Mid-Victorian Barbering

For general discussions on the British Army of the Victorian era or specific regiments.

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 06 Nov 2016 00:31

Fashion isn't an abstract, though. Unkemptness, apart from being, perhaps, a manifestation of a youthful male Romanticism, was also an expression of the shared vicissitudes of being on campaign, something the 'Home' army hadn't experienced for two generations or more. To that extent, it was a 'look' which then fed a fashion.
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2272
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby Peter » 03 Dec 2016 06:22

(i) Further to jf’s (p 2, 02 Nov 2016):

we have reference to orders regulating the practice of wearing facial hair in the 1830s - promulgated by the hyperactive William 'Sailor Billy' IV ( see- Peter's post here: viewtopic.php?f=19&t=11526) …………………………………………………..

By the 1830s it seems the practice of wearing moustachios was not merely a cavalry practice.

Then, 22 years later we have the relaxing of regulations relating to facial hair with regard to the Black Sea expeditionary force in 1854, which was a prelude to the heavily beared veterans of the Crimea and Indian Mutiny- all of which related to the practicalities of campaigning, and may have developed into a general fashion directly relating to the enhanced reputation of British soldiery in the aftermath of those campaigns.


"7th Aug. 1854 a Circular Memo bearing date 21 July 1854 was promulgated announcing that moustaches were authorized to be worn".

((Sergeant) Charles Usherwood's Service Journal, 1852 – 1856, (Diary of Services in the Crimea by Charles W Usherwood and while serving with the 1st Battalion 19th Regiment of Foot), Shared with The Victorian Web by the Green Howards),
http://www.victorianweb.org/history/cri ... dtime.html)

(ii)

By the 1830s it seems the practice of wearing moustachios was not merely a cavalry practice.

My postings in the other Topic referenced above may have been so cryptic as to be misleading.

The “abolishment” / “discontin(uance)” in the 1830 Circular was for the Cavalry only:

Untitled.png
Untitled.png (19.86 KiB) Viewed 451 times

(Circular, Horse Guards, August 2nd, 1830; United Service Magazine, 1830, Jul-Dec
p 364 / https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id= ... up;seq=358)

iii) Given the subject of this Topic, the remainder of the Circular is relevant:

Untitled.png
Untitled.png (35.3 KiB) Viewed 451 times
Peter
Senior Member
 
Posts: 471
Joined: 29 Jan 2009 03:03
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 15 Dec 2016 09:30

I meant to post this earlier. It's not comprehensive, but it helps build up a picture. I'll cross posting to the barbering thread.
[Added to subsequently as material is found]

1823 Orders for 9th, 12th 16th and 17th Light Dragoons to convert to Lancers
Moustaches to be grown

**EDIT: ADDED 20.9.17–

Memorandum 11th February 1828 (See: JSAHR, Vol. XXII, p.305)

The practice of wearing moustachios is now growing into very general extent throughout the service. There never was any precise order or Regulation under which this habit was premitted, even in the Hussars. But a kind of understanding has existed, that it was tolerated by the permission of authority, in that description of Force. Mustachios have been adopted in the Lancer Corps and gradually throughout all the Regiments of Dragoons. I do not believe that any Regiment of Cavalry is now without them. This practice is extending to the Infantry. When I was in Dublin four years ago, it was attempted by the 23rd Fusiliers, and by my interference was put down. But that corps shortly afterwards embarked for Gibraltar, and it immediately adopted mustachios, from having found some Corps in that Garrison wearing it. Since then I have understood that the practice is general in that Garrison. The 7th Fusiliers wear the mustachios. It was adopted in the Rifle Brigade, and I believe in a great many other Corps in the Mediterranean without orders or authority. It is un-English and a hindrance to recruiting”

Sir Henry Torrens, Adjutant General
(quoted in Mitlitary Customs, Major T.J. Edwards, 1948)


1830 The whole of the cavalry with the exception of the Royal Horse Guards (Blue) to be dressed in red at the next issue of clothing. The mustachios of the cavalry (excepting in the Life Guards, The Royal Horse Guards, and the Hussars,) to be abolished, and the hair of the non-commisioned officer and soldier thtough out the regular forces, to be cut close at the sides and at the back of the head, instead of being worn in that bushy and unbecoming fashion adopted by some regiments Circular, Horse Guards, August 2nd, 1830

