help with my grandfather

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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby crimea1854 » 29 Feb 2016 14:48

I have extracted the following from Brian Kaighin’s small paperback ‘A diary of the siege of Ladysmith’, produced as a result of his research into daily events during the siege:

Thursday 15th: There is the usual speculation on when Buller will arrive and there are several raffles going the rounds. ‘Long Tom’ active with shells landing close to the Convent. Fowls are selling for 16/- and upwards and jam at 30/- a tin. Some people spend the evening having small concerts where individuals sing and recite.

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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby RobD » 01 Mar 2016 18:43

If you can confirm he was with the Rifle Brigade, let me know; I can pop in to the Liddle Hart archive and look at RSM Jack Archer's diary and daily muster book and look for mention of your GF
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Pete Beach » 01 Mar 2016 21:43

Rob,
Yes, my grandfather was in the Rifle Brigade, 2nd Battalion. His # is 4555. Also confirming this is an article from The Times which simply states. "A. Butler, 2nd Rifle Brigade #4555 was severely wounded 2/15/00. The edition was published on 2/2/00 and his name appears along with several other British Soldiers also wounded during the Siege of Ladysmith.
I hope this helps. Please keep me advised as to your progress.
I appreciate your efforts in this matter.
Sincerely,
Pete
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Pete Beach » 16 Mar 2016 12:38

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I once again ask for your help. My grandfather, Albert Edward Butler was wounded (Severely) at the Siege of Ladysmith. From what my mother told me he was sent to the Isle of Wight to recover. I have Googled Military Hospitals on the Isle of Wight. Sent out several requests to one very likely candidate, but no response. Does anyone have an idea which Military Hospital my grandfather may have gone to??? Also ,with your patience, how would I locate his records ??? That is if they still exist??
Again many, many thanks to all who have helped me in the past.
Pete
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby SWB » 16 Mar 2016 20:38

Hello Pete

I don't know of any military hospitals on the Isle of Wight during this period, but the main Army hospital was at Netley which is just across the water on the mainland. Could this be where he was?

The hospital was called the Royal Victoria Hospital, most of it has been demolished. There is masses on the web about the hospital.

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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Pete Beach » 17 Mar 2016 17:00

Dear Meurig,
Greetings once again. Thank you for the info on the hospital where my grandfather may have been admitted. I shall once again pick up the chase and see where it will lead me.
I have to tell you....you folks on this site are truly "A BIT OF ALRIGHT " I say that because I appreciate all of the help and guidance given me in my quest.
Again thank you,
Kind regards,
Pete
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby RobD » 21 Apr 2016 18:31

Hello Pete,
I went through the muster book of Colour Sergeant Jack Archer (2nd Bn Rifle Brigade) recording his men, casualties, illnesses etc during the Siege of Ladysmith, and unfortunately it was a dead-end: your grandfather was not in his Company. Sorry to disappoint.
yours
Rob
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Pete Beach » 23 Apr 2016 15:17

Hello Rob,

I want to thank you for your research and efforts. I appreciate your help and info.
Hope you have a good day.

Pete
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Pete Beach » 26 Apr 2016 00:59

A good day to all.
I hate to ask this of you good and knowledgeable folks but I need a favor.
I am sure by now you all know that my grandfather was a Private in the Rifle Brigade during the 2nd Boer War. Can anyone send me a photo of what a privates strip from that period looks like. I have seen several for sale but some how they just did not look correct.
Again, thank you all for the valuable info. previously sent about my grandfather .
Have a good day.
Pete
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby RobD » 26 Apr 2016 10:04

Here are the Rifles entraining for Ladysmith, late Oct 1899
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Pete Beach » 27 Apr 2016 13:55

Dear Rob,

Thank you for the picture. I know my grandfather must be on that train somewhere. The look on the young faces waiting to board. Uncertainty, patriotic pride for Queen and Country, and quite possibly a tad of fear ...not knowing what lay ahead for them.
I once, many moons ago had a Lee Medford Rifle. I was much younger then and not into family History. Like all foolish young men, I was offered a fair price for the rifle and sold it. Ohh..... if I could only turn back the hands of time.
Thank you again for your courtesy.
Pete
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Pete Beach » 15 Dec 2016 21:07

Greetings from across the Big Pond!!! :)

I want to wish ALL of you good and kind folks on this web site a most Joyous and Happy Christmas. If it wasn't for the help you all so openly offered me in finding out about my grandfather who was in the Boer War, I would still be chasing rabbits down a hole.
May the joy of the season smile upon, and always be with you.
Ho! Ho ! Ho !

