Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 1857

For all discussions relating to the Indian Mutiny of 1857-59.

Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Ian Dashwood » 27 Apr 2013 15:47

Les

I have the books Harris,Captain R.P Anderson,Mrs Germon,LE Ruutz Rees, Katherine M Bartrum and The Defence of Lucknow by 'A staff officer' published by Smith Elder & Co. If there are any others I would love to Know.

Yours Ian
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 27 Apr 2013 23:12

Ian

I've sent you a link to Dr Fayrer's memoir, which has a number of Dashwood refs, by PM.

Apart from the published memoirs/diaries you mention I have a number of others. Are you interested only in Dashwood refs or Siege memoirs/diaries in general? I can let you have a list.

Best

Les W.
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Ian Dashwood » 29 Apr 2013 17:22

Les

Darrah Is Henry Zouch Darrah of the 41st N.I. He later reached Colonel in his Account he mentions his wife 'Bess' and two Babes. He was stationed at Seetapore and left for Lucknow when the mutiny broke out. He then joined the 32 and was stationed at the Muchee Bhawun before retreating to the Residancy.
There is a picture of Miss E.A Darrah probably a daughter.

Routleff is Capt. WJ Routleff 4th co :1st Bn B.A.


Ian
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby ajohnston » 03 May 2013 11:42

To Les Waring:

Dear Mr. Waring,

I am not familiar with how your website works, but I am researching my husband's great-grandfather Fowell Buxton Johnston, who ranched on the Arazaty Estancia in the Province of San Jose, Monte Video, Uruguay, from 1866 to 1875. I was intrigued that his name cropped up in the your website, where he is mentioned as 'partner' of Major Sam Lawrence, VC, who distinguished himself at the siege of Lucknow. Fowell Buxton Johnston (something of a black sheep in his family) joined the Army in 1858 and went out to India in 1862. It sounds as though Lawrence was there then too and they both retired from the Army in 1865, possibly to go into business together in Uruguay. Family letters record Fowell Buxton as having bought a sheep ranch in Uruguay. There is very little information in family letters/journals about his activities there, apart from a lot of head-shaking and general disapproval. His son was the great calligrapher Edward Johnston (my husband's grandfather) and we are in contact with some calligraphers in Uruguay, who have actually found the Arazaty Estancia itself, looking very derelict and bleak. This was in fact where Major Lawrence died in 1868. He was supposed to have been buried in the British Cemetery in Monte Video, but this has not been confirmed.

Can you tell me whether they were in fact in partnership and if you have any other information about this side of Major Lawrence's life? Our friends in Uruguay may now be able to trace the purchase of Arazaty, which may have been in Lawrence's name. I was unclear from your website whether you are in fact in Uruguay. It sounds as if you were unable to get hold of the photo of Lawrence with Fowell Buxton Johnston, but if you do have it I would certainly be able to identify Johnston.

Looking forward to hearing from you,
Angela Johnston
ajohnston8f@gmail.com
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 03 May 2013 13:06

Ian

Thanks for the extra info on the Darrahs. It's nice to have a 'Zouch' on board, never had one before, I'd guess that it was the family name of some relative, a very common practice at the time. The daughter was Eveleen A. and, I suspect though without proof, the other a son, also Henry Z. I believe that both 'Bess Darrah' and the two children were at the 50th Anniversary Celebration in 1907, can you confirm that?

Also a public confirmation of my gratitude for the material you sent me by PM. It has great 'academic' and even greater emotional value for me.

Will be in further contact.

Les W.
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 03 May 2013 13:57

ajohnston wrote:To Les Waring:

Dear Mr. Waring,

I am not familiar with how your website works, but I am researching my husband's great-grandfather Fowell Buxton Johnston, who ranched on the Arazaty Estancia in the Province of San Jose, Monte Video, Uruguay, from 1866 to 1875. I was intrigued that his name cropped up in the your website, where he is mentioned as 'partner' of Major Sam Lawrence, VC, who distinguished himself at the siege of Lucknow. Fowell Buxton Johnston (something of a black sheep in his family) joined the Army in 1858 and went out to India in 1862. It sounds as though Lawrence was there then too and they both retired from the Army in 1865, possibly to go into business together in Uruguay. Family letters record Fowell Buxton as having bought a sheep ranch in Uruguay. There is very little information in family letters/journals about his activities there, apart from a lot of head-shaking and general disapproval. His son was the great calligrapher Edward Johnston (my husband's grandfather) and we are in contact with some calligraphers in Uruguay, who have actually found the Arazaty Estancia itself, looking very derelict and bleak. This was in fact where Major Lawrence died in 1868. He was supposed to have been buried in the British Cemetery in Monte Video, but this has not been confirmed.

Can you tell me whether they were in fact in partnership and if you have any other information about this side of Major Lawrence's life? Our friends in Uruguay may now be able to trace the purchase of Arazaty, which may have been in Lawrence's name. I was unclear from your website whether you are in fact in Uruguay. It sounds as if you were unable to get hold of the photo of Lawrence with Fowell Buxton Johnston, but if you do have it I would certainly be able to identify Johnston.

Looking forward to hearing from you,
Angela Johnston
ajohnston8f@gmail.com


Dear Mrs. Johnston

I suppose you know the biblical adage ' Cast your bread upon the waters ....' I've just woken up on a wet Montevideo morning to find that it has indeed returned, with interest. First of all just a slight rectification, it isn't my website and wouldn't be so efficiently run or moderated as it is, if it were in my hands. Thanks to Mark and the rest of the crew for the superb job that they do.

I am indeed very interested in Fowell Buxton Johnston, through his connection with 'my main man' Sam Lawrence. I first came across the connection between the two in Mulhall's 'The English in South America', published in the 1860s, in which Lawrence is recorded as having settled in San José department (we don't have provinces here) with his friend 'Captain Johnston' , who continued there with 'a fine establishment' after Lawrence's death in, as you say, 1868 (June 17 to be exact.) I could not find anything about the mysterious Captain Johnston for a number of years until I came across a reference to his son Edward Johnston, the famous calligrapher, who was born at Arazatí a few years after Sam Lawrence's death. From there I was able to move on to Priscilla Johnston's biography of Edward. Going back over my data on Sam Lawrence I then found that they had been together with the 25th Regiment of Foot (later KOSB), when it was stationed in Gibraltar in the late 1850s. Sam joined the 25th in 1859 so Johnston was already with it. One question I have is, did they know each other beforehand?

They then moved on to two different cavalry regiments, Sam the 8th Hussars, which were about to be or already were stationed in India, there is a carte-de-visite photo of Sam taken by a Calcutta studio in the uniform of the 8th. Both seem to have contracted a mysterious 'disease' or diseases in India, which almost killed Johnston and, according to Mulhall, eventually led to Sam's death at Arazatí, confirmed by another source which mistakenly locates it in 'Monte Video'. Mulhall has them moving to Uruguay in 1864, though my researches haven't been able to confirm this yet.

Problems of health and work have not permitted me to continue my researches on the ground here, especially at Arazatí, which is rather out of the way if you don't have a car. I went there once, when in very bad condition but couldn't confirm whether the modern estancia, where I was warmly received, was the one where Johnston and Lawrence lived and the latter reportedly died. If you can, please put me in contact via PM with the Uruguayan calligraphers you mention, my original aim in this project was to find Sam Lawrence's final resting place, which I am almost certain was not at the original British Cemetery. I have found no record of his being buried there, transferred to the present site of the cemetery, or having been registered in the municipal records as dying here. My best guess is Arazatí or thereabouts. Tracing the history of a property in Uruguay is very difficult, according to my public notary friends who officiate in property transactions, but with some more evidence about the site of the estancia, I might be able to follow it up.

I currently have a 12K word 'biography' of Sam Lawrence, lacking principally details of his life in Uruguay and his final resting place. Hopefully, together, we might be able to fill in some of the details.

I'll be in touch by PM.

Very Best Wishes

Les W.
Last edited by Les Waring on 14 May 2013 01:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 08 May 2013 12:32

Mrs Johnston

I tried to contact you via your private e-mail address but got no reply, so I'm posting the message here. Viewing your post on the site the other day was a very emotional moment for me.I've been involved in researching Sam Lawrence, as he was always known, since 2002 and am particularly keen to find his final resting place which I strongly believe is not the British Cemetery here in Montevideo. If we continue this line of discussion it would be better to move it to Researching Individuals, as Fowell Buxton 'Buck' Johnston (FBJ) had no Lucknow connection.

FBJ's military career. According to Hart's Army Lists (HAL) - I have fuller notes if you are interested

First appears on 1858 list as having purchased a commision as an Ensign in the 25th Regiment of Foot (later King's Own Scottish Borders) on 21 May 1858. The 25th had already embarked for Gibraltar, where they would be the garrison regiment, on 13 January 1858. FBJ would, therefore have undergone basic training at the Batallion's depot at Pembroke, or possibly Athlone (Ireland) where it moved at an undetermined date. He would then have joined the First Batallion at Gibraltar.
Lawrence (SHL) joined the 25th from his original regiment, the 32nd Foot, in 1859 so probably met FBJ when he arrived in Gibraltar, though I wonder if they met earlier.

In 1862 (I may be slightly out as I don't have my detailed notes to hand) the 25th was posted to Malta for garrison duties and both men left the regiment. FBJ joined the 100th Foot (Royal Canadians), which took over garrison duties at Gibraltar. Three of SHL's former officer colleagues from Lucknow and the 32nd were already with the 100th.
There is a photo of FBJ in an album (NGC 34931) belonging to of the National Gallery of Canada / Musée des beaux-arts du Canada. It is apparently from a series of photos taken when the 100th were in Gibraltar. I had some correspondence (in 2009) with them, but the price they were asking for a copy of the photo, over $CDN 250, was beyond my means. They did say that this might be digitalized at some future time.

When the 100th were, in turn, posted to Malta, FBJ apparently purchased a commission as a captain in the 3rd (Prince of Wales) Dragoon Guards, a rather smart cavalry regiment, so the commission must have cost him a bit. The 3rd Dragoons had been in India since 1857 and the turnover of officers in 'better' regiments posted there was quite high. At about the same time SHL purchased a captaincy in the 8th Hussars (later Kings Royal Irish Hussars), which was also stationed in India. My clue to SHL having actually returned to India is a carte de visite (you can see it on Internet) taken by a Calcutta studio. in which he is wearing the uniform of the 8th.

They both seem to have resigned from the army, probably 'selling out' (which would have brought them a considerable sum of money for the time) in about 1864 and come to Uruguay at that time or soon after, though SHL's aunts believed that he was emigrating to New Zealand. Any clues as to why they decided to come here?

The Uruguayan government was actively promoting foreign, and especially British, immigration at the time and cheap land was offered. There had been an Uruguayan presence at the 1862 London Exhibition (not the famous one of 1851) with a government sponsored pamphlet being produced with the aim of attracting immigrants. No proof but SHL & FBJ may have been aware of this.

More precise details if you require them.

FBJ Married Alice Douglas of Buenos Aires on 16 August 1869.

http://www.argbrit.org/Declarations/declarations(4).htm

Some immediate questions I have:

I assume that it must have been FBJ who notified SHL's death to Britain. This was announced in the United Services Gazette in August 1868, that is a couple of months after it occurred and, allowing for the several weeks that it took ships to get to UK from the River Plate, someone must have been quick off the mark. I've had a look, not very thorough let it be said, at the correspondence of the British diplomatic representative, Maj. Monroe, with the Foreign Office but found nothing; he tended only to notify the, not infrequent, violent deaths of British subjects. As a retired military man, Maj. Monroe may have been the one who notified the USC. Is there anything in the family correspondence that might give an indication?


What were your sources for the idea that SHL might have been buried in the British Cemetery? More on my investigations in that direction if you are interested.

Have you located the house in south London which FBJ named 'Arazaty'?

Do you have a FBJ photograph of better quality than the one which appears in Priscilla's biography of Edward J.?

Can you give me the address of the calligraphers here in Uruguay who visited Arazatí? On my one visit, the family representative of the lumber company which owns a lot of the land around there, had no knowledge of the estancia owned by SHL and/or FBJ (I have no idea of the property/business details - any clues in the family letters?) I know a relative of the people who own the lumber company. Perhaps another trip on June 17th this year, 145th anniversary of SHL's death, is in order.

Did they send you photos of the estancia? I attached photos of the area from internet to the personal message I sent you, as I didn't have a digital camera when I visited. The beaches are on the River Plate, not the sea.


