Royal Canadian Regiment Back Frm Anglo Boer War 1st Nov 1900

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Royal Canadian Regiment Back Frm Anglo Boer War 1st Nov 1900

Postby Spañiard » 23 Jun 2017 02:06

SVP, the below are extracts...for the full account kindly fallow short link...
2nd SS Bn. Royal Canadian Regiment Return’s From South African War, 1st November, 1900. http://wp.me/p55eja-PP


Col. W.D. Otter’s Militia Department Official Report, Toronto, 26th, Jan. 1901: — On the 7th September, I received a telegram from Field Marshal Commander-in-Chief, asking if the Regiment would prolong its service in South Africa, but as I am treating of this subject under another heading, I shall not here enter into any of the details.

On the 24th of September, the officers and men who had decided to return to Canada on completion of their engagement, left their several stations for Pretoria, and there entrained on the 26th for Cape Town. Previous to their departure, Lord Roberts inspected them, and expressed his great satisfaction with the services they had rendered during the past ten months. These details, numbering 16 officers and 413 N.C.O’s and men, sailed from Cape Town for Halifax under Major Pelletier on the SS. Idaho on the 1st October, 1900. There now remained only 12 officers and 250 men of the regiment in South Africa doing regimental duty, composing ‘A and B’ Companies, N.C.O’s and men of the permanent corps and of the draft, together with some few men of various companies who had elected to remain……..

The transport sailed at 5 p.m. the same day, previous to which, however, the Mayor of Cape Town, Col. Hanbury Williams, representing the High Commissioner, and three members of the Cape Colony Government, came on board to wish us bon voyage, and express appreciation of the services rendered by the Royal Canadian Regiment during the past twelve months. Besides the Royal Canadians, the following troops were returning to England by the Harvarden Castle:—…. Before leaving Cape Town, I had been detailed to the command or the troops on board, and made the following appointments for the voyage. The voyage to England was without any notable incident, but a most pleasant one, our association with the other troops on board being marked by the greatest possible cordiality and good feeling..................................

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The Sherbrooke Examiner Fri. Nov. 2, 1900. — Steamer Idaho at Halifax. — Cannons gave a Welcome. — Large Crowed take part in Celebration. — Halifax. November 1. — At twenty minutes to three o’clock this morning the transport Idaho was sighted just outside the harbour. Instantly the citadel cannon sent forth a mighty roar of welcome, and Halifax’ great celebration of the home-coming of the Canadian soldiers was begun. The steamer anchored at quarantine for the night. The troops disembarked at an early hour this morning. Thousands of visitors and the whole population of Halifax waited patiently up till a late hour last night for the signalling of the transport Idaho. The city is gorgeous with bunting which the rain Tuesday night only slightly damaged, and it has had to stand a severe test to-day from the gale. The demonstration which took place was a memorable one.

Leave By Special Train. — The upper Canadian men left by special train last night. They all referred to the voyage from Cape Town as a very pleasant one. The men who will number about 150, including the Montreal men, are expected to arrive in Montreal tomorrow forenoon.........................

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NEW BRUNSWICK: — SOUTH AFRICAN CONTINGENT FUND. — Report and Accounts 1899-1901. Published 1901. — Ever since July wounded and invalided men had been coming home in small batches, but it was not until November that any of the Contingents returned in a body. Six Companies of the 1st Contingent, including “G” Company, returned to Canada direct from South Africa on the transport “Idaho,” landing in Halifax on November 1st. The New Brunswick men arrived here the following day. That was a day which had long been waited for by the loyal citizens of Saint John.

When it arrived the opportunity was not lost of giving the returned soldiers a Royal welcome, and of making it an occasion of unbounded enthusiasm. Mayor Daniel requested that the day be made a public holiday, and with few exceptions the request was complied with. The men arrived on a special train a little before noon, and were met at the station by the Mayor, Aldermen and thousands of citizens who had been waiting there for hours. When the cheering at their arrival had subsided, the men were drawn up on the platform and presented with an address by the Mayor..................................

