New Addition to Library.

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New Addition to Library.

Postby Josh&Historyland » 08 Apr 2015 16:43

I was excited to buy Osprey's Men at Arms "New Zealand Wars" a few days ago. Given the scarcity of material for these conflicts I had my eye out for it and finally managed to snap it up. After a brief perusal I'm quite pleased with it, illustrations are nice and Ian Knight has I think provided what at first glance appears to be a simplistic but concise overview, and doubtless will compliment my prized hardback "To face the Daring Maori's" and "British Army on Campaign (1) rather well.

I always like to talk books so feel free to share your new purchases.

Josh.
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Re: New Addition to Library.

Postby colsjt65 » 08 Apr 2015 21:41

I must send you my list of over 30 really basic errors I found in it then. I find it ironic that he thanks to my friend Tim Ryan in the book, but if he had sent him a proof copy, Tim and I could have fixed all the errors...
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Re: New Addition to Library.

Postby colsjt65 » 08 Apr 2015 21:52

While I'm here, I may as well list them:-

p. 14 - Wairau affray 1843 - Says that Te Ruaparaha (sic) [Te Rauparaha] took utu for the death of his daughter. But it was Te Rangihaeata (not mentioned in text) who took utu and killed the prisoners, as she was his wife.
p. 15 - Spelling mistake - Caption of attack by the British 57th Regt on a pa in the Taraniki (sic) district.

p. 16 -
Pratt's attack on the Te Arei pa in January 1861 - He started his attack on Matarikoriko 31 Dec 1860, then advanced by sap and redoubt building, not reaching Te Arei until March.
Spelling - Mere Mere - modern spelling of place is Meremere.

p. 17 -
Tauranga and Gate pa is mentioned in a paragraph about the rise of Pai-Marire. The defenders of Gate pa were not Hauhau, but supporters of kingitanga. One day later, it was Hauhau that attacked Sentry Hill in Taranaki.
No mention of General Chute's campaign of 1866.

p. 34 -
Turuturu Mokai 'blockhouse'. It was a redoubt.
80th Regiment departed 1844, not 1845. 96th 1843-1846, not 1841-1847. 99th arrived 1844, not 1845. 57th arrived 1861, not 1860. 70th arrived 1861, not 1863. 18th arrived before the 50th. 43rd arrived after the 50th in 1863. 14th departed in 1866, not 1867. 12th departed in 1867, not 1866.

p. 35 -
Members of Military Store Department, Chaplain's Department, Purveyor's Department and Royal Marines also present in New Zealand.

p. 37 -
"Italian pattern" canteen was introduced in 1874. The type in New Zealand was the small coopered oak barrel type used since the Napoleonic Wars.
Percussion musket rate of fire of only 2 rounds a minute. I have read this elsewhere, but this is the official rate of fire. There is no practical reason why the rate of fire is any slower than a flintlock - i.e. 3 rounds, even 4.
Pocket on 'jumper' jacket is on left breast, not right.

p. 38 -
"Pork-pie" - a colloquial term. I have never found a contemporary use of that term referring to a forage cap. The infantry cap was a "Kilmarnock".
Leggings "fastened with straps on the side" - They were fastened with buttons, with one strap at the top.
Improved rate of fire for 1853 Enfield. The rate of fire was the same as any muzzle loader.
Brown blankets - By the 1860s the blankets were grey.
Men in the photo wearing "white drill jackets and red knitted nightcaps" are wearing an unbleached canvas frock and trousers, of the ordinary sea-kit pattern, worn by cooks, as well as the men on board ship during a voyage to preserve their uniform clothing. There is no reference in any clothing lists to a red nightcap. Standing orders of the 65th Regiment in 1847 does mention cooks being issued 'strong brown cooking dresses and ... caps'.

p. 39 -
1822 pattern sword in steel scabbard - "For Regimental Field Officers, brass; for Musketry Instructors and Adjutants, steel; for other Officers, black leather with gilt fittings".
"Snider Artillery pattern" carbine - the Snider had not been developed until late 1866. The Artillery Mounted troop - "Each man was armed with a regulation cavalry sword and either carbine (cavalry pattern) or a Dean and Adams' revolver. These arms were supplied by the Colonial Government." [Pickard]
Elements of C Battery, 4th Brigade also took part in South Taranaki campaigns of 1865 and 1866. No mention of I Battery, 4th Brigade.
p. 40 -
Says that two 40-pounder siege (land-based) Armstrong guns used at Gate Pa, Naval 40-pounder Armstrongs used to shell Meremere. - It was the other way round - siege guns at Meremere, naval at Gate Pa.
"rocket troughs" - Congreve rockets of this period were fired from rocket tubes.
Caption "small Coehorn mortar, with its shells to the left". Mortar shells were not attached to a sabot. These are howitzer shells, as well as some 6-pr Armstrong shells.

p. 47) - Photo of 'Forest Rangers' - it is a photo of Taranaki Bush Rangers, in the Puke Ariki (New Plymouth museum) collection.

THE PLATES:
Plate C: British Troops 1845
The forage caps in Bridge's paintings look distinctly like the 1829 pattern with very large crown, but in the illustration they look like a Kilmarnock, squashed slightly at the base with a black band. [still not resolved quite what they wore]
C1) Militiaman - highly unlikely he would be armed with a percussion musket. The 96th and 99th regiments were still armed with flintlocks at that time.
Musket carried by both men (1 and 2) - no percussion musket had a ladder rear sight. They had a simple fixed rear sight.
Plate D: British Troops 1860s
D1) Gunner, Royal Artillery - see note above about weapons they carried.
D2) Private 12th Regiment. He is depicted carrying the Enfield Short Rifle, with sword bayonet. This was only carried by sergeants. Privates were armed with the Enfield Long Rifle (aka 3 bander), with triangular socket bayonet. There is no tourie visible on his Kilmarnock.
D3) Officer - Wearing red stripe on trousers - should be scarlet welt, quarter inch broad. Depiction as shown is possible, but it was more likely they wore their Wellington boots inside the trouser leg or wore short lace up boots. During the Taranaki war many of the officers of the 65th equipped themselves with Naval cutlasses, discarding their 'holiday swords'.

Plate H: Armed Constabulary.
This plate and the text in the book gives the impression that the AC took part in fighting armed with the Snider. They didn't receive it until about 1870. At that stage the only ones pursuing Te Kooti were Kupapa Maori, still armed with Calisher & Terry carbines.
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Re: New Addition to Library.

Postby Josh&Historyland » 08 Apr 2015 23:23

A comprehensive list indeed. A shame he didn't run it past some more people, I'll be sure to watch out for these when/if I use it as a source, I'll certainly not go chapter and verse. Ruggieri should've done his research better though his overall technique is admirable. Knight it must be said often makes fopas even in subjects he is more versed in, IE calling iSandlwana a massacre. I raised an eyebrow when I realised he had not had much experience in the NZ wars. What about the other one, Maori fortifications?

I recently finished a review of a book on Waterloo with much less numerous but no less glaring errors, and did a back and forth with the author, sadly he was not convinced in time but said a later edition could be amended. We might live in hope similarly for this one.
Thanks.

Josh.
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