Naval Brigade Organisation and Naval uniform 1860-65.

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Re: Naval Brigade Organisation and Naval uniform 1860-65.

Postby Josh&Historyland » 20 Jun 2017 22:00

Many thanks, John. That is darn near contemporary evidence to support a strong French presence in the battery.

For comparison I found some photographs showing definitive British tars.

HMS Baroosa, Japan 1864.
https://www.granger.com/wmpix/age/pps/0075854-JAPAN-SHIMONOSEKI-1864-A-corvette-of-21-guns-the-HMS-Baroosa-was-commanded-by-Captain-WM-Dowell-during-the-bombardment-of-Shimonoseki-in-1864-Photograph-by-Felix-Beato.jpg

Upper deck HMS Warrior 1860.
http://imageweb-cdn.magnoliasoft.net/nmm/supersize/7117.jpg

I think Boyes is the right hand officer with the colour belt in the original photo.
Josh.
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Re: Naval Brigade Organisation and Naval uniform 1860-65.

Postby mike snook » 21 Jun 2017 00:05

Josh

I can see nothing here that would allow a positive identification of the figure to which you direct us as Boyes. Perhaps you have a very much higher res version that gives you more confidence in that judgement? I observe that the cap badge he is wearing in John's photo is not at all like the cap badge being worn by the pair of 'ensigns' (only one of which is properly visible, but which is also consistent with the one being worn by the middy seven along the rampart).

Here's a thought, though, in respect of a reasonably safe start point...we can make a safe assumption to the effect that the rating holding the Union Flag is British...and there are a couple more ratings to his right who must also be...they are dressed in the same manner and would not be casually standing at the heart of a group of British officers if they were not also Brits. So, accepting that these three figures represent the uniform rig for the British ratings, I now start to see two distinctly different types of naval cap - one of which is consistent with the British ratings I have just identified, (white top with black hatband beneath), and one which seems to be a lot larger with a much more pronounced 'pancake' on top. It seems to me that the latter is being worn mainly by men in the all white rig, while the former is being worn by the men in the blue smocks. What about this postulation...white smocks for French or Dutch and blue smocks for British (?)....which would make the great majority in the photo British. Further deductive thought...since there are not that many men in the all white rig, might this be consistent with the apparently small size of the Dutch contingent....and with the suggestion that they were operating in intimate cooperation with the British...which seems to fit the intermingled intimacy of the photo. It is mainly the headdress of the men in white that caused me to doubt that this was a RN group...but if one singles them out as definitely being from some other nation...then what is left might indeed pass for RN in the 1860s...this assumes that they have fitted white cap covers to the blue caps clearly visible in your definitive photo of British tars at sea off Japan at that time. Pretty conjectural, but about the best I can do without being much more expert in naval uniform than I presently am!

As ever

M
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Re: Naval Brigade Organisation and Naval uniform 1860-65.

Postby Josh&Historyland » 21 Jun 2017 01:38

Mike.

My postulation about who Boyes is I must admit is conjecture, based on his basic face shape being rather similar and the fact he is wearing a colour belt on the same day Boyes was acting as the ensign for the brigade. Little else as I'm unable to find a better resolution image.

I wish we could get a firmer idea about the white and blue smocks, and thus proving or disproving your deduction, which I have been thinking myself for some time, (smocks or whatever they are properly called) John posted a very interesting painting of the attack on the Stockade which has the sailors in white rig, yet the on the spot drawing has the sailors in blue. Which would tally with what Baroosa's crew are wearing.

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