Pattern 1841 Artillery Carbine Identification

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Pattern 1841 Artillery Carbine Identification

Postby yulzari » 29 Jun 2017 17:12

have a Pattern 1841 Artillery Carbine which has been modified for use as a civilian shotgun.

The butt plate shows a unit marking which I have been unable identify. The stampings are quite clear and unambiguous.
Vertically they read:
RTA
2
Co
42 I presume it to be Rack Number 42 of 2 Company of 'RTA'. The question is what unit is 'RTA'?

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Re: Pattern 1841 Artillery Carbine Identification

Postby Frogsmile » 29 Jun 2017 19:45

It seems to me that a likely provenance might be the Royal Tynemouth Artillery of garrison artillery volunteers. This was the senior body of artillery 'volunteers' in Britain and came under the auspices of the Northumberland division of volunteer artillery. There was no other artillery unit with the 'T' designation within its title.
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Re: Pattern 1841 Artillery Carbine Identification

Postby yulzari » 29 Jun 2017 22:38

Thank you for that Frogsmile. I am not convinced of the fit though. They were known as 'Tynemouth Volunteer Artillery' and I can't see them getting away with using a 'Royal' title without having been granted it. Royal Train of Artillery has been suggested elsewhere but there was no such unit nor organisation in the period. Whoever they were they had more than one Company/Battery and at least 42 soldiers per Company. I have scrutinised the stampings and the letters/numbers cannot be interpreted other than as above.

Of course it could be as easily a Miners & Sapper Carbine as they are indistinguishable. but this direction has proved no better results.
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Re: Pattern 1841 Artillery Carbine Identification

Postby Frogsmile » 29 Jun 2017 22:58

I agree 100% with your reservations and had considered the 'Royal' omission too, but there were no other units with T in title and only garrison artillery was organised in companies, so that seemed most likely.
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Re: Pattern 1841 Artillery Carbine Identification

Postby yulzari » 03 Jul 2017 16:42

The butt stock is marked to a Class III category so it would have been for service in colonial and/or volunteer use after an original issue to the Regular forces as a Class I. Class III was a designation of it's obsolescence not it's condition. A Class III weapon would be in all ways fit for service but not for Regular Army issue.

Maybe the 'RTA' went on with a Class III user?

I presume that the Royal Marine Artillery would have needed a carbine but where does the 'T' come from and I can trace no record of what they had at all by way of small arms in the period. The lock plate is dated 1846.
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