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St. John Daily Sun, St. John N.B., Nov. 3, 1900. — Home Sweet Home! St. John’s Reception. — “A hundred thousand welcomes; I could weep, and I could laugh.” The words of Coriolanus very fifty express the feelings of the people of St. John yesterday, when they got the first glimpse of the returning heroes from South Africa. That some had arrived home earlier dates and had been royally received made no difference whatever in the enthusiasm of yesterday. A larger detachment of the men was coming, and a public holiday had been declared, so that the city as a whole might give expression to the feelings of joy aroused by the safe return of all who have thus far arrived; and give expression also to the patriotic ardour of the people, and their pride in the ‘achievements’ of these young men. Little more than a year ago the latter were quiet, industrious, unobtrusive citizens, going about their work as others did, and thinking little of either the glory or hardship of war. Yesterday they came back clear-eyed, strong-limbed, and stouthearted, the heroes of a great campaign in a far off land, and invested with a new dignity and a new responsibility.....................................

SVP...For further reading fallow link, P.6: — https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid= ... page&hl=en

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The Evening Citizen, Ottawa Saturday Nov. 3rd, 1900. — The Boys Will be Here On Time. — The soldiers will arrive at 2.30 o’clock this afternoon. They decided not to stop at Montreal, so that they could be here at the hour stated. Mr. Fred Cook, secretary of the authority of Sheriff Sweetland, ordered dinner to be put on the train at Alexandra, so that there will be no delay. The train will pull up at Wellington streets station. As published yesterday the soldiers will march via Eigin, McLeod, Metcalfe and Wellington streets to parliament hill. The proceedings on the hill will be brief, so as to allow the men to rejoin their families without delay. The big demonstration will take place on Monday night at Lansdowne Park it will be free to everybody……

No Stop In Montreal. — Montreal, Nov. 2- (Special) — Montreal will receive with open arms today the sturdy sons of Canada returning from the battlefield of South Africa, but according to an arrangement made last night, with a view of not dissapointing Ottawa people in regard to the arrival of their company in the capital, the Ottawa boys will not participate in the demonstration here. The contingent has been divided and the Ottawa company, instead of coming to Montreal, will change at St. Henri, so as to reach home at the time scheduled. The Montreal and Toronto troops will not arrive here until 1.30. The city is in gala attire in honour of the returning heroes. Elaborate displays of hunting, electrical effects and various designs expressing welcome adorn the principal thoroughfares. The entire militia of the city will parade shortly after noon to receive their commanders, who will be tendered complimentary luncheon and formally welcomed by the city and military officials. Unless some unforeseen change occurs the Ottawa boys will reach home at 2.30…..

PBA...For further reading fallow link to newspaper column, Google P.16: — https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid= ... e&hl=enThe Evening

Citizen, Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 5th, 1900. — It Was A Right Royal Welcome They Received. Forty thousand people of the Capital turned out and acclaimed Ottawa’s portion of the brave body that won world-wide honor and fame in defense of the flag and Empire. It was one long cheer from the time the boys in khaki left the Elgin street station till the Parliament Hill terrace was reached, and the wildest enthusiasm prevailed. A monster assemblage heard the addresses to the soldiers and the message of Her Majesty the Queen.
Patriotism was the predominant characteristic of the populace, and the entire city was gorgeous in color. Millions of flags floated in the breeze, thousands of yards of red, white and blue bunting were artistically arranged on residences and business blocks, hundreds of appropriate devices and mottoes appeared in store windows and across the streets, and at night there were illuminations on a scale of magnitude and brilliancy never before seen in the city.
Arrived On Time. — One particularly gratifying feature of the welcome was the commencement, sharp on the time announced by the committee. People through the force of experience expected to wait an hour or two for the proceedings to start, but on Saturday the joy bells started their merry peal shortly after the crowd had gathered and everyone knew, the train with its precious burden had arrived on time..................................
The Arrival. — When at 2.45 the whistle announced the approach of the longed for train the crowd rushed forward, many running to meet it. The train pulled slowly to the crossing. When it came to a standstill, the heavens were rent with a chorus of screeches, sounded from the nearby engines. Cheers and counter cheers were given and several of the more enthusiastic ones in the crowd rushed forward to scale the steps and sides of the ears. As the well-remembered faces appeared at the windows, friends vied with friends in extending individual greetings............................

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Royal Canadian Regiment Return of First Contingent from South Africa, 1900 Ottawa, Ont.

The Gazette, Montreal, Monday, Nov. 5, 1900. — WELCOMED. — First South African Contingent. — A Great Crowd. — Thousands Lined the Route and Cheered Wildly. — At The Drill Shed. — Returning Soldiers Entertained at Luncheon. — An Address of Welcome. — Speeches Made by Lord Strathcona, Dr. Peterson and Others. — Toronto Men Given a Hearty Farewell Last Night. — Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! Cheer on cheer went up from myriads of lusty throats on Saturday afternoon, when the gaily-bedecked engine, bearing the first contingent, pulled into Bonaventure Station. It was the signal for an ovation. The excitement was taken up by the thousand persons massed in the adjoining streets, who were all eager to catch a glimpse of a khaki uniform. Patiently had they waited for weeks for the wished for moment was at hand. The immense throng, which seemed to extend for an interminable distance up Windsor street, opened their throats wide, and gave vent to a thundering welcome. Hats flew in the air, canes waved, and handkerchiefs fluttered, in a sea of confusion. At the sound, as if aroused from a reverie over what might have been, a hundred bronzed faces, were thrust forward, which caused the crowed to cheer again.................................

A Year Ago. — Such a welcome was most fitting. One year ago on a chilly November night a company of young men, dressed in all sorts of clothing, but inspired by the spirit of liberty, marched through Montreal’s streets to join the main regiment at Quebec. Their send off was modest, and unassuming. Their fathers and mothers and friends thought it more desirable to reserve all enthusiasm for the home-coming. They had confidence in those young men. They believed that, though untrained, they would yet prove their worth in battle. The deeds of the past year have confirmed that opinion, as by them praise has been won from the most enviable quarters in the British Empire. They flinched not from the manual labour of the camp, nor did they falter in the presence of the Boer rifles...........................

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Return of Canadian First Contingent, Royal Canadian Regiment, Ottawa, Ont., 1900.

Not All Laughter. — In the midst of such an outburst of frantic cheering and shouting, there was occasional evidence of grief. The mass of people cheered and laughter; and jostled one another in their attempt to attract the police of a soldier boy they new. All, however, were not so happy. The saddened face and deep mourning of an elderly lady, or of a sister, perhaps, told the story of loved ones who had returned. Their eyes brightened occasionally out of sympathy fore those homes whose joy knew no bounds, but it was easy to see their thoughts ere far away, searching the dreary waste for the spot where those they cherished had fallen in battle, yet fronting the foe, with hearts swelling to the last in patriotic emotion for the safety of the Empire.

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Last edited by Spañiard on 24 Jun 2017 02:18, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Royal Canadian Regiment Back Frm Anglo Boer War 1st Nov

Postby Spañiard » 23 Jun 2017 02:08

Part II as Fallows........

At The Station. — Warmth of Reception Began on Train’s Arrival. — The arrival of the train at Bonaveture station was the signal of a great popular demonstration. Loud cheering from the guards of honour and the fortunate persons permitted to enter therein greeting the heroes. Almost the first to disembark was Capt. Fraser, of Sherbrooke, the plucky little officer in command of Montreal’s company, and Lieut. Laurie, of this city. They were received by Lieut.-Col. Roy, D.O.C., and staff, and by Acting Mayor Gagnon, and a large delegation of civic fathers. Thanks to the discipline of Chief of Police Hughes, who had detailed one hundred men under Inspector Lancey, for the purpose, the long narrow station platform were kept fairly clear of people. All the room was needed by the guard of honour and the invited civilians, who at times surged around like school boys.....................................

The Procession. — Thousands Massed on Windsor Street Let Loose Their Enthusiasm. — It was a great relief to have the procession go on as it gave the people a chance to see the boys and their rifles, dogs, and other souvenirs. There was a great roar when the line started, headed by the Duke of York Hussars, and invited officers from St. Johns, then came the 65th Regiment, the Prince of Wales Fusilliers, The Royal Scots, then the “first contingent,” the Vics, a detachment of the 43rd Battalion, of Ottawa, and the Governor- General’s Foot Guards, the Imperial Army and Navy Veterans, the Fenian Raid Veterans, the Independent Citizens, fife and drum committee, bearing a train of several organizations are deserving of great praise, yet, in addition to this, the Independent Citizens’ Fife and drum Committee, dressed in khaki coats and hats, and their bands in the same uniforms, under the command of Mr. Geo. Hunt, looked very attractive. By some they were mistaken for the boys from the Cape. What a throng of people were wedged in around the railway station and up Windsor street...................

The High School. — The Boys and Girls Cheered as the Men Went by. — From the boys and girls schools a great reception was given to the soldiers. Three stands had been erected, on for the Senior School, one from the Boy’s High School on the right of the entrance, and one for the girl’s on the left. The building itself was decorated with flags and streamers of blue and white, the High School colors, stretched from the top to the bottom. Across the road were hung banners with the inscription, “The High Schools Welcome You” and “Montreal Senior School Welcome to Our Brave Boys.”........

On St. Denis Street. — Crowd Just as Dense Along This Portion of the Route. — Laval University honoured the returning soldiers, by hoisting the Canadian and French Flags, from the two posts at the entrance, and hanging flags from the windows. Very few of the students are at present in town, as they have a holiday for the elections; but those who were. Lined the gallery in front, and cheered loudly, while the steps leading out to the main entrance was thronged by spectators who echoed the students’ applause. A great crowd was gathered at the corner of St. Denis and St. Catherine streets, and through these Lt.-Col. Labelle, with the 65th, forced his way, to regain the proper position in the column. He had been compelled by the McGill students to yield the place behind the Royal Scots to them, and he had turned off down St. Catherine to receive his rightful station, on St. Denis.

At The Drill Shed. — Contingent Given a Warm Welcome When It Entered the Building. — Through the partly-opened portals they trooped, men of the Field Battery and Garrison Artillery leading the way, with, close on their heels, the Prince of Wales Fusiliers, headed by their fife-and-drum band, which filled the air with “the Maple Leaf Forever.” The brass band of the same regiment came in the footsteps of the members of its battalion, and heralded the approach of the men in khaki with the nerve-enervating “Auld Lang Syne.” Immediately in rear of the band fallowed the returned, Transavaal warriors, some borne shoulder high by friends and comrades, while on the arms of others hung wives, sister and other lassies. These were the men whom Montreal was proud to honour, these were the sons of Canada who had gone forth “to uphold their country’s honor in the strength of manhood’s might”, and no sooner did they set foot across the threshold of the Drill Shed than the many privileged hundreds who had been admitted in the gallery by invitation, and most of whom either wore a khaki badge, bearing the words of welcome, or sported a British emblem,............................

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South African War; Totonto parade of returned Canadian troops on Yonge St., looking n. from Edward St. 9.00 a.m. ish. 5th Nov. 1900.

The Hall Decorations. — The doors were then barred, and to the public outside the scene was closed; but for the spectators in the gallery it was only just beginning; and it was the last scene in a memorable day. The last act of proud citizens towards the brave fellows who had so worthily taken their part in the battles of the Empire waged in the far-off land of the Boer. As the troops field into the building the several corps turned to the right and to the left, taking their places along the sides of a roped enclosure, in which had been erected three tables, running north and south, at which the heroes of the day were to dine, and at the southern end of these a cross-table had been placed. It was a long jog for the khaki-clad lads to free themselves sufficiently from the embraces of relatives, friends and acquaintances to deposit their arms and accoutrements in the armoury of the Prince of Wales Fusilliers; but at last it was done, and they were marched into a roped-in space, and at the sound of the bugle, they took their places at the tables to enjoy the hospitality of Montreal’s citizens. It was a picture replete with variety of colour. As the outer framework, were the walls of the building itself. The interior of the Drill Hall, by reason of its cold and rigid outlines, does not readily lend itself to the hands of the decorator. The vast space, unrelieved by any ornamentation, makes the work of beautifying the place a task of no small difficulty. But this had been satisfactorily overcome on the present occasion, and an atmosphere of warmth and brightness had, by a colour scheme in red and blue, with gold lettering, been imparted the bareness and dreariness that is the characteristic of Montreal’s’ military headquarters. It showed what well arranged bunting in capable of................................

