abandoned their carts and hastened back to the Poutoko and gave information of what they had seen. Captain Shortt, with a party of 30 men only from the Redoubt at Poutoko, were the first to arrive at the spot, followed shortly afterwards by Colonel Warre, and it was their mournful task to gather the bodies of the following officers and men savagely murdered:—
Asst. Surgeon W. A. Hope, M.B.
Lieut. T H. Tragett, 57th Regt.
Color-Sergeant Samuel Ellers, 57th Regt.
Sergeant Samuel Hill,
Private Edward Kelly,
John Flynn,
Bartholomew Macarthy,
Wm. Banks,

They were on their way, on military duty, to town from Tataraimaka, and apparently had been shot down without a moment's notice. The bodies were all horribly mutilated, and those of the officers stripped of nearly all their clothes. One of the drays was found were (sic) the escort had left it, but the other had been driven off, which contained a quantity of flour, potatoes, and groceries. The other dray was subsequently seen being driven up to Kaitake, on the spur of the ranges. Dr. Hope's horse had gallopped towards town and was caught by the escort. This fearful tragedy cast a deep gloom over the whole settlement. Dr. Hope was rising in his profession, and had only lately received a staff appointment. Lieut. Tragett was a B.A., and the only son, we believe, of the Rev. T. H. Tragett, of Romsey, Hampshire, England. This gentleman was a great favorite in his regiment, and his untimely and fearful end is deeply and poignantly felt by his brother officers. The two sergeants and the privates were good and gallant men, and their loss will be no less felt by their comrades; one "who knew them well said — "There were not six better men in the regiment." Sergeant Ellers was the senior Color Sergeant in the regiment, and Kelly had five medals. Precautions were immediately taken in town for the safety of its inhabitants. The alarm guns were fired from Marsland Hill, and messengers were despatched into the country to bring into town all who were out on their farms and at work in the bush. A Gazette was published calling out the Militia for actual service, and warning people not to go beyond the Omata Stockade. At nightfall 200 Volunteers and Militia were told off for duty at the blockhouses and for patrols, and at 7 p.m. were marched off to their respective posts. The military in garrison were marched off for particular service, and the Mounted Artillery Corps told off for duty during the night. His Excellency the Governor and the General returned to town in the afternoon; and late in the evening the bodies of the murdered men arrived, and were conveyed to the hospital.

Tuesday, 5th May. — Military movements have been made to-day at the Poutoko redoubt, and the troops have marched to Oakura and taken up a position on native land, where they are constructing a redoubt. No natives have been seen. An inquest on the bodies sat to-day, at the Military Hospital, and, after hearing the evidence of several witnesses, adjourned to Thursday next, when evidence from Tataraimaka of some who are supposed to have escaped back to the camp will be heard. No communication has been had with Tataraimaka. A few people have been permitted to-day to view the bodies of the murdered men, which present a most horrible spectacle. The following is a description of the wounds given by Dr. Mackinnon, the medical witness on the inquest: —

Staff- Assistant Surgeon W. A. Hope, M.B., Gunshot wound through right shoulder, penetrating both lungs as far back as left side near the spine, where ball remains under skin; tomahawk cut over left side of head, and deep spear wound through face and upper jaw.

Lieut. T. H. Tragett, 57th Regt.—Gunshot wound through right side of chest, bullet found under body this morning; gunshot wound through left thigh — no other wound.

Color-Sergeant Samuel Ellers, 57th Regt. — shot through head and speared through abdomen.

Sergeant Samuel Hill, 57th Regt. — gunshot wound through right side of abdomen, both arms smashed by bullets, ball through head, the integuments of right side of same all burnt by powder, the muzzle of gun must have been held close to the part; head tomahawked and speared through as well.

Private Edward Kelly, 57th Regt. — Shot through both thighs and abdomen; head gashed completely open in front and behind by tomahawk; another deep tomahawk cut across left hand at wrist.

Private Bartholomew McCarthy, 57th Regt. — Shot through right hip, two tomahawk cuts over forehead; back of right side of head speared.

Private John Flynn, 57th Regt,— Shot through right arm and same side of chest, and through left forearm and thigh, and gunshot wound on right side of head, penetrating brain; musket must have been held close to head.

Private William Banks, 57th Regt. — Shot through right knee and left thigh; four terrible tomahawk cuts through back and right side of head; index finger of right hand all but severed, as also middle one, by tomahawk; the man has evidently raised his hand to protect his head.

