Drill in Victorian Times

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Drill in Victorian Times

Postby theironduke1 » 02 Sep 2017 22:10

The kind of drill that the British Army uses today ( which many of us have had to suffer through) began in the very late 19th and early 20th centuries. Before that, I believe drill was altogether different. No swinging of arms, no stamping of boots etc. When soldiers stood at ease, they folded their arms across the front (alsmost like they do with the SA80 today) and moved one leg forward with the knee slightly bended. My question is, which knee was bended - the right or the left?
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby Frogsmile » 02 Sep 2017 22:51

Hands were clasped, palms inwards, one over the other on the groin. The left leg was pointing forward and the right leg was placed so that the right foot was turned slightly to the right and behind, rather like the position when at 'present arms' today.
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby colsjt65 » 03 Sep 2017 08:58

This from my website - 1861 drill
http://hicketypip.tripod.com/Rifledrill/standat.htm#Stand%20at%20Ease
This is long rifle (1853 pattern - '3 bander')

Short rifle was to grasp the barrel below the top band with the right hand and straighten arm while moving right foot back.

Without arms http://hicketypip.tripod.com/FieldExercise/Recruit/intervals.htm#Standing%20at%20Ease:

1 Raise the arms from the elbows, left hand in front of the centre of the body, as high as the waist, palm upwards
the right hand as high as the right breast, palm to the left front
both thumbs separated from the fingers, and the elbows close to the sides.

2 Strike the palm of the right hand on that of the left,
drop the arms to their extent, keeping the hands together, and passing the right hand over the back of the left as they fall
at the same time draw back the right foot six inches, and bend slightly the left knee.
(Please note: In the 1859 edition of this manual, you bring forward the left foot six inches)

When the motions are completed the arms must hang loosely and easily, the fingers towards the ground, the right thumb held between the palm of the left hand; the body must incline forward, the weight being on the right leg and the whole attitude without constraint.
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby theironduke1 » 03 Sep 2017 17:55

Thank you Frogsmile and coltsjt65. Whas the 1861 drill ever modified before the end of the century? When did the new drill come into play? Was it 1898 or 9?
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby rd72 » 03 Sep 2017 22:05

HI there.

Bruce's website is a great resource for the Manual and Platoon Exercise of the '60s.

The drill was changed, most significantly, by the "new" Stand at Ease,and the "new" Turns at the Halt, as ratified in the 1902 Infantry Training.

Until then, the drill from the '60s changed little. Hand placement on the rifle when at the Order, etc... There was, however, an overhaul in 1892 with the Slope being flat on the shoulder (to accommodate the Magazine Rifle), arm swinging in some positions and the abolition of Slow Time. There were greater changes in 1896 with the change of the "Shoulder", the increasing use of the Slope in ceremonial evaluations, arm swinging in all positions in Quick Time and the re-adoption of Slow Time (with the customary no arm swinging), among other bits...
Cheers,
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby Frogsmile » 03 Sep 2017 22:24

Rob, theironduke1, is Bruce.
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby rd72 » 04 Sep 2017 04:52

Frogsmile wrote:Rob, theironduke1, is Bruce.


Ah, I see. So is colsjt65... :-)
Cheers,
Rob
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby Frogsmile » 04 Sep 2017 08:18

rd72 wrote:
Frogsmile wrote:Rob, theironduke1, is Bruce.


Ah, I see. So is colsjt65... :-)


Ah...understood. And they both have websites! :?
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby colsjt65 » 04 Sep 2017 10:08

Your name's not Bruce? Now that could get confusing. Mind if we call you Bruce?
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby Frogsmile » 04 Sep 2017 12:52

colsjt65 wrote:Your name's not Bruce? Now that could get confusing. Mind if we call you Bruce?


Why not....I've been called worse. :P
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby theironduke1 » 04 Sep 2017 22:36

Yes, I am Bruce but I don't mind you calling everyone Bruce. Thats what Monty Python did when it was the mosy popular Christian name in Australia! :D
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby NWMPMoose » 03 Nov 2017 17:00

Fortunately for us, one of our forum members, Rob, owns an excellent youtube channel, and patreon page, where he not only fires historic firearms, or reviews uniform and accoutrements, but he also reviews and demonstrates the manual exersize. It is one thing to read the manuals on your own, but at least for me, it really helps being able to see someone performing the drills themselves, and giving clear instruction. Rob does a great job at this in a series of videos that are quite enjoyable to watch. Many of his videos begin with a relevant comedy act which he performs himself.

If you're interested, here is one of Rob's videos I believe you will find most beneficial;

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=G_DiAjxEZOk

12 minutes into the video, you can find "stand at ease" which you asked about earlier in this thread.
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Re: Drill in Victorian Times

Postby jf42 » 04 Nov 2017 00:40

Rob is rd72, above. When in uniform of the 78th he has been known to answers to 'Bruce.'
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