Dishcharge Certificate

Section for new members to introduce themselves and get tips and advice on how to get the best out of the forum.

Dishcharge Certificate

Postby Brian Collins » 25 Feb 2016 18:06

Hi, I am a new member and wondered if I could get an answer to a couple of questions.
Going through some old papers of a long lost friend I came across a ‘Soldiers Small Book’ of his uncles Albert Atkins of the 2nd Northampton Regiment who died in the 1st World War and in a pocket of the book was an original ‘Parchment Certificate of Discharge’ for Albert’s father John Atkins 591. 2Batt. 29th Brigade, Northamptonshire Regiment on 19th May 1877 and transferred to the Reserves in 31st May1883 finally discharged 3rd June 1889.
In the Medals Section I can read Zulu War and other words that I cannot decipher and a date like 1879, the 9 is not very clear, according to another letter from the Royal Hospital Chelsea he received a ‘Special Campaign Pension’.
My question is why did he receive a pension for a particular campaign and where was he discharged from as the place was called something like ‘ Diefermantzburg’ ,also why is there a number 29 above his army number.?
Out of interest in the 1st World War he was with the RASC Att. to 12 Mountain Battery RGA, I believe in the Territorials as his number then was T/390082.
Brian Collins
New Member
 
Posts: 3
Joined: 21 Feb 2016 16:01

Re: Dishcharge Certificate

Postby almaboy » 26 Feb 2016 01:59

Hi Brian and welcome to the VWF.

To answer some of your questions:
Prior to 1881 the 2nd Bttn Northamptonshire Regiment was the 58th Rutlandshire Regt. The Childers Reforms amalgamated the 48th Northamptonshire and the 58th and they were re-designated as the 1st and 2nd Battalions Northamptonshire Regt respectively. As such they were part of the 29th Brigade, hence the 29 prefix to Pte John Atkins service number.

Pte 29/591 John Atkins was serving with the 58th in April 1879 when it embarked for South Africa to take part in the Zulu War. As a result he received the South Africa General Service medal (Zulu War medal) without a bar, for his service there.
Subsequently the 58th Foot served in the disastrous 1st Anglo Boer War of 1881, where the Regt was virtually annihilated. Pte Atkins appears to be one of the lucky survivors.

It looks like he was discharged at Pietermaritzburg in South Africa shortly after, probably having served the term of his short service commission (six years) and returned to England. The parchment certificate you have would have been presented by him in order to draw his soldiers pension.

Tony
almaboy
New Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: 15 Feb 2009 17:29

Re: Dishcharge Certificate

Postby 95th » 26 Feb 2016 08:31

Hello and welcome Brian
95th
New Member
 
Posts: 34
Joined: 17 Feb 2016 14:02

Re: Dishcharge Certificate

Postby Brian Collins » 26 Feb 2016 13:57

Thanks Tony .That is very interesting, I shall see if there are any more papers I know he died in 1933, I new his daughter from Stamford, she was a nurse in WW1. Would he have had a medal for the Boar War?
Brian
Brian Collins
New Member
 
Posts: 3
Joined: 21 Feb 2016 16:01

Re: Dishcharge Certificate

Postby almaboy » 26 Feb 2016 14:52

Hi Brian

Small world, I was born in Stamford! Live just over the border now in Gods Little Acre.

Anyway, in answer to your question, no, he never got a medal for his involvement in the 1st Boer War. It was such an unmitigated disaster for the British that the Government of the day decided it was best to forget about the entire episode, so a medal was never sanctioned.

The 58th did win 2 VC's there, the only two the regiment ever received. One was bought by Lord Ashcroft last year and is now on display at the IWM as part of his collection (Lt Alan Hill).

I recommend 'Hill of Destiny' by Ian Castle, in the Osprey series of publications. It gives a very good account of the whole 1st Boer War.

Tony.
almaboy
New Member
 
Posts: 60
Joined: 15 Feb 2009 17:29


Return to New Members

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest