Canada’s, Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African War

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Canada’s, Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African War

Postby Spañiard » 16 Jul 2014 19:05

According to mainstream historians and see Wiki, :roll: lol: Lord Strathcona’s Horse, “boarded the SS Monterey, 537 officers and men, as well as 599 horses, of the new regiment sailed from Halifax on 18 March 1900 and arrived in Cape Town on 10 April. Along with The Royal Canadian Dragoons, for this reason, in August 1900, at the unit's own request, the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles were renamed the Royal Canadian Dragoons. In 1887 it was renamed the Royal School of Cavalry. In 1892 the regiment was renamed as the Canadian Dragoons and in 1893 it became The Royal Canadian Dragoons.”


In English, the above states, both sailed to SA at the sametime? I have accounts that differ, sailed on different date, not counting the SH reinforcements sent with numbers and date, aren’t included to the total, that served during the war. Consequently, when you add SH all ranks, that first sailed and reinforcements sent on a later date, = 599 all ranks, according to Col. E.J. Chambers’ account. Considered as, prime source: “The Canadian Forces in South Africa Sessional Paper No. 35a,” paints a slightly deferent picture, and since there’s a proper way of reading the Volumes, consisting of circa 15,000 pages for part of 1901. With over 1000 pages per Volume, note page 650, can be page 10 in South Africa papers or Militia section, you also have, Volumes with accounts from parliament in the house, etc. I looked in all appendixes, especially the “further supplementary report,” for add-ons, taken into consideration what’s in page 10, might have changes as the account progresses in p30, per say; and that’s where many Ph.Ds', dropped the ball, as proven in the 2nd Batt., SS RCRI account. The complete statistic sheet for First, Second contingents, etc, Ranks and file, KIA, DOW, DOD, invalided back to Canada, etc., with their names and No., are provided. The Statement list, excludes the 10th Field Hospital, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th CMR, and the Constabulary which wasn’t an authorised military force, nothing is mentioned for the exception, on the last page for 1901. The list provides a number count of men from each contingent once discharged, enlisted in other British Corps, for the Constabulary, only two officers and 28 other ranks of Canada’s contingents joined the police squad. For the authorised Militia force, total MIA is 2 file, ending 1900. In the 1902 parliament, and militia sessional papers, provide account, painted with a wide brush on the Constabulary, 2nd CMR, and 10 Field Hospital, no mention of 3-6 CMR, why?

Owing the Government was late sending the Furtherer Supplementary Report 35a 1902, etc., to the printers and only published in 1903 sessional paper, for the South African War, accounts. The first part of mainstream historical account of, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, was extracted from Lieut. –Col. S. B. Steele Account, the rest, I’ll let prime source, the sessional papers, first hand etc., support the facts from myth; I like to paint with a No. 1 pencil brush, filling in the details others missed, which require time and a delicate touch.




Some examples as fallows:-

Archives Canada.ca:
At his own expense, Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, Canada's High Commissioner to London, recruited a regiment of mounted rifles comprising 537 officers and men in Manitoba, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories. More than 1,000 men were thus recruited for a three-year term and organized into 12 platoons of South African police. Some of these recruits had been in earlier Canadian contingents and returned to service for Britain when their initial contracts expired. http://www.cmhg.gc.ca/cmh/page-582-eng.asp


AngloBoerWar.com:
Canadian units Strathcona's Horse: On 16th March the force embarked 28 officers, 512 of other ranks, with 599 horses, 3 maxims, 1 pom-pom, 500 rounds per rifle and 50,000 rounds for each maxim. A more munificent offer has seldom been made by a subject to his country. The regiment landed at Cape Town on 10th April. Unfortunately nearly 200 horses had been lost at sea, an unusually large proportion. (=540 all ranks).

Battlefields of Canada By Mary Beacock Fryer, p 242:
Then on 16 February it was the turn of 537 mounted men of Lord Strathcona’s Horse, raised in Manitoba to sail away.

Buckaroos and Mud Pups: The Early Days of Ranching in British Columbia
By Ken Mather, p 182:
On March 18th 537 officers and 599 horses sailed from Halifax.

According to E. J. Chambers’ 1904: Strathcona's Horse, 548 officers and men sailed on March 16. 1900. Draft to reinforce Strathcona's Horse, 51 officers and men, sailed on May 1. 1900, (= 599).



South Africa, Militia Orders, (MOs), for Lord Strathcona Horse’:

In the Second Anglo Boer War, Strathcona’s Horse, was authorised by MO No. 26/1900, on Feb 1st., 1900, embarked for South Africa by MO No. 69/1900, embarked and sailed on March 17th 1900, according to DHH; (note, DHH, Ph.Ds’, have dropped the ball on numerous accounts). In the British Army Official History: History of the South Africa 1899-1902, Vol. III pp.282-283, 382, 411, 459, and 511 provide account, part of the 3rd Mounted Brigade’ and 4th Infantry Brigade, II Division’ until its departure from the theatre of operations on Jan. 20th 1901. W.B. Fraser; Always a Strathcona, p3 states, the unit was disbanded on March 9th 1901.

The PF Regiment' origins, according to DHH, Ph.Ds, date back to July 1st 1901, at Winnipeg, Manitoba. The PAM, organised the formation of A Squadron, the Canadian Mounted Rifles, were authorised by GO 102/01. Redesignated: The Royal Canadian Mounted Rifles on Oct. 1st 1903 by GO 153/03; In perpetuation, Strathcona Horse' ( Royal Canadians), on Oct 1st 1909, by GO 111/09, and Lord Strachcona Horse' ( Royal Canadians)’ by GO 68/11, on May 1st 1911.



Lord Strathcona’s Horse’ of 1900-1901, Perpetuation.

Minutes of the Militia Council, 1904 and 1909. It was the intention of the Militia Council to form a unit designated, “Strathcona’s Horse” as part of the Permanent Force and that the proposed unit “should perpetuate the corps Lord Strathcona sent to South Africa.” Due to difficulties in identifying a suitable location for them in Western Canada, and Opposition “encountered in dealing with the question from the North-Western Mounted Police, and from other sources” (Report No. 12, Articles 380 to 383 of January 31st 1905), no decision was made until 1909. In that year the Adjutant-General recommended to the Council “to designate the Royal Canadian Mounted Rifles, “Strachcona’s Horse”, and to add another squadron in due time to be stationed west of Manitoba, a good one, and, in absence of more practicable scheme, he would like to see such a change made if agreeable to officers of the Royal Canadian Mounted Rifles” 9 Report No. 6, Articles 197 to 199 on March 3rd 19090. On March 16th 1909, it was decided that “the Adjutant-General should see the Military Secretary with the view to a designation being decided on which would meet with the approval of His Majesty the King” (Report No. 8, Article 281).



CANADIAN FORCES IN SOUTH AFRICA.
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a, p.18.


STRATHCONA HORSE.
The Right, Honourable Lord Strathcona having offered to raise a Regiment of Mounted Rifles in Canada for service in South Africa, and his patriotic offer having been accepted by Her late Most Gracious Majesty, Queen Victoria, the duty of supplying the necessary equipment was placed in the hands of the Store Branch. The men were concentrated in Ottawa, and were accommodated in the Central Canada Exhibition Association Buildings, liansdowne Park.

The equipment supplied differed but slightly from that issued to the Canadian Mounted Rifles, which formed part of the second Contingent. One pair of long boots, with laced insteps, made of brown leather by the Slater Company of Montreal, was issued instead of one pair of ankle boots and the jack spurs were provided with brown leather straps instead of black Revolvers, clothing and Tiecessaries were issued in Ottawa. The rifles and other supplies were sent on board the steamer at Halifax.

The expenses of the outfit was borne by Lord Strathcona, who expressed his entire satisfaction as to its completeness,

D. A. MACDONALD, Colonel,
Chief Supt. of Military Stores.



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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby Spañiard » 16 Jul 2014 19:11

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a, p.155.


LORD STRATHCONA'S HORSE.
The next corps to be organized in Canada for service in South Africa, Lord Strath cona's Horse, was recruited, horsed, armed, equipped, clothed, conveyed to South Africa, and paid until the date of arrival there, at the sole expense of Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, and the members thereof were also, from the date of arrival in South Africa, paid from Lord Strathcona's privy purse the difference between Imperial cavalry pay and the higher rates paid by Canada to the North-west Mounted Police Force. No corps left Canada, and it is doubtful whether there was any in the field in South Africa, so thoroughly clothed and equipped as that placed at the service of the Empire by Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal. It was, I am sure, a privilege and a pleasure to the officers of the Departments of Militia and Defence and of the North-west Mounted Police to assist in the organization of such a regiment.


ESTABLISHMENT.
The regiment consisted of a regimental staff and three squadrons, in accordance with the Army Establishment for a Cavalry Regiment, 1898. The regimental staff and detail of a squadron were the same as the Canadian Mounted Rifles (pages 69 and 70), with the exception that there were six drivers per squadron instead of four, and twelve draught horses per squadron instead of eight.


The establishment was therefore as follows:
Officers, 25; WO, 1; Saff & Sergt. 35; Aritifieers, 22; Transporters 6;
Ramk & File 448 = (537 all ranks).

Horses, Public: Riding 485, Draught 60, Pack 3, (= 548 horses).


ENROLMENT.
Lord Strathcona specially requested that the regiment should be recruited from Manitoba, British Columbia and the Nortn-west Territories. Recruiting was commenced on February 5, 1900, and the numbers enrolled at the different centres were as follows:


DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE.
64 VICTORIA, A. p.156, 1901.


North-west Territories: Moosomin, Regina, Prince Albert and Battleford, Calgary, Edmonton, Macleod, Pincher Creek, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat and Maple Creek,
Men; 40 40 40 40 40 40 20 20 20.

British Columbia: Fort Steele Nelson Golden Revelstoke Vernon Kamloops Vancouver Victoria Eastern Canada, artificers, 40 40 10 10 15 15 15 15 12.(Grand total, 512).

CONDITIONS.
The conditions under which men were enlisted were similar to those of the second contingent.

CONCENTRATION.
The regiment was concentrated at Ottawa by special trains, the first, having on board 6 officers, 280 non-commissioned officers and men, arriving on February 15.

OFFICERS.
Lieut. -Col. S. B. Steele, who was at Halifax, en route to South Africa as 2nd in Command of the 2nd Battalion C.M.R., was chosen as Commanding Officer. He and the officers selected for Commissions in this corps, were appointed to temporary rank in the army.

Colonel Lumsden's corps, raised in India, and Lord Strathcona's Horse, were the only corps specially raised for service in South Africa whose officers received this recognition.



The officers selected for commissions were as follows:

CO: Lieut. -Colonel S. B. Steele, (North-west Mounted Police).
Sec in Com: Major R. Belcher, (NWMP).
Majors:
A. E. Snyder, (NWMP), A. M. Jarvis R. C. Laurie (Lieut. Reserve of Officers).
Captains:
D. M. Howard (NWMP), G. W. Cameron (Major, 5th Batt.), F. L. Cartwright (NWMP)
Lieutenants:
R. H. B Magee (Lieut. Reserve of Officers), F. Harper (NWMP), J. A. Benyon (Capt., R CA), E. F. Mackie (Capt., 90th Batt.), P. Fall (2nd Lieut,, Manitoba Dragoons), M. H. White-Fraser (Ex-Inspector, NWMP); H. D. B. Ketchen (NWMP), J. F. McDonald (Captain, 37th Batt.), J. E. Leckie. R. M. Courtney (Captain, 1st Batt.), T. E. Pooley (Capt., 5th Regt., CA.), A. E. Christie; A. W. Strange; G. E. Laidlaw (Lieut, Reserve of Officers), G. H. Kirkpatrick, H. Tobin, same.

Quartermaster: W. Parker.
Transport Officer: I. R. Snider (2nd Lieut. Manitoba Dragoons).
Medical Officer: C. B. Keenan.
Veterinary Officer: S. T. Stevenson.



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a p.159.

On March 12th the regiment was moved to Halifax by special trains, where it arrived on the 15th. It embarked on the ss. Monterey for Cape Town on the following day at 5 o'clock p.m.


The marching out state was as follows :—

Strathcona's Horse: 28 officers, 512 other ranks, and 599 horses, being 3 officers and 51 horses in excess of the authorized strength. Three officers and 101 N.C. officers and men, being reinforcements for the 2nd S.S. Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment. Honorary Major J. L. Biggar, 15th "Argyll Light Infantry," to be attached to the Army Service Corps in the field. Major D. C. F. Bliss, R.O., to be attached to the 2nd Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles, with the rank of Lieutenant. Lieut, and Captain F. H. C. Sutton, R.C.D., to be attached to the 1st Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles, with the rank of Lieutenant. One civilian clerk.(=540 all ranks)


Reinforcements:
Subsequently, Lord Strathcona requested that an officers and 50 men be sent out as reinforcements for his corps.
(=51 All ranks).

Captain Agar S. A. M. Adamson, The G.G.F.G., was selected as the officer. The men, like those of the regiment who preceded them, were, with few exceptions, recruited from Manitoba, British Columbia and the North-west Territories, and under the same conditions as regards pay, qualifications, &c. The detachment arrived at Ottawa on April 25. They were clothed and equipped, and left for Montreal, April 30, where they embarked, on May 1st, on the ss. Vancouver for Liverpool







Lieut. –Col. S. B. Steele Account:

The recruiting stopped on February 9, the regiment was complete on March 7, and a mounted parade was ordered for that day for inspection by His Excellency the Governor General, a flag on behalf of the citizens of the town of Sudbury was presented to the regiment. On the 8th the regiment again paraded mounted and marching through the streets to the Parliament grounds was presented by Mrs. Borden, on behalf of the ladies of the Civil Service at Ottawa, with four beautifully worked guidons, a gift very much appreciated by the officers, non-commissioned officers and men of the corps. Monday the 12th was the day named for the departure of the regiment for Halifax, and as it was necessary to start early the horses where all loaded on the 11th. Entrained at 10 o'clock and moved out amidst the encouraging cheers of the large number of people who had come to see them off. Arriving at Montreal at 3 p.m. met with a most enthusiastic reception. The corps entrained again at 10 p.m. and reached Halifax on the morning of March 15. On the 16th, at 3 p.m., the regiment was paraded and drawn up en masse in the drill hall and were inspected by Lt. Gen. Lord Wm. Seymour, commanding the troops in British North America. After the inspection the regiment marched through the streets, headed by the whole garrison, to the ship and immediately embarked. A few minutes later, amidst the greatest enthusiasm possible, the ship pulled out in the stream, where she remained until the following day. (On the 16th they boarded at 5 pm, pulled out of the docks, remaining in the stream, on the 17th set sail for Cape Town).

The voyage from Halifax to Cape Town was marked by splendid weather "not a rough sea was experienced during the whole of it "but the enjoyment was marred to a large extent by the worry and sorrow brought about by the loss of so many of our horses. It was found after one or two days out that a great many of the horses were unable to stand the decided change of climate between the prairie country and Ottawa and between the latter city and Halifax. The slight colds contracted soon developed, and before many days, in spite of everything that could be done, we found ourselves with an epidemic of pneumonia amongst the animals. 176 horses died during the voyage.

The ship arrived in Table Bay on the 10th of April and we disembarked the following day, going into camp on Green Point Common. (They arrived on the 10th at Table Bay, which forms the harbour for the city of Cape Town. The bay extends from Melkbosstrand and north from Cape Town being, 9 km (6 mi) wide, and 19 km (12 mi) long, the troops reached the docks and disembarked (landed) on the 11th of April).


Returning back to Canada:
We arrived at Cape Town on the 20th and immediately embarked on the “Lake Erie” for London. Before sailing, I called on the High Commissioner, Sir Alfred Milner, who spoke very highly of the services rendered to the Empire by Lord Strathcona’s Horse.

The weather was fine during the whole of the voyage, and. with the exception of six cases of enteric fever which developed on the ship, there was no sickness at all. Arriving at Gravesend on the 13th February, the men suffering from enteric fever were taken off and placed in hospital, and as this took considerable time, the ship missed the tide and we were obliged to remain there all day i was met here by several of the members of the Colonial Entertainment Committee, who submitted a magnificent programme for the entertainment of the regiment in England. T also received orders that the regiment would be employed on arrival in the morning in lining the streets through which His Majesty the King would drive in proceeding to Westminster to open his first Parliament. The honour of being allowed to take some small part in this historic event was fully appreciated by all ranks.

On our arrival at the Royal Albert docks on the 14th, the corps immediately disembarked and proceeded by train to Kensington Barracks, from where we marched to Pall Mall, taking up a position there.

A number of men remained in England on furlough, the remainder sailing from Liverpool on the “Numidian” on the 23rd, arriving at Halifax on the 9th, after a stormy passage. The regiment left Halifax on the same day, and along the route from there to Ottawa we were met by large numbers of people who wished to welcome us home. At Moncton, I was presented with an address from the loyal people of that town. Arriving at Montreal on the morning of the 11th, the regiment was received by the band of the Garrison Artillery and by a great many citizens.

All ranks are deeply grateful to yourself and the members of the Military Staff for the kindness extended during the organization of the regiment here, and since that time, to Lord Strathcona, who has been kindness itself.

I have the honour to be, sir, Your obedient servant:
Lt.-Col. S.B. Steele.



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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby Spañiard » 16 Jul 2014 19:12

APPENDIX G (l).

The following is taken from the London Gazette of February, 1901, being an extract from a despatch of General Sir Redvers BuUer, dated November 9, 1900:—

LORD STRATHCONA’S HORSE.
Joined the Force in June, and from the moment of their arrival, they served with marked success. I can hardly speak too highly of the value Strathcona's Horse have been to the Natal Field Force.

Lieut. -Colonel S. B. Steele, commanding, has great influence with all ranks in his regiment. Having a thorough knowledge of frontier work, his services have been most valuable. Major A. M. Jarvis, Major R. Belcher, Captain and Adjutant E. F. Mackie, and Lieutenant R. H. B. Magee, have done excellent service throughout, and proved themselves most useful soldiers in every duty they were called upon to perform.

The following warrant and non-commissioned officers and men have been brought
to my notice as having specially distinguished themselves:—


Regimental Serjeant-Major J. Hynes.
No. 517 Sergeant H.W. Nelles.
No. 87 Armourer-Sergeant J. R. Brigham.
No. 457 Corporal A. K. McLellan.
No. 35 Private C. W. Rooke.
No. 476 Private G. Gamsby.
No. 362 Private W. F. Graham.
No. 98 Private A. C. Garner.

"The remark I have made about the South African Light Horse applies equally in
this case, and I subjoin a list of names :—


Major A. E. Snyder.
Captain G. W. Cameron.
Captain F. L. Cartwright.
Lieut. F. Harper.
Lieut. J. A. Benyon.
Lieut. P. Fall.
Lieut. J. F. Macdonald.
Lieut. J. E. Leckie.
Lieut. T. E. Pooley.
Lieut. A. E. Christie.
Surgeon-Lieut. C. B. Keenan.
Lieut. W. Parker (Quartermaster).
Lieut. E. J. Snider (Transport Officer).
Lieut. E. J. Steele (Paymaster).
Lieut. A. McMillan (Veterinary Officer).
Lieut. A. H. L. Kyle (attached).
Civil Suro-eon A. E. Houseman.
No. 459 Squadron Sergeant-Major Richards.
No. 462 Sergeant-Trumpeter J. Farmer.
No. 49 Sergeant R. H. Moir.
No. 260 Farrier Sergeant A. Gillies.
No. 468 Sergeant J."s. Lambert.
No. 49 Segt. G. Clarke.
No. 269 Segt. C. A. W. Whitehead.
No. 3L5 Segt. S. A. Kelly.
No. 314 Segt. P. G. Routh.
No. 15 Cpl. E. H. Clarke.
No. 102 Cpl. Alex. Norquay.
No. 207 Cpl. W. M. Lafferty.
No. 492 Cpl. F. Mulligan.
No. 337 Cpl. C. R. McDonald.
No. 328 Cpl. R. N. Grogan.
No. 457 Cpl Read.
No. 85 Pte J. E. V. Capenter.
No. 204 Pte. C. E. Kindrew.
No. 292 Pte. R. Hammond.
No. 155 Pte. H. D. Saxby.
No. 135 Pte. A. W. Stewart.
No. 490 Pte. J. T. Waite.
No. 506 Pte. J. Devine.
No. 264 Pte. S. A. White.
No. 286 Pte. R Bearing.
No. 346 Pte. T. M. L, Pym.




SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a, APPENDIX G (2) p.178-179.
The complete list of names enrolment No., are provided, breakdown in brief:


Nominal Roll of NCOs’ and men of LSH, KIA, or DOW, = 12.
Nominal Roll of NCOs’ and men of LSH, DOD, = 14.
Nominal Roll of NCOs’ and men of LSH, WIA, = 24.




"A" Squadron:
Elliott, F., R.S.M. Crafter, A.G., Q.M.S. McMillan A.F., Q.M.S. Hooper R.C.L., S.S.M. Albert,E.
Anderson E.F. Archer, W. Arnold, F.G. Baker, W.G. Barker, M. Barker, W.J. Barrett, J. Bastien,
H. Beckitt, F.W. Bennett, J. Bland, E.M. Bourne, R. Bradbury, J. Bride, F. Brigham, J.R. Brooks,
W. Brown, A.M. Bullough, J. Burton, A.E. Campbell, M.G. Carpenter, J. Carroll, P.E. Carson,
T.L. Cassidy, H.E. Clark, G. Clark, E.H. Common A. Cosens, F.C. Currie, W.E.E. Cuthbert,
W. Dandy, C.R. Daykin, A.U. Deaeon, B.L. Dingan, A. Dickson, J. Dodd, G.S. Doherty, G.H. Donnan,
J.W. Drever, A. Dunsford, H. Dunsmore F.C. Edwards, E.H. Ewing, A. Evans, J. Farmer, J.T. Fisher,
C.W.D. Fletcher, R. Flotten, P. Fraser, R.N.Gammond, C. Garner, A.G. Gilroy. H. Glass, N. Goodburn,
0. Gooding, J.E.P. Gordon, R. Gowler, A.W. Gregory, T. Grestock, H. Griffith, J.J. Gurney, W.B.L. Harley,
J.A. Harris, M.R. Hathorne, W. Hazeldine, F.R. Henderson J.J. Hogarth, W.R. Hudson, W. Inkster,
J. Irwin, H.M. Irwin, F. Jackson, W.P.Johnston, J.D. Keeling, J.H. Kempster, H. Kermode, J.O. King,
W.J. Kirkpatrick, A. Lambert, J.S. Lamont, B. Locke, C. Lorsch, A.B. Lowe, A.A.R. Lyle, H. Macdonnell,
K.C. Machen, S.R. Martin, R.W. Matthews, F.A.W. Maveety, J.D. McAlonen, R. McArthur, J.H. McGillvray,
A. McLaren, G. McLean, G. McLeod, W.R. McLoy, J. McNaught, J.Y. Mills, T. Milligan, W. Moberley,
G.A. Morrison, J.H. Munroe, S. Murphy, W.M. Neville, F. Nicks, J. Norquay, A. Norris, F. Nyblett,
R.W. Orr, F.W. Page, C.F. Palmer, P.S. Palmer, G.S. Parker, H. Parker, J. Perkins, G. Powell,
F.N. Ramsay, D. Reid, J. Richardson, A.H.L. Robinson, A. Rooke, C.W. Rooke, R.P. Ross, J.T. Rushe,
M.J. Sabine, H.E. Sawyer W.L. Saxby, H.B. Sayce, W. Scott, L.B. Scott, W. Skirving, G.M. Smith,
R.W. Sinnington A. Stanier, C.Y. Starke, T.B. Steadman, C.D. Stevenson, A.T. Stocker, J.R. Stuart,
A.W. Stutt, W. Sutherland, A. Terry, N.F. Thompson, H.C. Thorne, A. Thornton E. Thomas,
C.F. Townsend, P.H. Traill, W. Treaton, J. Trelevan, A. Van Stan, A. Wade, R. Ward, J. Watson,
A. Webb, E. Webb, H. Wemyss, D.N. Wilkins, H. Wyndham, H.S. Zimmer, W.J.


"B" Squadron:
Steele, S.J., S.S.M. A'Court, A.W.H. Abbott, W.R. Allison, D. Anderson, J.L. Armstrong, J.F. Armstrom,
J.E. Banks, E.M. Bannes, P. Barton, M.E. Beaumont, T.E. Bentham, W. Beresford, W.P. Binfham,
H.B. Bertram, C.F. Blick, C.A. Bradley, R.H. Brothers, J. Brown, H.S. Brown, A.S. Bull, J.V Burdett,
A.H. Burgess, D. Callin, T.A. Campbell, N.M. Carson, W. Clayton, A. Condon, F.B. Corbett, W. Cronyn,
E.S. Cross, J.R. Crozier, J.A. Cruikshank, C. Cumming, F. Dalglish, A. Deane, J. Dick, M.F. Dickinson,
D. Donaldson, A.S. Douglas, F.C.A. Down, G. Dupen, A.E. Dunn, F.J. Eastmead, - Edmunds, T.L. Edwards,
A.J. Edwards, R.H. Fawcett, N. Fennell, - Flintoff, W. Ford, J. Fortey, A. Freezer, J.R. Gamsby,
G. Ganesford, W.F. Gillies, A. Gilmour, J.F. Grobil, A.C. Graham, C.H. Grey, W. Hall, A. Hardwick,
M.D.K. Hardy, A. Hart, C.A. Haylett, J. Hayes, R.P. Hicks, R.C. Hobson, J. Inglis, R.C. Irwin, H. Jackson,
H. Jameson, T. Jenkins, A. Kerr, G.T. Kindrew, C.E. Lafferty, W. Laidlaw, C.E. Lamb, A. Leder, B. Lee,
H.A. Lewis, T.A. Lewis, F.C. Lindsay, A.P. Linton, R. Loney, M.F. Lowry W.A. Lowe, S. Lynch, W.G. Macdonald,
J.R. Macdonald, A.D. Madge F.T. Mansell, M. Martin, H. Martin, L.A. Matallal, A. McDonald, G.A. McDonald,
R.S. McClay, R. McCormack, E. McMillan, T. McNichol A. McNair, E.W.C. McNell, F.J. McRae, D. McElray,
G.E. McIntosh, E. McKeage, F.O.E.McKinley, M. McKugo, G. Miller, A. Milne, A.Mitchell. G. Mo1r, R.H. Mulligan,
F. Murphy, E.D. Newman F.G. Niblock B.L. Nichol, H.F. Nichol D. Paul, J.Pearce, R.G. Pearce, E.J. Pearson,
A. Pinder, E.G.J. Percy, H.N. Perry, T. Peyto, E.W. Phillips, J.W. Pillans R.B. Playfair, W.S. Poole, H. Poole,
F. Purvis, A.S. Quick, H.H. Rackharn W. Reed, W.E. Rice-Jones I.E.C. Robson, J.S. Rogers, H.M. Ross,
A.M. Routh, G.F. Saddington, W. Scott, H.H. Scott, F.W. Shuckburgh, W.C. Sharples, W.A. Shaw, C.W. Shiles,
T. Simpson, T. Skinner, A. Smiley, S. Smith, J. Somerton, W. Spratt, A. Stewart, J.S. Stranger, B. Swanston,
C. Sutherland, R. Thomas, G.D. Thompson, F. Tegart, H. Townshend, N.S. Tucker, P.H. Vernon, A.A. Walte,
J.T. Walker, J.C. Walker, B.G. Watts, C.C.M. Watts, A.H. White, S.A. Watson, A. Whiteley, F.C. Whitehead,
C.A.W. Wilby, A.W.R. Wilkln, W. Watson, B. Wilson, F. Wilson, D. Williams, T.H.A. Woods, W.T. Woodward,
W. Woodward, A.J. Wragge, E.C. Wright, T.W.H. Wright, H.H. Wyse, D. Yemen, N.W. Yule, H.



"C" Squadron
Hynes, J., S.S.M. Abbott, J. Afar, G.S. Albert G. Allan, P.K. Armstrong, J.W. Bell, P.W.W.
Bell, W.H. Bolton, N.T. Bonner, L.A. Bousfieid, J. Bowers, G.A. Brent, W. Brixton, J.
Broadbent, E.R. Burke, B. Cameron, N.C.J. Castelaine, L. Chancellor, E.V. Childers, N.C.
Clarke, W.F. Cochrane, R.L. Cook, W. Cotterill, C.W. Cree, A.if Curtis, E.F.E. Custance, T.F.M.
Daley, H.M. D'Amour, A.P. Dawson, W.H.N. Davis, R.S. Deering, R. Duncan, C.J. Dnnn, F.T.
Dunn, T. Edwards, W. Elliott, J. Ellis, F.W. Eyre, G. Fader, G.J. Fall, C.S. Fanning, W.
Faulder E.R. Fernie, W.L. Fernle, M. Fisher, J.C. Foster, J.M. Fraser, J.A. Fraser, H.
Fraser, W. Fuller, J.W. Fuller, J. Halcro, A.J. Hall, A. Hambly, G. Hammond, R.B.L.
Harding, J.E. Harper, W.H. Harris, C.C. Harris, C.B. Hawes, H. Haynes, W.T. Hazel, G.
Hicks, H.J. Hirsch, J. Hulbert, T. Humfrey, W.H. Hunter, T.T. Graham, F. Giffin, J.
Grogan, R. Ingram, H. Jackson, C.F. Johnson, A.W. Johnston, H.R. Jones, A. Jones, E.E.
Kearney, J.W. Kelly, S.A.J. Kennedy, J. Kerr, F. Ledingham, G.W. Lee, B.H. Lefloy, L.B.
Lindsay, W.E. Lockhart, F.C. Logan, A.E.H. Malalue, J.H. McAllister, D. McDonald, A.
McDonald, G.A. McDonnell, C.R. McDuff, J. McKenzie, A.W. McMullen, J.H. McRae, D.J.
McCullough, R.J. Melton, E.J. Monteith, W.E. Morgan, H.E. Murray, E. Murray, J.W.
Nash, J.F.P. Nesbitt, J.L. Nicholson, C.J. Norton, F. Norton, C. Noury, H.W. O'Brien, A.
Ogilby, L. O'Hearn, W. Oldham, P. Orchard, E.A. Palmer, R.H. Parkes, F.C. Pearson, A.C.
Peterson, C. Parham, H.J. Pettigrew, J. Pinkerton, T.A. Powell, C.J. Press, A. Pym, T.M.L.
Radwell, A. Rennie, C. Robson, W. Routh, P. Ryan, J. St. George, B.A. Seymour, E. Shaw, R.
Shaw, A.J.M. Stilling1leet, H.C. Simon, A.B.J. Skene, J.G. Simpson, P.E. Spencer, J. Squires, C.
Strickland, C.S. Swift, T. Switzer, P. Simmill, J. Swinburn, A. Tennant, C. Thomas, I.
Thomas H. Tuson, J. Venner, R.P. Warren, F.F. West, W. Wiggins, H.J. Wilkie, J.H.
Winearls, R.A. Winkle, W.C. Wright, S. Woodhouse, F.W.B.



Reinforments for Strathcona's Horse:
Lt. Adamson Anderson, G. Andrews, A.M. Bartram, W.B. Blakmore, P.H.J. Bruce, G.B.
Buchanan, J.J. Burnet, D. Campbell, T.G. Campbell, W.J. Clampitt, J.H. Carey, S.T.
George-, Cooke, J.T. Della-Torre, W.J. Fowler, W.R. Gilbertson, J.E. Greaves, J.B.
Green-Armytage, H.R. Grey, C. Griffith, W.R. Hall, C.L. Henaerson, T.A. Heron, R.B.
Heygate W.A.N. Howell, T.E. Hunt, W.de Vere Hutchison, W. Isbester, C.J. Macdougall, J.G.
Malet, C.C. Martin, J.S. McArthur, A. McDougall, J.B. McMillan, C.W. Morris, C. Myers, L.
Palmer, W. Paton, S.C. Preston, A.J. Robertson, D. Robinson, H.L. Rose, D.W. Ritchie, D.V.
Shuttleworth, P.P. Slocock, E.F. Smith, W. Sparkes,F.D. Sparks, G.A.S. Stewart, D.M.
Stringer A. Tucker, R.





SVP, Still poking at it, see what else comes out of the bag.



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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby QSAMIKE » 17 Jul 2014 00:53

S T R A T H C O N A’ S H O R S E

Regimental Order

-0-0-0-0-0



Halifax, 15th March 1900
By Lt. Col. Steele, Commanding, Strathcona’s Horse

R.O. 119– 15-03-1900

The following special service officers proceeding to South Africa on the S.S. Monterey are attached to the Regiment for duty.

Major Bigger to be attached to the Army Service Corps for instructional purposes with the rank of Major.

Major D. C. F. Bliss to be attached to the 2nd Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles for duty with the Machine Gun Section with the rank of Lieutenant.

Lieutenant and Captain F. H. C. Sutton, Royal Canadian Dragoons, with the rank of Lieutenant.

By Order
J. D. Irving, Lt. Col D.O.C.

R.O. 120– 15-03-1900

The following cable dispatch is published for the information of all ranks.

Following telegram sent by Lord Strathcona to Colonel Steele:-

"Very sorry cannot see my force embark. Have transmitted to Dr. Borden gracious message I have received from Her Majesty which he will publicly convey to you and the men under your command. Have also asked him express my best wishes to all of you that you may have a pleasant voyage, every success and safe return. Appointments of all officers gazetted and they will receive their acting commissions from the Queen. Hope to forward them so as to reach you arrival South Africa where in any case you will find a letter. Immediately on arrival report yourself to the General Officer Commanding Cape Town."

R.O. 121– 15-03-1900

The Regiment will parade immediately after lunch today for examination by the Medical Officer commencing with “A” Squadron.

R.O. 122– 15-03-1900

The Regiment will parade on foot at 2 p.m. at the Armoury under command of the Officer commanding and for inspection by the Lieut. General Commanding in North America.

Dress – Serge frocks and breeches, boots, cloaks, hats and haversacks.

R.O. 123– 15-03-1900

W. Gunn Esq., Vt. Surg., is attached to the regiment for duty to assist Lieut. Vety. Surgeon Stevenson during the voyage, from Halifax.

R.O. 124– 15-03-1900

The following is published for the information of the Corps.

Distribution of Quarters for the Rank and File of the Strathcona’s Horse and draft for the Second Special Service Battalion.

Strathcona’s Horse

Number 2 Hold

A and B Squadrons less six (6) men to go in Number 2 hold. Hammocks Nos. 109 to 378 = 270, Mess tables 7 to 21 each table accommodating 12 men.

Number 3 Hold

C Squadron with balance of six (6) men from B Squadron and Artificers. Hammocks Nos. 379 to 584 = 206. Mess tables 22 to 32.

Number 1 Hold

Special Service Battalion. Hammocks 1 to 100 = 100. Artificers from Strathcona’s Horse. Hammocks Nos. 1 to 100 = 100. Mess tables 1 to 8.

Recapitulation :- Strathcona’s Horse

No. 2 Hold - 270 men and hammocks
No. 3 Hold - 198 men and 206 hammocks
No. 1 Hold - Spl. Svc. Bn. and artificers men and hammocks 108

(signed) S. J. R. Sircom, Major
Embarkation Officer

R.O. 125– 15-03-1900

The following district orders are published for guidance of the corps:

Headquarters Military District No. 9
Halifax, N.S., 15th March, 1900

District Orders – 96

Inspection

1. Referring to Embarkation Orders s.s. Monterey, the troops therein detailed to embark en route to South Africa will parade in the Armoury building tomorrow at 2 p.m. and will be inspected by the Lieut. General Commanding in British North America.

Formation

2. The parade will be formed up facing the north entrance of the building, Strathcona’s Horse in half Squadron column, draft for the 2nd Bn (S.S.) R.C.R., in line on the left flanks inward.

3. The bands of the Leinster Regiment, and the City Corps will be formed up in the rear of the center and after the inspection play it to the steamer.

Embarkation

4. After inspection the troops will be marched to the dry dock and there embarked on the s.s. Monterey. The rout will be – Cunard, Gottinghon, Cogswell, Brunswick, Jacob, Argyle, Buckingham, Barrington, Morris, Hollis, George, Granville, Buckingham, Lookman Streets, Campbell road to Dry Dock.

Escort

5. The O.C. the 63rd Halifax Rifles Battalion and the 66th Princess Louise Fusiliers having intimated that they will each furnish a detachment of their command to act as escort, they will parade at the time and form up in line on the common facing the west entrance of the Armoury, and will accompany the troops for South Africa to the ship. The escourt will be under command of the Senior Officer present with the detachment on duty which will act independently under his orders and as pre-arranged by him. Dress at the direction of the C.O.

Baggage

6. All regimental baggage is to be collected and placed on the baggage waggons (which will be provided by the Superintendent of Stores) by 10 a.m. Officers will arrange to have their baggage collected and ready at the “Halifax” and “Queens” Hotels where it will be called for by a teamster provided by the Superintendent of Stores.

Officers

7. It is expected that all Officers of City Corps of active Militia who can make it convenient will attend the parade placing themselves in rear of the saluting point. Uniform Winter Kit. Officers in uniform will be admitted to the dry dock.

By Order
(signed) Fred H. Vecky, Lieut. Col.
Acting D.S.O., No 9

R.O. 126– 15-03-1900

Orderly Officer for tomorrow Lieut. Courtney, next for duty Lieut. Leckie.

R.O. 127– 15-03-1900

It must be distinctly understood that smoking between decks on the boat is absolutely forbidden. A place will be provided for this purpose and only covered pipes only will be permitted at any time.


By Order
(signed) E. F. Mackie, Lieut.
Actg. Adgt
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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby QSAMIKE » 17 Jul 2014 00:55

After Orders by Lt. Col. Steele
Commanding


On Board s.s. Monterey

16th March 1900

R.O. 128– 16-03-1900

Non Commissioned officers and men other than Sergeants and senior Non-Com. Officers are distinctly prohibited from using the passage of the saloon or Officers quarters unless on duty.

R.O. 129 – 16-03-1900

In future batmen must report to their Officers whose servants they are at 8 a.m. daily and received their orders for the day

R.O. 130 – 16-03-1900

Until further orders the following will be the daily routine :-

Reveille - 6.00 a.m.
Stables - 6.30 a.m.
Breakfast - 8.00 a.m.
Officers Breakfast - 8.30 a.m.
Orderly Room - 11.00 a.m.
Stables - 11.00 a.m.
Dinner - 12.00 a.m.
Officers Lunch - 1.00 p.m.
Stables - 4.15 p.m.
Supper - 5.00 p.m.
Officers Mess - 7.00 p.m.
Lights Out - 10.15 p.m.

R.O. 131 – 16-03-1900

N. C. Officers and men will parade daily until further orders for inspection by the Medical Officer at 9.30 a.m.

R.O. 132 – 16-03-1900

It must be distinctly understood that all quarters marked for N. C. Officers are for the use of Sergeants only and not for any junior ranks, other ranks are absolutely forbidden to use these quarters.

R.O. 133 – 16-03-1900

All ranks must distinctly understand that smoking is forbidden except in own quarters and on top deck and then only with covered pipe.

R.O. 134 – 16-03-1900

The Quartermaster will immediately have the pipes and tobacco pouches presented by Lord Strathcona issued.

By Order
(signed) E. F. Mackie, Lieut.
Actg. Adgt.
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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby Spañiard » 17 Jul 2014 17:04

[quote="QSAMIKE"]S T R A T H C O N A’ S H O R S E

Regimental Order

-0-0-0-0-0




Thank you for your contribution Mr Mike, providing the ROs’ for Lord Strathcona Horse’, is appreciated. Will provide interested individuals, history students, with more information concerning, Canada’s LSH account in the SSAW.

THK U FR YR TME.

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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby GrantRCanada » 18 Jul 2014 07:39

Is it not relevant to some of the issues raised in this thread that, despite being recruited in Canada, Strathcona's Horse was raised, and served, as a British Army regiment ... not as a Canadian unit? The later Canadian unit commemorating the name was a separate and distinct entity.

In that regard, the title of the topic, and some of the posts, are a bit misleading in referring to "Lord Strathcona's Horse". The short-lived South African War unit raised by Donald Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, was simply "Strathcona's Horse" throughout its brief existence .... it was not until 1911 that the word "Lord" finally became part of the name of the later Canadian unit.
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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby Spañiard » 18 Jul 2014 15:50

GrantRCanada wrote:Is it not relevant to some of the issues raised in this thread that, despite being recruited in Canada, Strathcona's Horse was raised, and served, as a British Army regiment ... not as a Canadian unit? The later Canadian unit commemorating the name was a separate and distinct entity.

In that regard, the title of the topic, and some of the posts, are a bit misleading in referring to "Lord Strathcona's Horse". The short-lived South African War unit raised by Donald Smith, 1st Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, was simply "Strathcona's Horse" throughout its brief existence .... it was not until 1911 that the word "Lord" finally became part of the name of the later Canadian unit.



Hi, some of the issues raised are relevant, even though U have a deference of opinion, numerous Canadian historians’ state this was Canada’s 3rd contingent, which I think not. They were raised in Canada and privately funded in Canada, until SA even though Strathcona payed the defrence, served under the British Army, later perpetuated by a Canadian Unit.


In that regard, the title of the topic, and some of the posts, are a bit misleading in referring to "Lord Strathcona's Horse".


Which posts are misleading in reference to Lord Strathcona Horse’??

I posted the Gov sessional paper, which provides the facts instead of Historian recycled accounts.



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a, p.155.