Best Wishes

Les Waring
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby ajohnston » 13 May 2013 12:48

Dear Les,

As I said, I am not familiar with how this sort of site/forum works, but do please have another go at e-mailing me on ajohnston8f@gmail.com. I can't imagine why it didn't work.

Yes, I could e-mail images: a very faint photo of FBJ in India, a watercolour of him in uniform (which I imagine you can identify?). There are lots of other family photos, less relevant. We have old photos of the estancia, looking very bleak - not an attractive building! Our contacts in Uruguay found the actual building in a derelict state and photographed every square inch of it in their excitement! It clearly wasn't the one you found, but I wonder if Major Lawrence may have been buried there , especially if he died of some frightful tropical disease - some haste might have been required in hot temperatures! I thought I got the information re. the British Cemetery from the Forum site: "Research at both Montevideo, including the British Cemetery which is often quoted as his burial place, and Arazati has, so far, failed to reveal his final resting place." In 1865 FBJ's godfearing older brother Andrew recorded: "At the end of the year my brother returned from India having sold out from the 3rd Dr. Gds and with a bad attack of dysentery on him."

Andrew later recorded in his journal: "In the Spring of 1866 he (i.e. FBJ) wearied of doing nothing in London and went out and took the sheep run of Arazaty Monte Video where he still is." (We had thought it was cattle.) We also have a photo of FBJ at what we assume is Arazaty - he looks rather swashbuckling with soft boots, baggy trousers and shirt, wide cummerbund, shaven head and beard. He looks a bit of a poser to me! We haven't persevered with finding "Arazaty" in Surrey - the full address was "Arazaty, Kenley, S.O., Surrey." I don't imagine it's of any interest - after their return in 1875 they had a unsettled existence, living in various rather undistinguished places. After the death of FBJ's wife Alice in 1891, he remarried quickly, abandoning his previous family - except for some rather tetchy correspondence with his son Edward. There are hardly any letters and no journals from him. The estancia seems to have been sold in 1902, not 1875 as Priscilla recorded in her book. We have some correspondence between FBJ and his son Edward on this.

I imagine expats went out to Uruguay as a land of opportunity perhaps. The Fray Bentos empire started in 1861 in Uruguay, I discovered. With the British Empire at its height I guess there would have been a lot of demand for canned meat for the huge colonial armies - ranching and farming might have been a more attractive option for a younger son than joining the stodgy ranks of family banks and businesses.

Do persevere with my e-mail and let me have yours, if that's O.K. I don't imagine the Forum wants to be cluttered up with all this! I can easily send scans of photos etc. I am e-mailing our friends in Uruguay and suggest they look at the Forum. Just as a courtesy I will ask if they mind me passing on their e-mail address to you. Maybe between you, you will find more answers!

Best wishes,
Angela
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 13 May 2013 17:23

Angela

Thanks for the reply, I’ll get back in touch with you via your private mail address, my original mail to you is registered on my computer as sent on 5 May, but not as having received an acknowledgement of receipt as requested.
I agree that our correspondence should continue by private mail, though there may be things of interest to members of the forum re FBJ’s military service in India and Gibraltar. Not that he seems to have been a distinguished soldier or even person, as even the family, with its staunch Quaker values, seems to have felt.

There are several members on the forum who could perhaps point us in the direction of information about the 8th Dragoons (King’s Irish) and 3rd Dragoon Guards in India during the early 1860s. Were they ever stationed near each other?
FBJ’s dysentry may be connected to Cholera, which was rife in India (and the World) during the period. If FBJ and/or SHL went to areas like the Terai, on the frontier between India and Nepal, noted for hunting, there were all sorts of unnamed diseases waiting there to catch both European and Indian. Dr (later Sir) Joseph Fayrer, one of the Lucknow ODs, spent his later career helping to deal with them.

In fact, the year that Sam Lawrence died (1868) there were outbreaks of both Cholera and Yellow Fever in the River Plate area, plus major political unrest, amounting virtually to civil war, in Uruguay. Not very propitious for moving a corpse around. Mulhall’s comment about Sam having died ‘from a disease contracted in India’ may be a distractor; he was, after all, in the business of trying to attract British settlers to the region.