Mr. Tragett must have died instantly, but Dr. Hope, from the appearance of his countenance, struggled hard with his brutal assailants. There is no doubt that all were shot down by the first volley, and those who were not killed outright were at once dispatched with the tomahawk or its spear handle. Several natives from the North in town today. Mr Tragett's horse was so badly hurt, his leg being broken by a bullet, he was shot. The natives account for the murders of yesterday, that the Southern natives having found that Waireka and Tataraimaka have been occupied by the troops in spite of their word that it should not be, and having waited in vain for signs from the tribes, and being whakama (ashamed), determined to begin themselves and endeavour to bring about a war in that manner. It is said, however, that the bulk of the natives will consider their proceeding a kohuru, i.e., murder, and will not assist them, which remains to be seen. The families outside the town have come into town to-day, and the Bell Block settlers moving into the stockade. The entire white population are now within the line of blockhouses.

Wednesday, 6th May. — This morning at 10 o'clock the Militia and Volunteers paraded on Poverty-square for inspection by Major- General Cameron. He addressed them as follows: — "I have called you together to-day to express to you my gratification in having you under my command. I feel quite sure you will do your duty as soldiers and be obedient to orders. The number of men required for the blockhouses and patrols has made the duty severe; but I hope shortly to have reinforcements, when your present, press of duty will be lessened. I see that some of you will want some drill, and you will have to attend parades pretty often in order that you may become efficient men in the field." There was a good muster of the Militia and Volunteers, and arms and ammunition were served out to those who were not supplied with them. The duties for the night having been told off, the men were dismissed. No news from Tataraimaka. A native in a red coat and a gun with a bayonet fixed (no doubt one of the rifles taken from the murdered men) is to be seen daily on guard at Kaitake on the spur of the ranges. Two muskets were fired last night between the Poutoko and the redoubt at Oakura, no doubt from prowling natives. The Abeona, from Raglan arrived to-day. The captain reports that the Upper Waikatos had driven off all the Europeans, had taken all the native women and half-caste children living with Europeans, and that 600 Waikatos had left for Taranaki, after expressing their intention to fight and slaughter immediately on their arrival in Taranaki. Immediately this was known, a deputation of settlers waited on the Native Minister, Mr Bell, who asked him if it was true that the Government intended to take into their confidence those natives who have been hitherto in arms against us, such as Tamihana and others, and urged the Government to forbid all intercourse with the natives within the lines, thus preventing any treachery and the spread of information to the enemy. Mr Bell informed the deputation that he would see his colleagues on the subject, and requested them to see him again shortly.

More gruesome detail from the coroner's inquest - [TH 13 May]
Private Kelly (sole survivor) deposed- "I turned round and saw Private Flynn doing nothing; asked him why he did not load and fire; he told me he was not able — his left, arm was broke by a shot I then told Lieut. Tragett to take Private Flinn's accoutrements and firelock and commence firing; he had no arms himself hadn't Lieut. Tragett.

Also a mention later [TH in December 63] - Presentation of Medals for Good Conduct. — At a general parade of the 57th Regiment on the 9th instant, medals for long and meritorious service were presented by Colonel Warre, 57th Regt. C.B., to the following men: — Sergeant William Bosworth, with a gratuity of £10; Private Charles Ansford, John Kibble, William Turk, and William Worsley, with the regulated gratuity of £5 each. There was also a medal for late Private Flynn (murdered at Wairau) which was given to his widow. At the same time the Coroner of the Jury (J. Flight, Esq.,) which sat at the inquest upon the murdered officers and men on the 4th of May last, presented Florence Kelly, the sole survivor of the Wairau massacre, with a gold medal, with the following inscription:
Last edited by colsjt65 on 03 Nov 2014 23:54, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby Frogsmile » 03 Nov 2014 23:43

A fascinating story. I hope that other forum members might be able to help with further advice and or information. It seems as if both spellings were used for Flynn / Flinn.
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby Mary74 » 04 Nov 2014 02:00

The inquest into the incident is also recorded in New Zealand Newspapers. I don't have the references by me, but the army was considered careless, I believe. It received a great deal of attention by nervous New Zealanders on both sides.

The issue arose over a quarrel about land and also because the Governor delayed taking action about it, or the wrong action. Men died because of something that could have been solved.

The men were buried with all military honours, but later, in 1909, they were disinterred and then reinterred in quite a big ceremony at New Plymouth. Two graveyards were involved. John Flinn was interred in the Roman Catholic one. New Zealand newspapers also covered this in some detail, even naming members of John Flinn's family.

