Bishop’s College Drill Association Not Authorised Dec 6 1861

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Bishop’s College Drill Association Not Authorised Dec 6 1861

Postby Spañiard » 20 Sep 2015 16:09

Bishop’s College “Drill Association,” Lennoxville, Was Not Authorised Dec. 6th, 1861.

The status quo, mainstream historian, Cadet Corps Roots account as fallows:—
Bishop’s College Drill Association was formed in Lennoxville, Que. on December 6, 1861. Another 14 of the early "Drill Associations" or "Rifle Companies" stood up in Ontario and Quebec. Canada's oldest continually serving cadet corps is No. 2 Bishop's College School Cadet Corps in Lennoxville, Quebec, its roots firmly in the previous drill associations.
http://www.armycadethistory.com/Main_page.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Canadian_Army_Cadets

The above mainstream historian, on-line recycled account, is vague, questionable and debatable. Bishop’s College designated a Drill Association formed in Decr., 6th 1861, only unfolded in 1869; its seeds were firmly rooted in the Independent Rifle Companies, raised during the Trent Affair. As for “another 14 early Drill Associations or Rifle Companies stoop up, in Ontario and Quebec,” is misleading, erroneous. For Lower & Upper Canada by February 1862 over 60 Independent, Regular, Volunteer, “Rifle Companies,” “Class A & B” were authorised. The amendment Section 11 consisted of; “professors, masters, pupils of Universities, Schools or other public Institutions raised the above mentioned companies,” I only found two non-school’s DA.’s organised. Drill Associations were only assented by the militia act amendment, 9th June, 1862, with minimal interest from educational institutions, the majority preferred Rifle, Infantry, etc., Coy’s or were already authorized as active, independent, volunteer &c., pre amendment. This prompted a new regulation, obligating the Militia District Divisions and Sub-Divisions, of the “Sedentary Battalions, Companies,” too raise Drill Associations. By Dec., 1862 to 7th Feb., 1863, a total of 76 Drill Associations were authorised by GO., though 70 were allotted by Section 11…………………………

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Oddly, BCS historical accounts on their cadet corps roots, doesn’t support the Historical Click’s above status quo narrative. In “The Magazine Of Bishop’s College School Lennoxville, Que.,” 1961, page 11. “1861—Dec. 6 No. 2 Bishop's College School Cadet Corps, R.C.A.C. was authorized by Militia General Orders of December 6, 1861 as the Volunteer Rifle Company of Bishop's College, abbreviated in Militia forms to Bishop's College Coy…………….


In the Minutes of Corporation Meeting, Bishop's College. Nov. 20, 1861: "Memorial from some of the pupils of the Junior Department respecting the formation of a Rifle Corps" . . . "It was resolved that, provided it be under such restrictions as shall satisfy the Rector and not interfere with other important duties, the Corporation approves the formation of such a Corps." Return: February, 13th 1862, styled as “Bishop’s College Corps, Lennoxville.”


ANNO VICESIMO-QUINTO
VICTORIAE REGINAE.

AN ACT AMEND THE ACT RESPECTING THE MILITIA.

Militia Act Amendment: Chapter 1, 26 Victoria, 1862.
[Assented to 9th June, 1862.]

DRILL ASSOCIATIONS.
Section 11. (Certain Companies may be organized, &c, but not paid): The Commander in Chief may sanction the organization of associations for purposes of Drill and of independent Companies of Infantry composed of professors, masters, pupils of Universities, Schools or other public Institutions, or of persons engaged in or about the same, or of reserve men; but such Associations or Companies shall not be provided with any clothing or allowance therefore, nor shall they receive pay.

The Annual Militia Lists of Canada for 1862, 64, 68 till 1870 are missing, burnt in the pre 1916 fire, or as claimed, never published. Bishop’s College Rifle Coy, Lennoxville, was “Class B” militia independent rifle coy, post 1867 classified a “Volunteer Company,” eluded the change until 1869. Several were left, and by 1870s all schools complied with now, Section 58 respecting the Militia Act, noted many rifle, infantry non-school Coy’s, reorganised with newly raised Active Militia Battalion’s. The General Order gazetted by the C.-in-C., redesignated as “The Bishop’s College Drill Association of Lennoxville.” For BCRC., the designation, “Independent,” in the latter “Volunteer,” wasn’t officially styled into the name, considering Bishop’s was classified “Independent Company” in 1867………...


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By the documents provided one can deduct, plausible first styled as fallows:—
• “Bishop’s College Corps, Lennoxville,” from 1861-62.
• “2nd Rifle Coy Bishop’s College,” Lennoxville, Apr. 1863-64.
• “Bishop’s College Rifle Coy,” Lennoxville, ca1865- Feb. 26, 1869.
• “The Bishop’s College Drill Association of Lennoxville, Feb. 27 1869-?


The above are just snippets, SVP fallow short-link for prime source documents, photos, &c.

Bishop’s College “Drill Association,” Lennoxville, Was Not Authorised Dec. 6th, 1861.
http://wp.me/p55eja-AP

THK U FR YR TME.

Joseph.

.
History is not like playing horseshoes where close enough counts; those that have done the proper leg work have a responsibility to insure a detailed accurate account. Canada at War Blog
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Re: Bishop’s College Drill Association Not Authorised Dec 6

Postby servicepub » 22 Jan 2016 04:33

Thanks for this Joseph. I was the Cadet RSM of BCS #2 Cadet Corps in the early 1970s. In the school archives are some original documents including hand-written standing orders - part of which states the cadets will pay the Sgt-Maj the sum of $2 annually in payment for his drill instruction.
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Re: Bishop’s College Drill Association Not Authorised Dec 6

Postby Spañiard » 19 Feb 2016 03:17

servicepub wrote:Thanks for this Joseph. I was the Cadet RSM of BCS #2 Cadet Corps in the early 1970s. In the school archives are some original documents including hand-written standing orders - part of which states the cadets will pay the Sgt-Maj the sum of $2 annually in payment for his drill instruction.



My pleasure, I contacted BCS head master and archives prior to publishing, requesting permission on pictures etc. Owing this is a BW matter going against the grain of established history, I contacted the professor, D. O’keefe, gave the argument, a big thumbs up.

Throughout the dominion pre and post MA 1855, cadets, sedentary, active, paid for their own uniforms, etc., these corps mostly supported by public fundraisers, donations, and in Montreal by “The Clique,” per-say The Montreal Highland Cadets, was authorised, raised, funded by 5th Batt. Royal Scots of Canada and public support, the first cadet corps’ ever unofficially connected to a Canadian regiment.

THK U FR YR TME.

Joseph
History is not like playing horseshoes where close enough counts; those that have done the proper leg work have a responsibility to insure a detailed accurate account. Canada at War Blog
http://wp.me/55eja
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