It’s interesting that Edward Johnston should have turned out as something remarkable, though he was apparently on the same route to inconsequence as FBJ when he abandoned his medical studies. Nowadays, you can remember him every time you catch a bus or take the tube in London. His contribution to the design of the London transport roundel and the calligraphy which, in essence, is still used, is recognized worldwide. By the way, I believe I saw some kind of plaque or similar memorial to Edward in St James’ tube station. Can you confirm if there is one or whether I was hallucinating? Friends who’ve been there since have told me they could find nothing.

I’m getting off the military track, though a topic somewhere on the site about the distinguished non-military children of Victorian military men, distinguished or not, might be of interest. Will close here and get back to you by private mail.

Best wishes

Les W
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 17 May 2013 23:34

Angela

Today I sent three copies of my next mail to you.

One a PM from this site and 2 from my different e-mail accounts.

Hope at least one gets through. My least favourite for a reply is gmail.

Best wishes

Les W.
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Bowman » 21 Jun 2013 12:26

Hi Les

I have been doing some family research and have just joined this forum. I wonder if we might help each other with some information. I have been told by my late mother that my great great grandfather, a soldier recruited from Dublin, was killed during the Mutiny and his wife died in childbirth at the Residency during the siege. She thought his name was Charles Myers, however the only Myers killed in the Mutiny was a Thomas Myers, No. 2654, a private of the 32nd Foot, Killed in Action at Chinhat on 30/06/1857.
I have looked at the nominal roll from the London Gazette of 17 Feb 1858 which I found through this site and can find no mention of a Myers among the list of women present at the Residency. I do not know my great great grandmother's first name but I do know she was accompanied by 4 children .. 2 daughters and sons Frederick & Charles. I know Charles, my great great grandfather did survive.

cheers ...Rob Bowman
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 21 Jun 2013 20:02

Bowman wrote:Hi Les

I have been doing some family research and have just joined this forum. I wonder if we might help each other with some information. I have been told by my late mother that my great great grandfather, a soldier recruited from Dublin, was killed during the Mutiny and his wife died in childbirth at the Residency during the siege. She thought his name was Charles Myers, however the only Myers killed in the Mutiny was a Thomas Myers, No. 2654, a private of the 32nd Foot, Killed in Action at Chinhat on 30/06/1857.
I have looked at the nominal roll from the London Gazette of 17 Feb 1858 which I found through this site and can find no mention of a Myers among the list of women present at the Residency. I do not know my great great grandmother's first name but I do know she was accompanied by 4 children .. 2 daughters and sons Frederick & Charles. I know Charles, my great great grandfather did survive.

cheers ...Rob Bowman


Rob

Great to hear from you, especially as your enquiry relates to the 32nd and, especially, the women and children of the regiment. I'm very busy at present, this being near the end of my academic term, and will be in a better position to investigate more after next week. For the present.

1. I have Pte. Thomas Myers confirmed as k-i-a at Chinhut/Chinhat. Have you confirmed his regimental # from the muster roll or other source? I didn't have it.

2. As you probably know, Chinhat was fought on 30 June 1857 and as a result of it, those survivors of the British force which was routed there but who were lucky enough to get back to the Residency, were amongst the ODs of the Siege which began immediately following the Chinhat debacle. Thos. Myers was not one of the fortunate ones.

3. I've looked up my immediately available sources for the 32nd at that time and cannot find any other Myers with the regiment, not e.g. one of those massacred at Kanpur (Cawnpore).

4. It's not surprising that Mrs Myers and her children are not on the London Gazeette list. This, as far as military personnel was concerned, was an Officers and Ladies list. Although mere 'women' (and their children) were on the list, these were all civilians. Military 'ladies' are included, military 'women' are not. This was, after all, the Victorian era and it's very frustrating for those with the slightly more egalitarian outlook of a later age.

5. Do you have documentary proof of Mrs Myers' presence , with her children, as ODs? I'd very much like to add them to my data base as data about the 32nd's women and children is virtually non-existent, The regimental museum told me, several years ago, that there were no extant records of them. This was probably due to the viscisitudes of the campaign, the regiment seemed to take some care of them- there was a schoolmaster-sergeant, which not all units had at the time, and the CO's wife, Mrs (later Lady) Inglis seems to have paid particular attention to their welfare. Any idea about the names of the girls, the dates of birth and death of any of them?

