WO Form 619

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WO Form 619

Postby susancammas » 26 Nov 2016 19:21

Good evening

I have parts of my GGF's military file. Some of it is very tatty and difficult to read. One document is the W. O. Form 619, which he signed in Peshawar in 1880.

The first word(s) of the heading are illegible - can any of the experts help?
"......... to be made by a soldier or a person having been a soldier on renewing his service.

Many thanks in advance
Susan
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Re: WO Form 619

Postby m-j-d » 26 Nov 2016 22:17

Susan,

The missing word is declaration.

WO Form 619.jpg
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Regards,

Mike D.
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Re: WO Form 619

Postby susancammas » 26 Nov 2016 23:33

Many thanks Mike.

In case anybody is interested, here is the full text:

"I , (Name rank, number and regiment) do declare that I am at present (where serving); that I enlisted on the (date) for a term of twelve years ; that I am of the Age of (age in years and months) ; and that I will serve Her Majesty, Her Heirs and Successors in the (regiment) for such further term as shall complete a total service of twenty-one years, under the provisions of the Army Discipline and Regulation Act, 1879, provided my services should so long be required and also for a further term of twelve months if on service beyond the seas, or if a state of War exists between Her Majesty and any Foreign Power, or while soldiers in the reserve are by proclamation required to continue in or re-enter upon army service."

Regards
Susan
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Re: WO Form 619

Postby Frogsmile » 27 Nov 2016 15:56

Susan ,this is known colloquially as signing-on and familiar to generations of soldiers who wished to extend their service from an initial engagement. In theory a soldier could continue doing this until be completed the length of service (traditionally 22-years) that earned him a 'full' (i.e. the maximum permitted) pension.
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Re: WO Form 619

Postby susancammas » 29 Nov 2016 21:51

Again Many Thanks Frogsmile for this insight.

On 28th December in 1888, in Maker, my GGF signed on for further army service beyond 21 years.
Unfortunately he died 4 years later in 1892 (aged 42!) while still a gunner in Royal Artillery in 4 Redoubt, Maker.
I wonder how his widow and children fared after his death, in spite of his efforts to clock up the maximum pension.

So many unanswerable questions!

Kind regards
Susan
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Re: WO Form 619

Postby Frogsmile » 30 Nov 2016 13:22

susancammas wrote:Again Many Thanks Frogsmile for this insight.

On 28th December in 1888, in Maker, my GGF signed on for further army service beyond 21 years.
Unfortunately he died 4 years later in 1892 (aged 42!) while still a gunner in Royal Artillery in 4 Redoubt, Maker.
I wonder how his widow and children fared after his death, in spite of his efforts to clock up the maximum pension.

So many unanswerable questions!

Kind regards
Susan

That makes sense Susan and the process you describe was known as applying for Long Service (i.e. beyond the 21/22 year colour service engagement). This became so popular that later on it was more closely regulated and formalised to apply to a set number of 'suitable' posts that progressively reduced in number as mechanisation and civilianisation changed the nature of the supporting structure of the army (and defence as a whole). This later arrangement became known as the 'Long Service List' and there was great competition from time served and highly thought of men to get on to it.
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