Mystery iron bucket

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Mystery iron bucket

Postby niimmm » 06 Oct 2017 15:17

Hi guys.
A neighbour of mine has put this cast iron bucket in their front garden. We've both been trying to find out what it is but with no success. It's cast iron so is extremely heavy.

Does anyone here know what it could be?

Simon
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ploughman » 06 Oct 2017 16:28

never seen one so no real idea , but looks like you would wash something in the main part and let it drain on the perforated top.
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby Frogsmile » 06 Oct 2017 16:58

It looks something like an early overhead toilet cistern with the top removed. Is there a vertical slot on one side near the top? A lever, fitted with hanging chain and cast iron oval handle hung down. I recall them in the external toilet blocks of Victorian built Army barracks in my youth. They were marked with WD and date in that manner and mounted on stout, cast iron brackets bolted to the wall.
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ploughman » 06 Oct 2017 20:48

Frogsmile wrote:It looks something like an early overhead toilet cistern with the top removed. Is there a vertical slot on one side near the top? A lever, fitted with hanging chain and cast iron oval handle hung down. I recall them in the external toilet blocks of Victorian built Army barracks in my youth. They were marked with WD and date in that manner and mounted on stout, cast iron brackets bolted to the wall.


that sounds pretty feasible .... dimensions would be helpful perhaps in clinching this . C & M after a firm's name often indicates currier and maker , which seems unlikely in this context. Maybe Civil & Military ?
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ploughman » 06 Oct 2017 20:49

niimmm wrote:Hi guys.
A neighbour of mine has put this cast iron bucket in their front garden. We've both been trying to find out what it is but with no success. It's cast iron so is extremely heavy.

Does anyone here know what it could be?

Simon


what are its dimensions please ?
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby Frogsmile » 06 Oct 2017 21:24

ploughman wrote:
Frogsmile wrote:It looks something like an early overhead toilet cistern with the top removed. Is there a vertical slot on one side near the top? A lever, fitted with hanging chain and cast iron oval handle hung down. I recall them in the external toilet blocks of Victorian built Army barracks in my youth. They were marked with WD and date in that manner and mounted on stout, cast iron brackets bolted to the wall.


that sounds pretty feasible .... dimensions would be helpful perhaps in clinching this . C & M after a firm's name often indicates currier and maker , which seems unlikely in this context. Maybe Civil & Military ?


I don’t think it’s courier and maker, ploughman, civil and military seems more likely, especially with a WD mark. I agree that dimensions are key, and also a vertical slot in the case of my theory.
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ED, in Los Angeles » 06 Oct 2017 22:16

If this is a wall mounted cistern, (tank in America speak), it should have a 25mm hole on the side at the top for water inlet, and an approx' 80mm hole dead center bottom, for a "spud" fitting that attaches the large metal water tube to the bottom of the tank, that flows to the flush bowl beneath. Does it have ANY drain on the bottom? It looks like an old sink to me. In fact, I am going to repair a broken pipe and unclog a sink looking much like this after I post this. The first cistern toilet like this was first marketed in the 1860's by Thomas Crapper from Belfast????, I think. And *YES*, that is his name!!!!!!!!!!! This type of toilet was relatively new and for the upper class at this time. Democratization for the masses would come soon. You need running water and sewerage pipes for this. I worked in a house built in 1898/1910 and the original bathroom had NO toilet. The toilet was in the hall in a closet that held cloths. "Water Closet", get it!

https://www.bing.com/images/search?view ... ajaxhist=0
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby Frogsmile » 06 Oct 2017 23:42

ED, in Los Angeles wrote:If this is a wall mounted cistern, (tank in America speak), it should have a 25mm hole on the side at the top for water inlet, and an approx' 80mm hole dead center bottom, for a "spud" fitting that attaches the large metal water tube to the bottom of the tank, that flows to the flush bowl beneath. Does it have ANY drain on the bottom? It looks like an old sink to me. In fact, I am going to repair a broken pipe and unclog a sink looking much like this after I post this. The first cistern toilet like this was first marketed in the 1860's by Thomas Crapper from Belfast????, I think. And *YES*, that is his name!!!!!!!!!!! This type of toilet was relatively new and for the upper class at this time. Democratization for the masses would come soon. You need running water and sewerage pipes for this. I worked in a house built in 1898/1910 and the original bathroom had NO toilet. The toilet was in the hall in a closet that held cloths. "Water Closet", get it!