6. If you can get to the National Archive at Kew, there are a few files that you might look up, I'll have to give you their numbers later

a.) the muster roll showing whether Myers (and his wife) were amongst the original members of the regiment which sailed from Cobh habour to India in 1846. The memoirs of Waterfield and Ryder, which I've mentioned before, have descriptions of the voyage and mention the birth of at least one child.

b) the ledgers detailing the payment of prize money for Lucknow, which was made some years after the event. I've seen the names of family members who received the payments due to dead soldiers . Alternatively, some prize money seems never to have been collected.

c) the medal roll file for the First Sikh War (Punjab Campaign) would reveal whether Myers was with the regiment in India in 1848-49. I'm having trouble retrieving my copy at present, but it's downloadable, free, from the NA website.

Will be back when I have more time to look closely at my materials.

Best Wishes

Les W.

'One and All'
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 21 Jun 2013 20:46

Rob

I've just looked up the NA file 100/106 where medals not collected by or presented to family members of soldiers and returned to the War Office, are listed. The 32nd Foot stated that the IMM due to Pte T. Myers, recorded as 'Dead', was returned. Not really surprising given that his wife was also dead and only young? children remained. The same could have happened to his prize money, though it would be worth checking.

I believe that medals could be claimed for a certain period after the award but eventually they were destroyed and no further claims were allowed. Perhaps some of the medal experts could clarify the situation on this.

Best

Les W.
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Bowman » 25 Jun 2013 12:44

Re. Myers

Les

the information I have is sadly only family recollections and we all know how they can get distorted. The story goes that my ancestor Myers (was he really called Charles as my mother says or was he Thomas? ... note: many people in my family were never called by their real name) was on a ship to India when the Mutiny broke out. I presume this was before the siege commenced. On arrival in India he was posted to his regiment & his wife went to the Residency. The regimental number of Thomas Myers was provided by Kevin Asplin, you may know of him. He is a serving member of the British army and an amateur historian (http://www.britishmedals.us/kevin/intro.html) (KevinAsplin@aol.com).

I know nothing of my great great grandmother's children except that she arrived in India with 2 girls and 2 boys, Frederick & Charles (my great grandfather). Charles died about 1895. One daughter married a Cox and the other a Brocken.

I live in Australia, however I do have a cousin in London who often goes to the National Archive in Kew so any information that she could pursue would be appreciated.

cheers

Rob
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Re: Original Defenders of Lucknow Residency 1 Jul-24 Sep 185

Postby Les Waring » 26 Jun 2013 13:35

Rob

Yes, I know of the work of Mr Asplin, which I have found very useful and reliable. When I started my data-base originally I didn't include those killed at Chinhut amongst the ODs, so didn't make a note of Pte. Myers' regimental number. Since I was out of line with everyone else (they were awarded the 'Defence of Lucknow' clasp to their IMMs, for example) I included them later but did not get round to adding most of the numbers.

From the information you give there seem to be a lot of questions and doubts about this case. As you mention, family memories can become very distorted over time. If your relative is very patient and willing to look at a number of dusty old documents at the NA (I certainly envy her) I will post a number of War Office (WO) file numbers which should give a clue to the whereabouts of Thomas Myers during the period in question. However, you'll have to wait until the weekend and the beginning of my winter vacation before I can consult my materials.

One glaring inconsistency in the story is that about Myers and his family being on the high seas when the Mutiny/Rebellion broke out and still being able to get through to Lucknow. I have read of no cases of this happening, Lucknow is hundreds of miles from the nearest port and, in mid-1857, this was decidedly hostile territory for Europeans, non-combatants were evacuated as far as possible (for many it wasn't and they died), not moved into the area.

The idea that Myers, either a recent recruit or a sick/wounded man who had been sent back to Britain to recover, would be accompanied by his whole family on a 'return' to India sounds highly improbable, even whole regiments embarking for overseas service, as the 32nd had done in 1846, were allowed only a very small number of accompanying family members (chosen by lottery.) It was very expensive to travel to India, far beyond the means of most private soldiers with families to pay their own way.

I'll be back as soon as possible.

Best Wishes.

Les W.
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