General Lord Hill [C-in-C]

John Macdonald
Adjutant-General

**EDIT-ADDED 20.9.17-

1830 24th August The officer commanding the 2nd or Royal North British Dragoons (Now the Royal Scots Greys) submitted a request to Lord Hill the Commander-in-Chief for permission for his regiment to continue wearing moustaches. His reply dated 27th August 1830:

“Lord Hill is persuaded that the distinguished character of the Royal North British Dragoons can derive no additional weight from the wearing of moustaches…

P.S. Could the moustachio have been considered in anyway a national distinction, Lord Hill might have been induced to recommend the continuance of it by the Royal North British Dragoons, but as the case is quite the contrary, his Lordhsip sees no ground on which he could approach His Majesty on the subject.”

(quoted in Mitlitary Customs, Major T.J. Edwards, 1948)


1832 Moustaches. Mr Editor- I fully concur in the opinion … that the moustache added considerably to the soldier-like appearance of our cavalry, but mark the absurd inconsistency which has attended their abolishment. The moustache was ordered to be abolished in consequence of his Majesty’s dislike to everything not perfectly British and yet to strange to say, the only regiments allowed to retain the ornament, are HIS MAJESTY’S OWN HOUSEHOLD TROOPS, and the Hussars, to the dress of which latter corps… the moustache belongs, and why? Because hussars are altogether foreign…

J.W.G.
United Services Journal March 7th 1832



1837
1st May The General [C-in-C] has, again, ben desired by the King to call the attention of General Officers, and Commanding officers of Regiments, to the repeated orders that have been issued by Her Majesty’s Commands against wearing long hair and whiskers- Circular- Memorandum

Horse Guards
John Macdonald
AG
‘Received 10th May’

1844 Queen's Regulations, p. 129, Paragraph 58, reads as follows with no mention of moustaches:

"The Hair of the Troops is, constantly and habitually, to be cut short, both at the top and sides of the head, according to the Orders of the Sovereign, and the fashion of the day is not to be permitted to influence the practice of the Army in a particular which is considered alike essential to the health, the cleanliness, and the military appearance of the soldier".

1854
21 July “a Circular Memo bearing date 21 July 1854 was promulgated announcing that moustaches were authorized to be worn". [Sergeant] Charles Usherwood's Service Journal, 1852 – 1856, (Diary of Services in the Crimea by Charles W Usherwood and while serving with the 1st Battalion 19th Regiment of Foot

" Horse Guards Circular Memorandum 21st July 1854

A large part of the Army being employed in Turkey, where it had been found beneficial to keep the upper lip unshaven and allow the moustache to grow, the General Commanding-in-Chief is pleased to authorize that practice in the army in general, subject to the following regulations, which are to be strictly obeyed in Home and Colonial service.

A clear space of two inches must be left between the corner of the mouth and the whisker-
when whiskers are grown. The chin, the under lip and at least to inches of the upper part of the throat must be clean shaven, so that no hair can be seen above the stock in that place.

The wearing of the moustache is to be optional with all ranks.

The troops serving in the East will be allowed further latitude, in respect of shaving their beards and whiskers, as the General officer Commanding that Army may deem it expedient to sanction during the continuance of that serivce

By command, Geo. Cathcart A.G. "

[See- JSAHR, Vol XVIII, Autumn 1939, No.71]


1862 On the 18th the 71st were paraded for inspection, at the conclusion of which Sir Hugh Rose made them a highly complimentary speech, telling them, in allusion to the fact of the men being clean shaved, that he was glad to see that they kept up the old custom of the Regiment by not wearing either beard or whiskers, which was an old characteristic of the corps

HLI Chronicle October 1912 (p.293)

'FIFTY YEARS AGO'

(Extract from the Army and Navy Gazette February 8, 1862)


1868 358. The following directions in regard to the growth of hair are to be strictly observed by all ranks. The hair is to be neatly cut, and kept short. Moustaches are to be worn, and the chin is to be shaved (except by pioneers, who will wear beards also). Whiskers, when worn, are to be of moderate length. On active service in the field beards may, however, be worn at the discretion of the General Officer commanding.