LORD STRATHCONA'S HORSE.
The next corps to be organized in Canada for service in South Africa, Lord Strathcona's Horse, was recruited, horsed, armed, equipped, clothed, conveyed to South Africa, and paid until the date of arrival there, at the sole expense of Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, and the members thereof were also, from the date of arrival in South Africa, paid from Lord Strathcona's privy purse the difference between Imperial cavalry pay and the higher rates paid by Canada to the North-west Mounted Police Force. No corps left Canada, and it is doubtful whether there was any in the field in South Africa, so thoroughly clothed and equipped as that placed at the service of the Empire by Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal. It was, I am sure, a privilege and a pleasure to the officers of the Departments of Militia and Defence and of the North-west Mounted Police to assist in the organization of such a regiment.




In the 1901 sessinoal paper, known as LORD STRATHCONA'S HORSE, however since we are splitting a hair, and in Steel's account Strathcona's Horse, I changed my header to, "Canada’s, Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African War."


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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby QSAMIKE » 18 Jul 2014 15:55

Gentlemen.....

In fact when the unit arrived in South Africa the British staff re-named the regiment "Strathcona's Mounted Infantry"......

In the Steele papers there are letters where he demanded that they be known as "Strathcona's Horse"......
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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby Spañiard » 18 Jul 2014 16:00

QSAMIKE wrote:Gentlemen.....

In fact when the unit arrived in South Africa the British staff re-named the regiment "Strathcona's Mounted Infantry"......

In the Steele papers there are letters where he demanded that they be known as "Strathcona's Horse"......



You got that right, after the British renamed them, Steele demaded they be known as, Strathcona's Horse.

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Re: Canada’s, Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African War

Postby Spañiard » 18 Jul 2014 16:41

From LAC:

In January 1900, Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal (Donald Alexander Smith) raised a mounted infantry unit, recruited from western Canada, and sent it to South Africa at his own expense. Lieutenant-Colonel Sam Steele of the N.W.M.P. was appointed to command the Strathcona's Horse. The regiment arrived in Cape Town on 10 April 1900. It took part in seven major actions as part of the Earl of Dundonald's 3rd Mounted Brigade and received its baptism by fire on Dominion Day, 1 July, 1900. The regiment embarked at Cape Town on 20 January 1901 and on 14 February arrived in London.

Although the unit itself was disbanded, remnants from it formed "A" Squadron, the Canadian Mounted Rifles on 1 July 1901. This unit, which traced its origins to 1883 and which had ties to the Royal Canadian Dragoons, was renamed The Royal Canadian Mounted Rifles in 1903. Six years later it was decided to revive the title of the Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians). In 1911 this title was amended to Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians).

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/pam_ ... nbr=182371




The Regimental Birthday

Although the lineage of the Regiment dates back to the creation of the School of Mounted Infantry in 1885 and subsequently the Canadian Mounted Rifles and The Royal Canadian Dragoons, the birth date of the Strathcona's is considered to be 1 February 1900. This was the day on which the Regiment was authorized to be formed with the publication of Militia General Order No. 26. The Regimental birthday is celebrated in conjunction with "Strathcona Day" which is the day the Melfa River Crossing is honoured, this is usually held on or close to 24 May each year, but it is however subject to training and operational commitments.

http://www.strathconas.ca/the-regiment




By early 1900, the war in South Africa pitting the resident Boers against the British invaders was not going as well for England as might be expected. Though generally outnumbered, the Boer farmers and ranchers fought a type of small, independent “guerilla” warfare that seemed to handcuff the British troops, causing numerous losses with little success.

Men were needed, men who could both ride and shoot well and who could give back the Boers some of their own medicine. Lord Strathcona (Donald Alexander Smith) offered to personally finance and equip a mounted infantry regiment of Canadian volunteers. The force, to be known as the Strathcona Horse, was to include 504 men, 42 officers and 548 horses. He asked Superintendent Samuel B. Steele of the North West Mounted Police to serve as commanding officer. Steele promptly agreed and, following the insertion of ads in all Western Canadian newspapers, opened numerous recruiting stations from Manitoba to the Yukon, including Fort Steele.

Volunteers were required to sign up for six months (or one year, if required) and, according to Lt. Col. Steele, only the “the most respectable character to be taken, such as would pass into the NWMP.”

As early as Jan. 18, 1900, a concert was held in Forrest Hall (later the Wentworth/Allan Hotel, now the 9th Ave. connector) to raise money for South African volunteers from the city. Although the event was hastily prepared it was a great success with speeches and entertainment given to a crowded and generous house. Towards the end of the show, in true English music hall fashion, Miss Magee sang the patriotic “Pay, Pay, Pay” while the hat was passed, raising $192 (over $5,000 today).

A paper circulated throughout the town exploited the local patriotic fervor to secure signatures for the yet-to-be-formed mounted infantry. It comprised 69 names, many the pillars of the community and almost as many of whom did not make it to the recruiting station a few weeks later.

In all, 40 men were selected, over one-half of whom were from Cranbrook. There were already others from town on their way to South Africa and there would be more to follow, but this group made up the local Strathcona Horse, Company “C” volunteers.

Required to report to Fort Steele at 12 noon on Feb. 8, just a day or two following their enlistment, what had been little more than talk suddenly became an undeniable rush of reality.

The residents of Cranbrook, eager to support the men, were forced to cancel plans for a public banquet and instead hold an improvised smoker at Forrest Hall. Once again the building was packed and the evening filled with patriotic speeches and songs from a community who, according to the Herald newspaper, “regrets their departure but glories in the patriotic courage” of the men who left homes, families and friends, who left jobs as ranchers, miners, railway workers, and clerks to travel halfway around the world to fight an unknown foe in an unknown land.

Saturday, Feb. 10, 1900, was a memorable day for the citizens of Cranbrook and for the men of the Strathcona Horse. Forty strong, under the command of local recruiting officer Captain Edmund Parker, they arrived in town at 11 p.m. accompanied by a band and a large group of citizens from Fort Steele. The contingent marched to the CPR station to board the train for Ottawa and then on to the fields of South Africa.

The volunteers stood in line on the platform while photographer Prest took three views. The boys were then given one hour to attend to last minute business and say their farewells. The photographs appear to be unaccounted for, but a newspaper description, in the purple prose of the moment, captures the event: “There were cheers for those departing and, as the train slowly pulled out, the vast concourse of people gathered at the station raised their voices in one prolonged cheer for the brave boys who had said goodbye to home and friends and turned their faces eastward as soldiers of the Queen. Amid the cheers there were many sobs and down the wrinkled cheeks of veterans as well as the smoother ones of the young, tear chased tear. In many instances a fervent hand clasp was the extent of the expression on either side. It was a sad occasion and yet the patriotism and loyalty of the people predominated. The tender feelings were sacrificed on the altar of duty and not one of the brave boys regretted enlisting at the trying moment when goodbye was said. It was about two o’clock when the order was given to board the cars and join the fifty-six-strong West Kootenay contingent. The long station platform and grounds were covered with a great mass of humanity. The engine gave a long, shrill warning whistle and the command, ‘all aboard’ passed down the line ... The band played, the crowd yelled and as long as the train could be seen, just so long were the boys hanging out of the windows waving farewell to dear old Cranbrook and their friends.”


The Original Recuit Papers it says, "Crops. Strathcona's Horse."

http://www.dailytownsman.com/ourtown/24 ... obile=true


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Re: Canada’s, Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African War

Postby Spañiard » 18 Jul 2014 17:35

Canadian Forces In South Africa, 1901 Sessional Paper N0. 35a.
Report G. p.159.



REPORT G.
Ottawa, March 23, 1901.
From Lt.-Col. S. B. Steele, M.V.O., Comdg. Lord Strathcona's Horse, to the Hon. the
Minister of Militia and Dejence, Ottawa.


Sir,—In accordance with instructions received through Lord Strathcona, I have the honour to submit this my report as Officer Commanding Lord Strathcona's Horse, organized in Canada for special service in South Africa. Our late lamented Queen having been graciously pleased to accept the ojBFer which Lord Strathcona in his patriotism made to raise and equip a regiment of horse for service in South Africa, I was off"ered the command and after considering the grave responsibility, accepted.At that time I was at Halifax en route for South Africa as Second-in-Command of the Canadian Mounted Rifles, but upon receiving your telegram proceeded to Ottawa and reported to you at once. When I arrived at Ottawa I found that the regiment to be raised was to be of full strength of three Squadrons, with machine gun detachments and regimental transport complete. Also that the men were to be i-ecruited in Manitoba, the North-west Territories, and British Columbia, and that the officers were to be experienced in life on the plains and in the mountains. After several consultations with you and Mr. Fred White, Comptroller of Northwest Mounted Police, in the course of which the officers were selected, and all preliminary arrangements made, I left for the west on January 31, arriving at Winnipeg on February 2. Here I gave the necessary instructions as to the number and class of men to be selected, and went on to Regina the same afternoon.

When in Ottawa I was empowered to obtain the assistance of such ofiicers of the North-west Mounted Police as I thought would be of help in recruiting, so that when I arrived at Regina on the 3rd I was able to request Superintendent Greisbach, Inspectors
Wilson, Howard, Harper and Morris to commence the work, and it was largely owing to their assistance, together with that of the officers already chosen for the corps, that the recruiting was ao rapidly and systematically carried out.



The corps entrained again at 10 p.m. and reached Halifax on the morning of March 15. At nearly every station all along the line we were met, day and night, by large crowds of people. At Campbellton, N.B., the citizens presented us with a silk banner, and at Moncton we received another flag, accompanied by the following address: —

" To Colonel Steele, Officers and Men of Strathcona's Horse :—
" The citizens of the city of Moncton, province of New Brunswick, desirous of showing in some tangible and practical way, their enthusiastic admiration of Lord Strathcona's magnificent patriotism, and of the splendid body of mounted troops who are known to us and will be known to posterity as Strathcona's Horse, beg your acceptance of this Canadian ensign, which bears upon its folds the emblems so dear to every British and Canadian heart. It is the symbol of England's greatness and it tells the story of
x,he Empire's unity.

" To you this bit of silk will be a sacred symbol —an inspiration to do what is right an incentive to duty, in its highest and noblest sense a reminder that Canadian prayers are with you on the path of duty." And when on African veldt or kopje you serve beneath that flag it will remind you of your loyalty and devotion to God, to Queen and Empire, ever to be guarded with
jealous care in moments of peril—^never to be yielded save with life.

" In oifering you this flag to-day we assure you that from every heart amongst us there will rise the earnest prayer : ' God bless and guide and guard Strathcona's Horse.'

"MONCTON, March 20, 1900."



I did a quick read on Lt.-Col. Steeles’ account, in the sessional paper, no mention of the name change from British staff re-named the regiment "Strathcona's Mounted Infantry"......

In the Steele papers there are letters where he demanded that they be known as “Strathcona's Horse.”


I remember seeing the letters, however I can’t remember if it's in the sessional paper?

In the end, Lt.-Col. Steele' himself, addresses the Regiment in 1901 letter to the Minister of Militia and Defence, Ottawa,
"Lord Strathcona's Horse."

Therefore I got it right in the Header, now that I think about it!



I'll read more of Steele's account later, work is calling.



.
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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby GrantRCanada » 18 Jul 2014 18:31

Spañiard wrote:Which posts are misleading in reference to Lord Strathcona Horse’??

I posted the Gov sessional paper, which provides the facts instead of Historian recycled accounts.

My only point was the use of the name "Lord Strathcona's Horse". In my view, the Sessional Paper's and Steele's use of that term was a misnomer - i.e. not reflecting the official name of the unit, but simply paying deference to the sponsor's rank as a titled British noble, as people (especially government bureaucrats) were particularly prone to do back in those days .....

Do I gather correctly from the wording of your posts and your Forum Name that English is perhaps not your first language? Just wondering, as it may be of relevance in connection with my use of the word "deference" above (in correct context) .... to hopefully avoid confusion, since I see that you consistently use that word in lieu of "difference" .... :wink:
Last edited by GrantRCanada on 19 Jul 2014 19:27, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby GrantRCanada » 18 Jul 2014 18:32

Deleted: double post
Last edited by GrantRCanada on 19 Jul 2014 19:26, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Canada’s, Lord Strathcona’s Horse’, Second South African

Postby Spañiard » 19 Jul 2014 16:16

GrantRCanada wrote:
GrantRCanada wrote:
Spañiard wrote:Which posts are misleading in reference to Lord Strathcona Horse’??

I posted the Gov sessional paper, which provides the facts instead of Historian recycled accounts.

My only point was the use of the name "Lord Strathcona's Horse". In my view, the Sessional Paper's and Steele's use of that term was a misnomer - i.e. not reflecting the official name of the unit, but simply paying deference to the sponsor's rank as a titled British noble, as people (especially government bureaucrats) were particularly prone to do back in those days .....

Do I gather correctly from the wording of your posts and your Forum Name that English is perhaps not your first language? Just wondering, as it may be of relevance in connection with my use of the word "deference" above (in correct context) .... to hopefully avoid confusion, since I see that you consistently use that word in lieu of "difference" .... :wink:



Hi thank U for elaborating on LSH, yes your comment holds water in that perspective, and that’s why I changed the header, as worded in the recruitment paper and first accounts, Strathcona's Horse. I contemplated using Lord, owing too many historians, LAC, DHH, etc., etc., for SA, use “Lord Strathcona's Horse,” as U stated in Steele’s account, and in the 1901 sessional paper. I extracted the actual accounts word for word, from the sessional paper without adding nada, aka nothing. I thought at first u discredited the actual sessional paper account, in a few cases U can.

S.V.P. I’m also aware by your post, U have issue even using, Strathcona's Horse.

English is not even a second Language, however I try, furthermore I’m in Montreal. However, have a proper footing in British, Canadian, and US English, with all its “differences,” and still learning. If I mixed the words up, is owing I have dyslexia, when I post or write need too read, edit manytimes to get it right, not count I have 3 languages, grammar, running through my head, at times get all mixed up. I’ll make those changes immediately on both sites.

THK U FR YR time and pointing that out, I have no issue being corrected, that’s how one learns and avoids confussion.

As U can read, I replied with “reference,” to your last post.

They say a humble submission, or humility makes an individual stronger and wiser.


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