The name Flinn is the one that was used for his death registration.

The medal that was recovered ten years later was the size of a half crown.

The name Flinn has taken many forms, this being quite an old version, without the Irish O, and modern names like Lynn, Fallon, Fling, Fleming, and their other variants are also found frequently in Irish records. The form only depended on whether you could spell or not at the time, or whether the family had become separated by distance from the core family. I have just found the name Fleming used as an alternative spelling on a legal document in my own Flinn family back in 1872. It all depends on the strength of the Irish accent of the time, I suppose.

Thank you for the detailed responses. That makes my search very enjoyable.

Mary
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby crimea1854 » 04 Nov 2014 21:01

Mary

The Turkish Medal might have been the medal instituted by the Sultan of Turkey and awarded with the Crimea Medal. These medals were issued unnamed, so if it had his Regt. number then he must have had his privately engraved.

Flinn/Flynn is on the Crimea Medal roll, shown with clasps for 'Inkerman' and 'Balaclava' and possibly 'Alma', but this is a little unclear, although the 57th took part in the battle. Almost certainly he would have also received the 'Sebastopol' clasp, all earned while with the 57th.

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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby Mary74 » 06 Nov 2014 10:21

crimea1854 wrote:Mary

The Turkish Medal might have been the medal instituted by the Sultan of Turkey and awarded with the Crimea Medal. These medals were issued unnamed, so if it had his Regt. number then he must have had his privately engraved.

Flinn/Flynn is on the Crimea Medal roll, shown with clasps for 'Inkerman' and 'Balaclava' and possibly 'Alma', but this is a little unclear, although the 57th took part in the battle. Almost certainly he would have also received the 'Sebastopol' clasp, all earned while with the 57th.

Martin


Hello Martin.

Where can I see the Crimea Medal roll? All I know about the medal John Flinn won was from a newspaper article, and how the shopkeeper described it.

I'm a bit ignorant about the locations of all of the actual battles fought, and they have been just words to me until now. It is amazing to have had three ancestors involved in possibly the same battles. I will do some study of them.

This man has been an incredibly difficult one to track, but I am discovering that the more I search, the more things seem to fall into place on their own. I mean that I struggle for ages, gathering notes, and then, one day many of them seem to slot together almost by accident.

Thank you for the information.
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby DebbieG » 07 Apr 2015 01:32

Hi Mary,

I am also trying to find more information on John Flynn.

I would especially like to get hold of a photograph.

I wanted to check with you on his daughter Susannah Flynn, I have that she was born in India 1855. You mentioned she was born in Malta, I was wondering if you had more information on that.

Thanks Debbie
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby EllenSmith » 24 Jan 2017 09:45

Hello,

I was wondering if anyone had any more information regarding John Flynn?

Thank you
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby Frogsmile » 14 Feb 2017 23:35

EllenSmith wrote:Hello,

I was wondering if anyone had any more information regarding John Flynn?

Thank you


Ellen you might succeed in getting a reply if you go into each posters profile and send them a private message and/or email. Good luck.
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby Rural53 » 02 Mar 2017 07:23

Mary, above, referred to the internment of John Flynn's remains. Here is a transcript of the Friday 15 January 1909 Taranaki Herald article on the event.

HONOURED DEAD.
REMOVAL OF VETERANS' REMAINS.
A PATHETIC CEREMONY .
As briefly stated yesterday, the remains of a score or so of victims of the Maori wars were transferred from the old Catholic burial ground, Courtenay Street, to Te Henui Cemetery, for internment. For some considerable time it had been felt that something should be done whereby the graves of these old veterans should be better cared for, and four or five years ago Mr W. T. Jennings, M.P., brought the matter to the neglected state of the graves before Parliament, with the result that several sums of money were obtained for effecting improvements. Steps were then taken to have collected the remains of all those who fell in the wars in and around this district, with a view to interring them in one section of Te Henui Cemetery. Yesterday's ceremony was very impressive. The work of exhuming the bodies has occupied several days, and much care has been exercised by the workmen engaged — Messrs J. Tuohy (in charge), S. Brooks, J. Conway (a member of tho 63th Regiment), J. M'Coy, and T. Tuohy. The remains of twenty-one persons were recovered, and in several instances the coffin plates were more or less intact, making identification possible, whilst in others nothing remained by which identity could be traced.

THE FUNERAL CORTEGE.
The funeral cortege left the Courtenay Street burial ground shortly after 2.30.