The Welcome. — In the centre of the hall had been constructed a band stand, from which speeches were delivered, and between it and the cross-table was a roped-in space for a few favoured ladies and gentlemen. Among the latter, who were either seated here or occupied positions on the band stand, were: Ald. Gagnon, acting mayor, wearing the chain of office: Lieut.-Col. Roy, D.O.C.: Lord Stratchona and Mount Royal, Mr. Justice Davidson, Mr. Justice Wurtele, Ven. Archdeacon Norton. Hon. J.D. Rolland, Hon. A.W. Atwater, Lieut.-Col. Busteed, Lieut.–Col. Stevenson, Mayor Seath, Mr. Roberts Bickerdike, M.L.A.: ex-Mayor R. Wilson Smith, Alds. Sadler, McBride, Larmarche, Ribillard, Ekers, Faucher, Gallery, Laporte, Ruby, Clearihue, Tansey, Principal Peterson, Mr. E.S. Clouston, and Mr. A.T.Taylor. Soon after the returned soldiers were seated, the speechmaking programme was commenced, Lieut.-Col. Roy first reading a cablegram that had been received by the Governor-General, from the Queen. It was signed, “Victoria,” and reading as fallows: “Her Majesty, the Queen learns with pleasure of the safe return of her Canadian soldiers, and desires to again express her appreciation of their service to the Empire.”...................................

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Toronto parade of returned Canadian troops; Bay St., looking n. from s. of Temperance St. Nov. 5th, 1900.

The Civic Address. — It Was Read in Absence of Mayor by Acting-Mayor Gagnon. — Acting Mayor Gagnon then read the civic address of welcome, it said: “This is a proud day for Montreal and Canada. The commercial metropolis, the centre of the commercial energy of this fair young country of ours, has the honor to welcome home from the scenes of their glorious accomplishment, not only her own sons who, a year ago, left this good city to fight the battles of our Queen and Empire, but also many of the brave men and true of our great sister province of Ontario. It is a peculiarly happy circumstance which permits the people of Montreal to extend upon this occasion a proud and loving welcome to so many of the gallant and loyal sons of our sister province. For you, soldiers from Ontario, are just as much our soldiers, our pride, as our sons who stand shoulder to shoulder with you in the ranks today, as they stood shoulder to shoulder with you at Paardeberg and Cronje’s laager..............................................................................

Lord Strathcona. — His Lordship Was the First Speaker to Address the Men. — Lord Strathcona referred, amid applause, to the fact he had the privilege of being one of Her Gracious Majesty’s soldiers in the country, a fact of which he was proud. He then went on speak ot the returned soldiers, and said it was not necessary to allude to their deeds in order to attempt to say to our fellow-citizens in Canada what we thought of them; their actions spoke far more eloquently than words. There were no words that would add to the honour they had done themselves, and the honor they had done to the Dominion, and to the whole Empire. (Applause.) At the call of duty, and without being asked, they had offered themselves as soldiers to defend the interests not only of the Mother Country, but equally of this Dominion, of which they and he were so proud. (Renewed applause.) He could assure them, coming quite recently from Great Britain, that all they had done was appreciated in that country by all classes to the utmost, as well as all that was being done by their comrades, who had remained behind. They had that day heard a message of congratulation from the Queen; it was only what they could have expected from their gracious sovereign. His Lordship concluded by extending to them a most cordial welcome home, and wishing them God speed in every way. (loud cheers.)..............................

Toronto Men Leave. — Given a Warm Send-Off by Montreal Militiamen Last Night. The air vibrated with martial music last night, and stirring tunes quickened the pulse and made thousands walk in procession to the Grant Trunk and Windsor Depots, to receive a parting cheer and a hearty hand-shake to the gallant Toronto lads, who were bound west. The Price of Wales Fusiliers with the fife and drum band and the brass band, made a strong muster, and on the arrival of Major Finlayson at the Drill Hall he made such arrangements so that not only his own regiment could look after the veterans, but that the many other members of sister regiments who had put in an appearance, could march in the parade. The march from the Drill Hall commenced with about 1,000 soldiers and civilians, but, before the depots were reached fully eight thousand were in line marching to the stirring strains of “Soldiers of the Queen” and the “Maple Leaf Forever.”..........................


THK U FR YR TME.

C.U.

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History is not like playing horseshoes where close enough counts; those that have done the proper leg work have a responsibility to insure a detailed accurate account. Canada at War Blog
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