Queen’s Regulations
Last edited by jf42 on 21 Sep 2017 08:52, edited 6 times in total.
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2272
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby Peter » 24 Jan 2017 14:42

I just came across this from 2013 which we seem to have forgotten:

The Army Moustache, http://www.victorianwars.com/viewtopic.php?f=93&t=8809
Peter
Senior Member
 
Posts: 471
Joined: 29 Jan 2009 03:03
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 01 Apr 2017 14:04

More facial hair

The First Battalion [12th East Suffolk] went to Melbourne, Australia in 1854 and helped to suppress a miners' revolt at the Eureka Stockade. It moved to Tasmania, but during the next few years it was spread over Australia, with companies at Adelaide, Perth and Brisbane.

In 1860, two companies were sent to New Zealand to help contain the rebelling native Maoris. Further companies followed and over the next six years the Battalion took part in many actions against the Maoris in the dense and entangled bush of New Zealand. It was to earn the Battle Honour New Zealand for its services there. In 1867 it returned to England and then Ireland...

General Sir lan Hamilton joined the First Battalion in Ireland and recalled how, as a result of their long campaigning in New Zealand, from the Colonel downwards there was a cult of wearing long hair and sweeping mustachios with only a small space on the chin subject to shaving.

The History of The Suffolk Regiment Written by Eric Lummis

http://www.suffolkregiment.org/Suffolk_History.html
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2272
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 25 Jun 2017 11:17

Further to our previous discussions here and on the Army Moustache thread, with references in particular to the adjustment of regulations in 1854, members might be interested to see the following:

" Horse Guards Circular Memorandum 21st July 1854

A large part of the Army being employed in Turkey, where it had been found beneficial to keep the upper lip unshaven and allow the moustache to grow, the General Commanding-in-Chief is pleased to authorize that practice in the army in general, subject to the following regulations, which are to be strictly obeyed in Home and Colonial service.

A clear space of two inches must be left between the corner of the mouth and the whisker- when whiskers are grown. The chin, the under lip and at least to inches of the upper part of the throat must be clean shaven, so that no hair can be seen above the stock in that place.

The wearing of the moustache is to be optional with all ranks.

The troops serving in the East will be allowed further latitude, in respect of shaving their beards and whiskers, as the General officer Commanding that Army may deem it expedient to sanction during the continuance of that serivce

By command, Geo. Cathcart A.G. "


JSAHR, Vol XVIII, Autumn 1939, No.71
Photography in the Crimea (VI), Capt H. Oakes Jones
Last edited by jf42 on 11 Sep 2017 23:06, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2272
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby colsjt65 » 26 Jun 2017 23:48

Horse Guards Circular Memorandum 21st July 1854...

Thanks JF42

This is the missing link I have been looking for between -

Queen’s Regulations 1844
58 The Hair of the Troops is constantly and habitually to be cut short both at the top and sides of the head according to the Orders of the Sovereign and the fashion of the day is not to be permitted to influence the practice of the Army in a particular which is considered alike essential to the health the cleanliness and the military appearance of the soldier.

and

Queen’s Regulations 1868
p. 85, 358. The following directions in regard to the growth of hair are to be strictly observed by all ranks. The hair is to be neatly cut, and kept short. Moustaches are to be worn, and the chin is to be shaved (except by pioneers, who will wear beards also). Whiskers, when worn, are to be of moderate length. On active service in the field beards may, however, be worn at the discretion of the General Officer commanding.

Strangely enough, I can find nothing on the subject in QR 1859 (which I only just found online) :cry:
https://archive.org/details/queensregulation00grea
User avatar
colsjt65
Senior Member
 
Posts: 294
Joined: 21 Jun 2011 04:46
Location: New Zealand

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 30 Jun 2017 06:02

Slowly, but surely... ( beards grow faster!)
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2272
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby Peter » 04 Aug 2017 15:08

1870

p 2.png
p 2.png (150.87 KiB) Viewed 219 times

(Item appears below:) Mutinous Conduct at Woolwich, Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Wednesday, March 9, 1870; Issue 3919, p 2. British Library Newspapers, Part I: 1800-1900.
Peter
Senior Member
 
Posts: 471
Joined: 29 Jan 2009 03:03
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 04 Aug 2017 17:49

A timely addition, Peter. Thanks.