THE REMAINS
The remains were placed in four coffins as follows: — Coffin No. E. Casey and three others, unknown. Coffin No. 2 — Arthur Hassett, died May 22, 1809, aged 31 years; Patrick Scully, died March 22. '1862. aged 26 years. Three others, no records. Coffin No. 3 — Surgeon McAndrew, 57th Regiment, died September 21, 1861, aged 38 ; Sergeant Peter Fahey. late 63th Regiment and Taranaki Militia, first man to fall in action (shot through forehead) at battle of Waireka, March 28, 1860; Private John Flynn. 57th Regiment, aged 43, killed at Wairau (Taranaki) massacre, May 4. 1863; Private Patrick McCarthy, 57th Regiment, aged 27, killed at Wairau massacre, May 4. 1863; Private Edward Kelly, 57th Regiment, killed at Wairau massacre, May 4, 1863. Coffin No. 4 — Private Connell, 57th Regiment, died March 6, 1862. aged 25. death from natural causes ; Private John McQuire, died July 17, 1861, aged 21 years; Private McLaughlin, 65th Regiment, died May. 5, 1862, aged 29 years ; W. Taylor, no records, and three others unknown.

A pathetic sight met one's gaze as thirty veterans under the command of Captain Standish — men now so advanced in years that many of them found a difficulty in walking — slowly wended their way to the cemetery. A large number of citizens were also associated with the veterans.

AT TE HENUI CEMETERY.
On arrival at Te Henui Cemetery the veterans — some of whom had taken part in the hostilities with the deceased soldiers — acted as bearers. There were those present who had seen service in the Crimean War and Indian Mutiny, as well as in the New Zealand wars. The Very Rev. Dean M'Kenna officiated at the graveside, and after the service paid a tribute to the memory of the departed soldiers. Bugler J. H. Walker, of Waitara, also spoke.

VETERANS PRESENT
Among the veterans present were the following : — Captain Standish. Taranaki Rifles, and vice-president Veterans, New Plymouth.
Captain I. Bayly, New Plymouth. Private T. Allen. New Zealand Volunteers, Avenue Road, New Plymouth.
Private W. Billing, New Zealand Volunteers. New Plymouth.
Private T. Furlong, 57th Regiment, full honours Crimean War, New Plymouth.
Sergeant Duffin, late 57th Regiment, four medals and three clasps, Balaclava, Inkerman, and Sebastopol, New Plvmonth.
Private W. King, late 65th Regiment, New Plymouth.
Private T. Inch. New Zealand Militia, New Plymouth. Private C. Honeyfield, Taranaki Volunteers. New Plymouth.
Bugler J. H. Walker, Wellington Rifles and Kaiwarra Volunteers, Waitara.
Lieut. M. Carrick, Taranaki Volunteers. New Plymouth.
Colour-Sergeant G. Bertrand, Taranaki Volunteers, Urenui.
Sergeant W. H. Free, Taranaki Volunteers, New Plymouth. Captain T. Wilson, Taranaki Militia, New Plymouth.
Corporal W. Bell, 21st Hussars, New Plymouth.
Private Way, 70th Regiment, New Plymouth.
Private E. T. Morshead, Taranaki Volunteers, New Plymouth.
Private M Gillicuddy, 57th Regiment, New Plymouth.
Sergeant W. H. Pearn, Taranaki Volunteers. New Plymouth.
Private Moon, Taranaki Volunteers, New Plymouth.
Private Northcote. Taranaki Volunteers. New Plymouth.
Private T. Langman, Taranaki Volunteers, Waitara.
Private J. Kenyon, Taranaki Volunteers. New Plymouth.
Private R. Langman. Taranaki Volunteers, New Plymouth.
Lieut. J. C. Davies, Taranaki Volunteers. New Plymouth.
Private C. F. Crawford, Taranaki Militia. New Plymouth .
Bugler J. Mynott, 43rd Regiment, New Plymouth.
Captain J. Black, Taranaki Volunteers and secretary Veterans Association, New Plymouth.
Lieut. R. Wells, Taranaki Volunteers. Waitara.
John Stapeleton, A.C., New Plymouth.

RELATIVES
Among the relatives present were Mr J. Elliot, of New Plymouth, a direct descendant of John Flynn, one of the victims of the Wairau massacre on May 4 1863 (Mrs George Thomas, of Te Kiri. is a daughter of John Flynn): Mr W. Walsh, of New Plymouth : and Mr Sam Hill (whose uncle Sergeant |Hill, was also massacred at Wairau).


