1890 Grenadier Guards 'Mutiny' (and others)

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Re: 1890 Grenadier Guards 'Mutiny' (and others)

Postby The Seeker » 13 Jun 2017 11:32

Hello again,
The reference to M company at Treherbert is borne out by the below, as I found these items in the Welsh Newspaper Archive;

South Wales Daily News, 9th June 1891;
The Treherbert detachment (M Company) consists of 151 trained volunteers and 7 recruits. The brass band is a strong one too. The corps was established about 9 years ago and has been, for past years, under the captaincy of Mr. A.L. Lewis, manager of the Ynysyfeio Collieries. It is said that this company is the strongest single one in the battalion. Acting Surgeon Warburton, Lieutenant Williams and Lieutenant Richards have been for years most faithful officers and are much admired by the men, most of whom are colliers. Sergeant-Instructor Keeley says that he has experienced no difficulty whatever in training the miners, among whom, it appears, there are some crack shots.

Evening Express, 21st April, 1894;
The annual meeting of the Bute Detachment of M Company, 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment was held on Thursday night. The Company mustered strongly at the Drill-Hall, and then, in command of Captain Lewis and Lieutenant D. Williams, marched to the Dunraven Hotel, where a substantial supper was prepared by Mr. and Mrs. Richards (host and hostess). After doing justice to the good things prepared by Mr. and Mrs. Richards, the prizes for shooting were distributed by Captain Lewis.

I can vouch for the location, as I was born and raised in Treherbert and lived next door to the Dunraven Hotel. M Company was affiliated to an Army Barracks at Pentre (2 miles down the valley), where an uncle was stationed. The Bute reference may have been where they met, as the Bute Colliery was local. There is little open-ground within the village which could have been used as a marshalling area for training but on the undeveloped side of the railway was the approach to the collieries and there was sufficient open-ground to do so. There was also easy access to ground for shooting practice.

Obtaining a copy of the Grenadiers' Service record has enabled me to complete a missing chapter in my Family tree and given some insight into the military connections of my home village which I was entirely unaware of.

Ben
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Re: 1890 Grenadier Guards 'Mutiny' (and others)

Postby Frogsmile » 17 Jun 2017 16:21

The Seeker wrote:Hello again,
The reference to M company at Treherbert is borne out by the below, as I found these items in the Welsh Newspaper Archive;

South Wales Daily News, 9th June 1891;
The Treherbert detachment (M Company) consists of 151 trained volunteers and 7 recruits. The brass band is a strong one too. The corps was established about 9 years ago and has been, for past years, under the captaincy of Mr. A.L. Lewis, manager of the Ynysyfeio Collieries. It is said that this company is the strongest single one in the battalion. Acting Surgeon Warburton, Lieutenant Williams and Lieutenant Richards have been for years most faithful officers and are much admired by the men, most of whom are colliers. Sergeant-Instructor Keeley says that he has experienced no difficulty whatever in training the miners, among whom, it appears, there are some crack shots.

Evening Express, 21st April, 1894;
The annual meeting of the Bute Detachment of M Company, 3rd Battalion, Welsh Regiment was held on Thursday night. The Company mustered strongly at the Drill-Hall, and then, in command of Captain Lewis and Lieutenant D. Williams, marched to the Dunraven Hotel, where a substantial supper was prepared by Mr. and Mrs. Richards (host and hostess). After doing justice to the good things prepared by Mr. and Mrs. Richards, the prizes for shooting were distributed by Captain Lewis.

I can vouch for the location, as I was born and raised in Treherbert and lived next door to the Dunraven Hotel. M Company was affiliated to an Army Barracks at Pentre (2 miles down the valley), where an uncle was stationed. The Bute reference may have been where they met, as the Bute Colliery was local. There is little open-ground within the village which could have been used as a marshalling area for training but on the undeveloped side of the railway was the approach to the collieries and there was sufficient open-ground to do so. There was also easy access to ground for shooting practice.

Obtaining a copy of the Grenadiers' Service record has enabled me to complete a missing chapter in my Family tree and given some insight into the military connections of my home village which I was entirely unaware of.

Ben


Ben, the information that you have discovered now confirms your ancestor's unit as the 3rd (Volunteer) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment, as opposed to the 3rd (Militia) Battalion, which existed at the same time. We know this because only the volunteers paraded at local drill halls that were set up for weekly use. Conversely, militia soldiers only reported annually, or when mobilised ('embodied'), whereupon they all reported to their battalion headquarters. You might like to learn more about the existence of local drill halls at the following links:

1. http://research.historicengland.org.uk/ ... 20Overview

2. http://www.drillhalls.org

3. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.u ... /c/F219405

4. http://royalwelsh.org.uk/downloads/S02- ... 5-1908.pdf

N.B. It seems likely that M Company first met at the Drill Hall built in the Penyrenglyn part of Treherbert in the mid-1890s, but had moved to Pentre by 1906.
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