Mid-Victorian Barbering

For general discussions on the British Army of the Victorian era or specific regiments.

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 06 Nov 2016 00:31

Fashion isn't an abstract, though. Unkemptness, apart from being, perhaps, a manifestation of a youthful male Romanticism, was also an expression of the shared vicissitudes of being on campaign, something the 'Home' army hadn't experienced for two generations or more. To that extent, it was a 'look' which then fed a fashion.
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2152
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby Peter » 03 Dec 2016 06:22

(i) Further to jf’s (p 2, 02 Nov 2016):

we have reference to orders regulating the practice of wearing facial hair in the 1830s - promulgated by the hyperactive William 'Sailor Billy' IV ( see- Peter's post here: viewtopic.php?f=19&t=11526) …………………………………………………..

By the 1830s it seems the practice of wearing moustachios was not merely a cavalry practice.

Then, 22 years later we have the relaxing of regulations relating to facial hair with regard to the Black Sea expeditionary force in 1854, which was a prelude to the heavily beared veterans of the Crimea and Indian Mutiny- all of which related to the practicalities of campaigning, and may have developed into a general fashion directly relating to the enhanced reputation of British soldiery in the aftermath of those campaigns.


"7th Aug. 1854 a Circular Memo bearing date 21 July 1854 was promulgated announcing that moustaches were authorized to be worn".

((Sergeant) Charles Usherwood's Service Journal, 1852 – 1856, (Diary of Services in the Crimea by Charles W Usherwood and while serving with the 1st Battalion 19th Regiment of Foot), Shared with The Victorian Web by the Green Howards),
http://www.victorianweb.org/history/cri ... dtime.html)

(ii)

By the 1830s it seems the practice of wearing moustachios was not merely a cavalry practice.

My postings in the other Topic referenced above may have been so cryptic as to be misleading.

The “abolishment” / “discontin(uance)” in the 1830 Circular was for the Cavalry only:

Untitled.png
Untitled.png (19.86 KiB) Viewed 137 times

(Circular, Horse Guards, August 2nd, 1830; United Service Magazine, 1830, Jul-Dec
p 364 / https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id= ... up;seq=358)

iii) Given the subject of this Topic, the remainder of the Circular is relevant:

Untitled.png
Untitled.png (35.3 KiB) Viewed 137 times
Peter
Senior Member
 
Posts: 452
Joined: 29 Jan 2009 03:03
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 15 Dec 2016 09:30

I meant to post this earlier. It's not comprehenive, but it helps build up a picture. I'll cross posting to the barbering thread.


1823 Orders for 9th, 12th 16th and 17th Light Dragoons to convert to Lancers
Moustaches to be grown
1830 The whole of the cavalry with the exception of the Royal Horse Guards (Blue) to be dressed in red at the next issue of clothing. / The mustachios of the cavalry (excepting in the Life Guards, The Royal Horse Guards, and the Hussars,) to be abolished, and the hair of the non-commisioned officer and soldier thtough out the regular forces, to be cut close at the sides and at the back of the head, instead of being worn in that bushy and unbecoming fashion adopted by some regiments Circular, Horse Guards, August 2nd, 1830

General Lord Hill [C-in-C]

John Macdonald
Adjutant-General

1832 Moustaches. Mr Editor- I fully concur in the opinion … that the moustache added considerably to the soldier-like appearance of our cavalry, but mark the absurd inconsistency which has attended their abolishment. The moustache was ordered to be abolished in consequence of his Majesty’s dislike to everything not perfectly British, and yet to strange to say, the only regiments allowed to retain the ornament, are HIS MAJESTY’S OWN HOUSEHOLD TROOPS, and the Hussars, to the dress of which latter corps… the moustache belongs, and why? Because hussars are altogether foreign… United Services Journal March 7th 1832

J.W.G.


1837
1st May The General [C-in-C] has, again, been desired by the King to call the attention of General Officers, and Commanding officers of Regiments, to the repeated orders that have been issued by Her Majesty’s Commands against wearing long hair and whiskers- Circular- Memorandum

Horse Guards
John Macdonald
AG
‘Received 10th May’

1854
21 July “a Circular Memo bearing date 21 July 1854 was promulgated announcing that moustaches were authorized to be worn". [Sergeant] Charles Usherwood's Service Journal, 1852 – 1856, (Diary of Services in the Crimea by Charles W Usherwood and while serving with the 1st Battalion 19th Regiment of Foot


1862 ON the 18th the 71st were paraded for inspection, at the conclusion of which Sir Hugh Rose made them a highly complimentary speech, telling them, in allusion to the fact of the men being clean shaved, that he was glad to see that they kept up the old custom of the Regiment by not wearing either beard or whiskers, which was an old characteristic of the corps

HLI Chronicle October 1912 (p.293)
'FIFTY YEARS AGO'

(Extract from the Army and Navy Gazette February 8, 1862)


1868 358. The following directions in regard to the growth of hair are to be strictly observed by all ranks. The hair is to be neatly cut, and kept short. Moustaches are to be worn, and the chin is to be shaved (except by pioneers, who will wear beards also). Whiskers, when worn, are to be of moderate length. On active service in the field beards may, however, be worn at the discretion of the General Officer commanding.

Queen’s Regulations
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2152
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby Peter » 24 Jan 2017 14:42

I just came across this from 2013 which we seem to have forgotten:

The Army Moustache, http://www.victorianwars.com/viewtopic.php?f=93&t=8809
Peter
Senior Member
 
Posts: 452
Joined: 29 Jan 2009 03:03
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 01 Apr 2017 14:04

More facial hair

The First Battalion [12th East Suffolk] went to Melbourne, Australia in 1854 and helped to suppress a miners' revolt at the Eureka Stockade. It moved to Tasmania, but during the next few years it was spread over Australia, with companies at Adelaide, Perth and Brisbane.

In 1860, two companies were sent to New Zealand to help contain the rebelling native Maoris. Further companies followed and over the next six years the Battalion took part in many actions against the Maoris in the dense and entangled bush of New Zealand. It was to earn the Battle Honour New Zealand for its services there. In 1867 it returned to England and then Ireland...

General Sir lan Hamilton joined the First Battalion in Ireland and recalled how, as a result of their long campaigning in New Zealand, from the Colonel downwards there was a cult of wearing long hair and sweeping mustachios with only a small space on the chin subject to shaving.

The History of The Suffolk Regiment Written by Eric Lummis

http://www.suffolkregiment.org/Suffolk_History.html
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2152
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Previous

Return to The Army

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest