42nd Piper

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42nd Piper

Postby ronmarsden » 17 Nov 2017 13:11

Original water colour signed Martin 78. Title reads Black Watch (later 42nd) 1745.
Would like to hear comments on the uniform ie lace cuffs and yellow facings.
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Re: 42nd Piper

Postby Ron Abbott » 17 Nov 2017 13:34

Of greater interest is that the drones are standing still on his shoulder without any means of holding them together and yet still standing upright. Furthermore, common to some illustrations purportedly of that era, the bass (?) drone is on the outside rather than the inside. The pipe banner is similar to that in other illustrations.

The tartan bears little likeness to other illustrations from the era and I'm left wondering whether this has anything whatsoever do do with the 'Watch'. Furthermore the sporran looks like a later pattern.

I'm left thinking that this is based on earlier illustrations.
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Re: 42nd Piper

Postby Peterem » 17 Nov 2017 13:41

The yellow facings, split jacket cuff and lacy shirt cuffs match the early uniform quite closely: see for instance http://www.theblackwatch.co.uk/history- ... rly-years/ . But the Royal Stuart (?) tartan plaid and English cross of St. George on the pipe banner seem highly unlikely!

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Re: 42nd Piper

Postby jf42 » 18 Nov 2017 22:50

Ron, greetings. This painting would seem to be based in part on the image of 'Macdonnel' - the piper Donald Macdonald, one of a contemporary set of engravings depicting the deserters lodged in the Tower following the mutiny at Finchley in {EDIT:1745} 1743 I attach a later monochrome version.

Macdonnel 1745.jpg
Macdonnel 1745.jpg (57.41 KiB) Viewed 409 times


The only image of the original I have been able to lay eyes on is in Victoria Schofield's 'Highland Furies.'

In this link:

https://jacobitereenactors.wordpress.co ... regiments/

- you will see the same monochrome version of 'Macdonnel' together with a colour version of the print depicting one of his co-accused, Farquar Shaw, who was shot as a ringleader. As you can see the tartan was not painted from direct observation. I suspect much of the colouring was left to the discretion of the print makers. You will also see that the image of the piper with the Cross of St George pipe banner - and the free standing drones- was reproduced quite widely at the time.

The figure itself has been copied from the illustration of a Black Watch piper dated 1745 (WOAS) in Preben Kannik's Military Uniforms of the World (Blandford, 1968- the first uniform book I owned) which was evidently based on 'Macdonnel' complete with the 'Cross of St George' banner but with the plaid of invented yellow and red sett replaced by a version of Royal Stuart tartan, which was not adopted until the 1850s. I knew I 'd find a Victorian link!


Piper 42nd  - kannik.jpg
Piper 42nd - kannik.jpg (70.08 KiB) Viewed 409 times
Last edited by jf42 on 19 Nov 2017 15:30, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: 42nd Piper

Postby Frogsmile » 19 Nov 2017 09:06

Great detective work JF, and very interesting. I have heard of the 42nd’s mutiny around the time of ‘the 45’, but had not appreciated that they were in Finchley, of all places! One can just imagine the media of the day scrabbling around for images of the dastardly rebel Scots.
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Re: 42nd Piper

Postby jf42 » 19 Nov 2017 15:15

Some familiar images are imprinted on the memory. At first I was thought we were dealing with one of the naive illustrations of Liliane and Fred Funcken but after drawing a blank among the usual suspects, while contemplating the the stance of the piper in the OP one last time, the Kannik illustration just popped into my head and a quick rummage confirmed my recollection.

http://www.42ndrhr.org/mutiny.php

As for the Black Watch mutiny, it is a curious foreword to the history of so an illustrious corps as the 42nd RHR that the beginning of its service as an embodied regiment of the line should have been marked with this incident- which took place not in 1745, by the way (that would have set the cat among the pigeons), but in the spring of 1743. I have corrected the previous post.

As mutinies go, and compared to later troubles within Highland corps, it was a discreet and peacable affair.A hundred men or so simply slipped away one night with the intention of returning to Scotland, believing their terms of service had been breached and that they had been misled by the servants of the Crown into leaving Scotland and marching south, the intention being topack them off to die of fever in the West Indies. They had indeed been misled but most of all into believing that their enlistment was only for service in Scotland only. Regrettably, some of their officers were involved in the subterfuge, misrepresenting the terms of enlistment to men who spoke only Gaelic.

There was a considerable degree of sympathy for the deserters, who had caused no harm to persons or property in their brief progress northwards and surrendered peaceably when cornered by dragoons in Northamptonshire. The Highland Regiment had made a favourable impression in their march south and while encamped at FInchley were the objects of great curiousity among the local populace with people travelling from some distance to observe them. Hence the alleged portraits published were not of wild, cateran savages but of upright, soldierly figures in their exotic national garb.

Fortunately for the regiment, and the King's service, the blame for any duplicity was laid at the door of others and, with three so-called ringleaders shot and the other malcontents exiled or drafted into other regiments, the men of Semple's Highland Regiment were successfully transported to Flanders and their first rendezvous with the King's enemies at Fontenoy.

As ever, John Prebble had his own particular take on the story but he tells it well:
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=XFI ... r_versions
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Re: 42nd Piper

Postby Frogsmile » 20 Nov 2017 13:18

I do recall now that it was 1743, because I remember reading in Stuart Reid’s seminal work that the 42nd stayed loyal in the 45, but I had not read the full story that you refer to before. Again, interesting.
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