Pete
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Frogsmile » 23 Dec 2016 12:10

Pete Beach wrote:Ladies and Gentlemen,

I once again ask for your help. My grandfather, Albert Edward Butler was wounded (Severely) at the Siege of Ladysmith. From what my mother told me he was sent to the Isle of Wight to recover. I have Googled Military Hospitals on the Isle of Wight. Sent out several requests to one very likely candidate, but no response. Does anyone have an idea which Military Hospital my grandfather may have gone to??? Also ,with your patience, how would I locate his records ??? That is if they still exist??
Again many, many thanks to all who have helped me in the past.
Pete


There were some military hospitals on the Isle of Wight itself during the period concerned and I think it most likely that your ancestor was at the Albany Barracks Hospital as that was the location of an infantry unit. However, he might also have been at the Golden Hill Fort Hospital, which had not that long been built. The following information can be found online, under "Isle of Wight Hospitals":

Two small military hospitals were, for a time at least, well known on the Island; and the one at Albany Barracks (in Parkhurst) certainly played some part in the general life of the Island.

Albany barracks were built during the time of the Napoleonic wars, - around 1790. William B. Cooke in "A New Picture of the Isle of Wight" in 1808 wrote 'Not far from the House of Industry stands the barracks... Near it is the hospital containing a number of convenient wards, and nothing is wanting for the recovery and comfort of its afflicted inhabitants'. The Ordnance Survey Map of 1862 shows a building about 90ft x 40ft, and that of 1940 shows the same building but with additional wings on either side, and some smaller associated buildings; these occupied ground to the south-west of the main barracks and parade ground, which is now covered by a complex of roads and houses on the north side of the Forest Road; the military cemetery lies on the opposite side of the road, but in the early days there was also a small burial ground to the north-west close to the forest; what is not shown on the map is the nearby spot 'with an erected gallows, the common place of execution' which Cooke mentions.

The hospital would presumably have served whatever component of the Army was occupying the barracks at the time and possibly patients from other barracks on the Island. The Albany Barracks were abandoned some time in the 1960s and the hospital must have gone with them giving place to the high security prison at Albany.

The other hospital, at Golden Hill Fort had a shorter life than that at Albany. Details of the building and the history of the fort are given by Cantwell & Sprack in Solent Papers 2, from which this brief account is largely taken. The fort was built between 1863 and 1870, as a part of the defences against anticipated hostile attacks from the Continent, - a hexagonal building of two storeys, accommodating 8 officers, 128 other ranks, and with a hospital of 14 beds, on the south aspect of the upper storey, - as is indicated now in explanatory notices for visitors. Cantwell comments that there was a wind pump on the roof above so that the hospital cannot have been a very restful refuge.

Towards the end of the century the fort took on the function of the Western District School of Gunnery; new buildings were put up to the north of the fort and a new hospital was built on the far side of the main road leading from Yarmouth to Colwell and Totland. (See Fig. 12)

In Shipwrecks of the Wight J.C. Medland gives an account of the collision on 25th April 1908 in the Solent of the cruiser H.M.S. Gladiator and the American Express Mail Liner, St. Paul; and mentions that several survivors from the wreck were rescued by soldiers from Fort Victoria and taken to the Golden Hill Fort Hospital and treated there.

In 1912 two of the three blocks comprising the hospital were taken over to be used as quarters and as an officers' mess for the Royal Garrison Artillery.

The Army left the Fort and the associated buildings in 1962 and part of the of Hospital became a Masonic Lodge.
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Last edited by Frogsmile on 23 Dec 2016 17:37, edited 1 time in total.
sq
Relic of many a fight and siege and sack, it points a moral and adorns the back.
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby Pete Beach » 23 Dec 2016 16:42

Dear Frogsmile,

Thank you for the information on the hospitals, and the attached photos. I hope you and yours will have a very Merry Christmas.

Pete
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Re: help with my grandfather

Postby roconn » 27 Dec 2016 21:10

The pic of the soldiers with lee-metford rifles and entraining is labelled as "KRRC" (King's Royal Rifle Corps) a totally different regiment to the Rifle Brigade. Again, a regiment and neither a Corps nor a Brigade.

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