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The steam navy and quarterdecks.

PostPosted: 10 Jan 2018 14:24
by Josh&Historyland
Being somewhat ignorant of the progress of naval architecture after the Napoleonic Wars I found the piratically straight sweep of the screw frigate Euryalus' deck a little alien. http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collection ... 66061.html
Would anybody know why the quarterdeck was dispensed with, and wether the term was retained for the rear quarter of the deck where the captain usually took his post?

Josh.

Re: The steam navy and quarterdecks.

PostPosted: 11 Jan 2018 21:07
by Josh&Historyland
Perhaps my question can be refined to the particulars of this photograph. Pardon the lack of a link but the website doesn't have the image anymore, that I can find. But if I can persuade someone to Google 'image of japan shimonoseki 1864' look for the Granger watermark over a shot of a group of seamen and officers at the helm of a ship.
The officers seem to be standing on a narrow bridge raised over the helm. I'm not quite sure of the details about it, or whether all ships had them, the model, (see first link) doesn't include it.

Josh.

Re: The steam navy and quarterdecks.

PostPosted: 19 Jan 2018 07:27
by ED, in Los Angeles
Josh&Historyland wrote:Perhaps my question can be refined to the particulars of this photograph.
The officers seem to be standing on a narrow bridge raised over the helm. I'm not quite sure of the details about it, or whether all ships had them, the model, (see first link) doesn't include it.

Josh.

Here is the photo you can't find.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?view ... =0&ajf=100

It is called a "flying bridge" and is still in use today but the term has slightly morped to represent todays definition of "flying bridge".

"Modern" "flying bridge" on the RMS Queen Mary docked here in Los Angeles.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?view ... ajaxhist=0

Re: The steam navy and quarterdecks.

PostPosted: 19 Jan 2018 08:09
by ED, in Los Angeles
Josh&Historyland wrote:Being somewhat ignorant of the progress of naval architecture after the Napoleonic Wars I found the piratically straight sweep of the screw frigate Euryalus' deck a little alien. http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collection ... 66061.html
Would anybody know why the quarterdeck was dispensed with, and wether the term was retained for the rear quarter of the deck where the captain usually took his post?

Josh.

This deck of the warship Euryalus may seem alien to you, but when I saw the ships model, it screamed "HEY, this is an American heavy frigate deck layout!!!!!!!" And it is, positively. May I present the deck layout of the actual heavy frigate USS Constitution to you all.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/1ElALeDYbaw/maxresdefault.jpg

The Constitution quarter deck. Not raised as on Brit frigates.

https://notasitlooks.files.wordpress.co ... 07/159.jpg

Both the American USS Constitution AND the Euryalus are identical in main deck and gun deck cannon and placement. The deck is identical. The head and stern are almost identical. The size is real close.
The British frigates suffered horribly in the war of 1812, at the hands of the big American frigates. The ship Constitution alone destroyed five british warships and captered numerous British merchant ships. They could out run any British ship or squadron.

When you design a new generation of warships, you build upon the design of the most sucessful vessels afloat.

Here is another image that begged the British Admiralty for a new design based on the American model..

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-W_BWL980ebs/T ... rriere.jpg

Re: The steam navy and quarterdecks.

PostPosted: 19 Jan 2018 13:44
by Josh&Historyland
Thank you so much, Ed. You know I never would have thought to look at American deckplans. What vile prejudice!! :lol: But yes the British, except in a few cases, were badly mauled by the Yankee "Heavy Frigates" as they called them and old Ironsides was the most famous, I didn't realise she had no raised quarterdeck, even though I've seen photos of her upper gun batteries. Watson, you see but do not observe!
I don't suppose there's any written evidence that the British actually started building their ships after the American model and when this began is there? It would make sense of course, the RN had actually trailed behind France and Spain in the construction of warships during the Napoleonic wars and adopted many of their practices, it would make sense that they would do the same with frigate design. Usually they would copy a captured ship, maybe Chesapeake?
In turn I wonder if the Americans dispensed with the raised quarter deck because of how Pirates would knock down all the topside superstructure leaving a clean sweep fore and aft? Maybe that's stretching a little.
Josh.