https://www.bing.com/images/search?view ... ajaxhist=0


I agree with all you say concerning outlets Ed, and am concerned too that I can see no vertical slot, although that was occasionally in the side of the lid/cover for some designs. The expression to have or go for a crap comes from Thomas Crapper as you have implied. It’s true also that the mid 1870s is early for flushing toilets in barracks but when built there was consideration of modern sanitary systems in newly built British barracks so it’s not impossible. That said it is just the overall shape that was reminiscent of a cistern and I accept it might not be that at all.
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ploughman » 07 Oct 2017 00:17

Frogsmile wrote:
ploughman wrote:
Frogsmile wrote:It looks something like an early overhead toilet cistern with the top removed. Is there a vertical slot on one side near the top? A lever, fitted with hanging chain and cast iron oval handle hung down. I recall them in the external toilet blocks of Victorian built Army barracks in my youth. They were marked with WD and date in that manner and mounted on stout, cast iron brackets bolted to the wall.


that sounds pretty feasible .... dimensions would be helpful perhaps in clinching this . C & M after a firm's name often indicates currier and maker , which seems unlikely in this context. Maybe Civil & Military ?


I don’t think it’s courier and maker, ploughman, civil and military seems more likely, especially with a WD mark. I agree that dimensions are key, and also a vertical slot in the case of my theory.


no no, 'CURRIER and maker' , not courier ! ... the WD mark often appears with C & M after a firms name on leather equipment .
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ploughman » 07 Oct 2017 00:23

The next step should be to track down the firm that made it and see what they use to make . Graces Guide is is a very useful source of historical info on defunct British manufacturers but so far I can find no mention of Malletts , or at least a Malletts that were involved in cast iron fabrication.
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ED, in Los Angeles » 07 Oct 2017 01:32

As previously stated Simon, what are the dimensions? And is the broad arrow in "relief" and cast into the article, or just painted on?
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby Frogsmile » 07 Oct 2017 08:56

[quote=“ploughman”] no no, 'CURRIER and maker' , not courier ! ... the WD mark often appears with C & M after a firms name on leather equipment[/quote]

Noted. Any potential connection with leatherwork completely escaped me.
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ploughman » 07 Oct 2017 20:23

Frogsmile wrote:[quote=“ploughman”] no no, 'CURRIER and maker' , not courier ! ... the WD mark often appears with C & M after a firms name on leather equipment


Noted. Any potential connection with leatherwork completely escaped me.[/quote]

I cant see how there would be either its just that I have several items of equipment similarly marked ( though different maker ) and they all show up in the records as Currier & Maker ( the reasoning behind this being that the role of currier and the role of maker are often done by separate manufacturers , but some firms did both ).
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby Frogsmile » 07 Oct 2017 21:39

Yes I see. Well I’ve just done a search online using the terms: “antique cast iron overhead toilet cisterns” and under images it came up with many examples remarkably similar to your object, especially early designs where the lever protruded from the top centre of the cistern’s cover, which in this case is missing. I am also not sure that the perforated plate on the top is doing more than resting there and not necessarily fixed or a part of it.
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Re: Mystery iron bucket

Postby ploughman » 08 Oct 2017 00:05

Frogsmile wrote:Yes I see. Well I’ve just done a search online using the terms: “antique cast iron overhead toilet cisterns” and under images it came up with many examples remarkably similar to your object, especially early designs where the lever protruded from the top centre of the cistern’s cover, which in this case is missing. I am also not sure that the perforated plate on the top is doing more than resting there and not necessarily fixed or a part of it.


But we still need to know if there is an exit hole for the water from the cistern , and the dimensions would be useful too.
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