THE WAIRAI MASSACRE.
It will no doubt be of interest in our readers to refer briefly to the Wairau massacre. The Herald of May 8. 1863, in it's Journal of Events, said:— Monday. May 4, 1863: This day will be as long remembered as Tuesday, the 27th March, 1860, when five of our settlers were shot down and tomahawked while peaceably following their several vocations on the Omata road. To-day we have to chronicle the murder of eight more of our fellow countrymen under circumstances as horrible as those which attended the death of Messrs. Ford, Shaw, Passmore, and the two little boys. At about 10 o'clock this morning the inhabitants of New Plymouth were thrown into a state of great excitement by the arrival in town of Ropata Ngarongomate from Poutoko with the intelligence that the natives had attacked a party of the 57th Regiment on their way to town from Tataraimaka. The General, who was on his way to Poutoko, with Colonel Warr, and who met Ropata, hastened on, and was soon after followed by the Governor, and his Excellency had not long left town when his A.D.C., Capt. Bulkeley, gallopped back to announce to the Colonial Secretary that several soldiers had .been shot. The excitement of the townspeople reached its height, when confirmatory tidings came in town by more than one horseman, on reeking horses, that no less than six men and two officers had been waylaid and shot down by an ambuscade of natives on the beach near Wairau, between the Oakura river and the Tataraimaka block, Some time elapsed before particulars of the murder reached town, and we gathered the following, which we believe to be reliable: — A party of the Commissariat Transport Corps with two drays and twelve bullock-, with supplies were on their way to Tatnraimaksi, and having crossed the Oakura River, heard the report of a volley of small arms, and saw the smoke of the pieces some half-mile before them. They saw that a party of soldiers and two horsemen (who proved to be officers) were attacked, and saw some of them fall, when they immediately abandoned their carts and hastened back to the Poutoko and gave information of what - they had seen. Captain Short with a party of 30 men only from the Redoubt at Poutoko were the first to arrive at the spot, followed shortly afterwards by Colonel Wane, and it was their mournful task to gather, the bodies of the following officers and men, savagely murdered :
Assistant Surgeon Hope, M P., and Lieutenant, T. H. Tragett,
Colour-Sergeant Samuel Ellers,'
Sergeant Samuel Hill,
Privates E. Kelly, John Flynn, Bartholomew (Patrick), Macarthy. and W. Banks, all of the 57th Regiment.

The party was escorting a prisoner, the man named Wm. Banks (already mentioned), for court-martial to New Plymouth, and knowing nothing of, the warnings which had been given to the Government that the Natives had laid ambuscades, they marched on regardless of danger. The officers passed the party and, proceeded at a walking pace about two hundred yards in advance, halting at the Wairau Stream to allow the party to come up. As the party approached a shot was suddenly fired. It was at first, thought that the party had discharged the shot by accident, but they were quickly undeceived when a second shot laid low Colour-Sergeant Ellers, and immediately after Sergeant Hill fell. Simultaneously the whole party, with the exception of Private F. Kelly, was laid low. Private Kelly's statement as telegraphed to the Herald from Tataraimaka was as follows: —“ I was one of the escort that left Tataraimaka. When we got to the Wairau Stream we were fired at from the scrub about twenty yards from us. Dr. Hope and Sergeants Ellers and Hill fell. Returned fire and extended. We were then surrounded by about thirty Maoris. At last only three of us left alive. Went to the sandhill with a flag of truce; no notice taken of it. Came back: found Mr. Tragett dead and Private Kelly badly wounded. Retired firing, followed some distance by the Maoris. Hide and was pick up by the party from Tataraimaka."

Source: https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/taranaki-herald/1909/1/15/5
Original May 8. 1863 article at https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18630509.2.11

I've looked in the New Plymouth Cemetery online search http://www.newplymouthnz.com/Residents/Facilities-and-Services/Cemeteries-and-Crematorium/Cemetery-Search for all the men listed as reinterned in the article and i can not find any of them.

Edit: The transcript is a text recognition of the original scanned newspaper, edited to correct obvious mistakes, so I can not guarantee the accuracy. The list of veterans present has some interesting characters.
Last edited by Rural53 on 03 Mar 2017 04:33, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: John Flinn, killed in New Zealand Land Wars 1863

Postby Frogsmile » 02 Mar 2017 21:15

Perhaps you can PM the details to Ellen too, as she is a new member and might not revisit the forum unless she gets a reminder.
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