New Books for 2016

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New Books for 2016

Postby Mark » 16 Mar 2016 16:47

Due for release on 15 June 2016.

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A disgruntled garrison’s chance killing of two young British officers sent to govern the city of Multan sparks an unexpected war between the East India Company and the Sikh Empire. Following calls for retribution, Sir Hugh Gough, the veteran British Commander-in-Chief, strikes into the heart of the Punjab with a large force to face the Sikh army. After two inconclusive contests at Ramnuggar and Sadulpore, he nearly comes to grief at the small village of Chillianwalla by the Jhelum River, with half his line repulsed and his force in confusion. Only the fast-gathering darkness and jungle obscure the advantage lying with the Sikh army and prevent a complete British disaster. Recovering from the setback, Gough would achieve a decisive victory at the final battle of Gujrat, paving the way for British rule up to the Khyber Pass.
Mark Simner BA (Hons) MSc | Web: http://marksimner.me.uk | Twitter @marksimner
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Re: New Books for 2016

Postby Mark » 18 Mar 2016 10:17

Due for release on 30 September 2016.

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Officers led and men followed; all were expected to do their duty without thought of reward. Enlisted men rarely penetrated the officer ranks and promotion owed more to money than merit. Then came the Crimean War. The incompetence and ineffectiveness of the senior officers contrasted sharply with the bravery of the lower ranks. Fuelled by the reports from the first-ever war correspondents which were read by an increasingly literate public, the mumblings of discontent rapidly grew into a national outcry. Questions were asked in Parliament, answers were demanded by the press why were the heroes of the Alma, Inkerman and the Charge of the Light Brigade not being recognised? Something had be done. That something was the introduction of an award that would be of such prestige it would be sought by all men from the private to the Field Marshal. It would be the highest possible award for valour in the face of the enemy and it bore the name of the Queen for whom the men fought. This is the story of how the first Victoria Crosses were attained in the heat of the most deadly conflict of the nineteenth century. It is also an examination of how the definition of courage, as recognised by the awarding of VCs, evolved, from saving the regimental colours at the Alma to saving a comrade in the No Man s Land before Sevastopol.
Mark Simner BA (Hons) MSc | Web: http://marksimner.me.uk | Twitter @marksimner
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Re: New Books for 2016

Postby Mark » 18 Mar 2016 10:19

Due for release on 21 July 2016.

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Pathan Rising tells the story of the large-scale tribal unrest that erupted along the North West Frontier of India in the late 1890s; a short but sharp period of violence that was initiated by the Pathan tribesmen against the British. Although the exact causes of the unrest remain unclear, it was likely the result of tribal resentment towards the establishment of the Durand Line and British 'forward policy', during the last echoes of the 'Great Game', that led the proud tribesmen to take up arms on an unprecedented scale. This resentment was brought to boiling point by a number of fanatical religious leaders, such as the Mad Fakir and the Hadda Mullah, who visited the various Pathan tribes calling for jihad. By the time the risings ended, eleven Victoria Crosses would be awarded to British troops, which hints at the ferocity and level of bitterness of the fighting. Indeed, although not eligible for the VC in 1897, many Indian soldiers would also receive high-level decorations in recognition of their bravery. It would be one of the greatest challenges to British authority in Asia during the Victorian era.
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Re: New Books for 2016

Postby Mark » 18 Mar 2016 10:21

Due for release on 20 September 2016.

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From "New York Times" bestselling author of "Destiny of the Republic" and "The River of Doubt," a thrilling narrative of Winston Churchill's extraordinary and little-known exploits during the Boer War

At age twenty-four, Winston Churchill was utterly convinced it was his destiny to become prime minister of England one day, despite the fact he had just lost his first election campaign for Parliament. He believed that to achieve his goal he must do something spectacular on the battlefield. Despite deliberately putting himself in extreme danger as a British Army officer in colonial wars in India and Sudan, and as a journalistcovering a Cuban uprising against the Spanish, glory and fame had eluded him.

Churchill arrived in South Africa in 1899, valet and crates of vintage wine in tow, there to cover the brutal colonial war the British were fighting with Boer rebels. But just two weeks after his arrival, the soldiers he was accompanying on an armored train were ambushed, and Churchill was taken prisoner. Remarkably, he pulled off a daring escape--but then had to traverse hundreds of miles of enemy territory, alone, with nothing but a crumpled wad of cash, four slabs of chocolate, and his wits to guide him.

The story of his escape is incredible enough, but then Churchill enlisted, returned to South Africa, fought in several battles, and ultimately liberated the men with whom he had been imprisoned.

Churchill would later remark that this period, "could I have seen my future, was to lay the foundations of my later life." Millard spins an epic story of bravery, savagery, and chance encounters with a cast of historical characters including Rudyard Kipling, Lord Kitchener, and Mohandas Gandhi with whom he would later share the world stage. But "Hero of the Empire" is more than an adventure story, for the lessons Churchill took from Boer War would profoundly affect 20th century history."
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Re: New Books for 2016

Postby Mark » 18 Mar 2016 10:24

Due for release on 22 September 2016.

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The battle of Rorke's Drift is established in history as one of Britain's most incredible actions where approximately 155 defenders held off a Zulu force of over 4,000 warriors, in a savage, bloody conflict with no quarter given by either side. The battle led to a display of incredible fortitude, courage and tenacity resulting in mutual respect between British red coat and Zulu warrior. Using a vast array of primary accounts, including lesser known, and previously unpublished examples, the author describes the battle in vivid detail. The actions of each of the 11 Victoria Cross recipients are looked at in detail, together with those men who were awarded the DCM. Illustrated with previously unpublished artwork, 'Rorke's Drift-A New Perspective' is a gripping account, which questions what is commonly believed to be the true interpretation of the hospital fighting. A truly compelling read, packed with numerous footnotes and sources, appealing to both the casual reader and the serious historian.
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Re: New Books for 2016

Postby Mark » 18 Mar 2016 11:23

Due for release on 30 April 2016.

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The nineteenth century saw the British army engaged in a series of conflicts around the globe. Iin almost every continent the redcoats of British soldiers seemed to be in perpetual action against enemies of the Crown. The Anglo-Zulu War, fought in southern Africa in 1879, was one of the bloodiest of these conflicts, and one of the most famous, and it has fascinated historians ever since. But the story has never, until now, been re-told in verse - and that is what Harry Turner does in the sequence of poems he has composed for this memorable volume. He concentrates on the relationship between the British and the Zulus, on the politics and ambition that gave rise to the war and on the series of bloody battles that followed - in particular at Isandlwana, Rorke's Drift and Ulundi. Graphically he recalls how King Cetshwayo's Zulu warriors, armed mainly with spears, gave the British a mauling before they were finally overcome. The story has often been told before, but rarely in such an original and evocative way.Harry Turner's work will be an absorbing introduction to the subject for readers who are coming to it for the first time, and it will add a new dimension to the understanding of readers who are familiar with the many more conventional histories of the conflict.
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