The Long View BBC Radio 4 03/08/2017

Beards

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08zd772

Amidst some fairly specious arguments, to put it politely , this sets the bearded soldiers of the Crimea in context of a 'Beard Movement' that began before the war, epitomised by Charles Dickens' essay 'Why Shave?,' published in 1852.

Predictably, perhaps, 'an expert*' misrepresents the role of the bearded infantry pioneer:

One of the major sources of inspiration for Victorian men was returning soldiers from the Crimean campaign… who come back with magnificent beards, and part of the idea behind that was you put your moustachioed, heavy bearded men at the front of the marching column to frighten the enemy.

Um...thank you, Professor

NEXT!

[*i.e. a beard blogger https://dralun.wordpress.com/2012/04/26 ... n-history/]
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2272
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby Peter » 02 Sep 2017 11:31

1857
p 251.png
p 251.png (87.17 KiB) Viewed 186 times

Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, XLV, 1967, Winter, No 184.


1910 ..… 1854 ….. 1914 – 1918
p 119.png
p 119.png (187.47 KiB) Viewed 186 times

JSAHR, XLVII, 1969, Summer, No 190.


1630 – 1685 ….. 18th Century ….. 1854 – 1857 ….. 1899
p 62.png
p 62.png (223.5 KiB) Viewed 186 times

JSAHR, XLVIII, 1970, Spring, No 193.
Peter
Senior Member
 
Posts: 471
Joined: 29 Jan 2009 03:03
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Mid-Victorian Barbering

Postby jf42 » 21 Sep 2017 06:57

An interesting addition to this subject from the section on Moustaches in Military Customs, by Major T.J. Edwards, (Polden 1948- pp. 112-13) and citing JSAHR, Vol. XXII, p.305.

Memorandum 11th February 1828

The practice of wearing moustachios is now growing into very general extent throughout the service. There never was any precise order or Regulation under which this habit was permitted, even in the Hussars. But a kind of understanding has existed, that it was tolerated by the permission of authority, in that description of Force. Mustachios have been adopted in the Lancer Corps and gradually throughout all the Regiments of Dragoons. I do not believe that any Regiment of Cavalry is now without them. This practice is extending to the Infantry. When I was in Dublin four years ago, it was attemptd by the 23rd Fusiliers, and by my interference was put down. But that corps shortly afterwards embarked for Gibraltar, and it immediately adopted mustachios, from having found some Corps in that Garrison wearing it. Since then I have understood that the practice is general in that Garrison. The 7th Fusiliers wear the mustachios. It was adopted in the Rifle Brigade, and I believe in a great many other Corps in the Mediterranean without orders or authority. It is un-English and a hindrance to recruiting.”

Sir Henry Torrens, Adjutant General


[1830 2nd August. Order forbidding the wearing of moustaches except by Household Cavalry and Hussars]


1830 24th August THe officer commanding the 2nd or Royal North British Dragoons (Now the Royal Scots Greys) submitted a request to Lord Hill, the C-in-C, for permission for his regiment to continue wearing moustaches.

[His reply dated 27th August 1830:]
'Lord Hill is persuaded that the distinguished character of the Royal North British Dragoons can derive no additional weight from the wearing of moustaches…

P.S. Could the moustachio have been considered in anyway a national distinction, Lord Hill might have been induced to recommend the continuance of it by the Royal North British Dragoons, but as the case is quite the contrary, his Lordhsip sees no ground on which he could approach His Majesty on the subject.”

I have added these excerpts to the list I posted on this thread back in December 2016 and, as before. cross-posted to the 'Moustaches' thread.
User avatar
jf42
Senior Veteran member
 
Posts: 2272
Joined: 10 Mar 2011 15:12

Previous

Return to The Army

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron