Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

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Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby Atheling » 28 Apr 2015 21:19

hi all,

I have read a little on The Mutiny; I basically have John France's book published by foundry and a couple of others but I was wondering if members could steer me towards what they would personally as essential reading, especially for Havelock's operations, The Siege of Delhi and Sir Colin Campbell's operations at the Second Relief of Lucknow (in other words the campaigns that Mike's new adventure into the world of wargaming Indian Mutiny range will cover)?

Darrell.
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby mike snook » 29 Apr 2015 00:08

Give me a few days Darrell and I'll stick some recommended reading up on the Iron Duke website, (which should not prevent anybody else chipping in here with recommendations in the meantime.....)

Best wishes

Mike
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby Atheling » 29 Apr 2015 00:27

mike snook wrote:Give me a few days Darrell and I'll stick some recommended reading up on the Iron Duke website, (which should not prevent anybody else chipping in here with recommendations in the meantime.....)

Best wishes

Mike


Ah, that's great :) .

Looking forward to it- there's quite a lot of literature out there but it's really a case of knowing what would be useful for the campaigns you've designed the range around and what would not.

Thanks Mike.

Darrell.
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby Atheling » 02 May 2015 04:50

Mike,

Although it's a work in process it is very much an extensive list it would be a dereliction for me not to recommend the uniform guide to other members of this forum whether they are wargamers or not:

http://www.irondukeminiatures.co.uk/uniforms-etc

Just out of interest Mike, how do you rate the John French book published by Foundry in terms of the information it contains on uniforms? I ask as this is at present, you website excluded, my primary source of information regarding the Mutiny.

Regards,
Darrell.
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby mike snook » 02 May 2015 11:02

Darrell

I think quite highly of it, though there are, as perhaps one might reasonably expect, things with which I do not agree. Most notably the portrayal of the 78th Highlanders after the Desanges paintings is wrong. Col (at the time Capt) Francis Maude RA VC, who was there, states emphatically in his memoirs that, 'kilts were not worn'. The tartan, which might conceivably have been worn by some officers in the form of trews, was Seaforth of Mackenzie. French states Cameron.

It is, however, a hugely difficult area. I like to say that 'the answer is always out there', but Mutiny uniforms is an area where this is not invariably true. People were irritatingly bad at recording dress in their memoirs. The best you get is fleeting references and one liners. So you have to work across a vast array of sources, even to begin to cobble together any sort of wider picture. Then you come to direct contradictions, which are particularly annoying and not infrequently drive you back to square one.

Art work is often a red herring, as with Desanges. Crealock,(later Lord Chelmsford's military secretary in Zululand) obnoxious as he was, was at least a talented artist and present during the Mutiny, but only for the Central India campaign of 1858, not for the better known events of 1857. He is one of few authentic sources. One even has to be careful with Atkinson who was there at Delhi. For example I have seen a portrayal by him of an incident in which a mutineer stuck his head out of a window only to be grabbed by the hair and chopped with a kukri by a Gurkha. In one edition the Gurkha, who is wearing a tunic, is shown head to foot, including his forage cap, in a golden colour of khaki. But one of the secrets of getting to the bottom of it all is knowing what the original item of dress actually is. Well in this instance the forage cap was rifle green: it is simply impossible to dye a 'rifle green' (loitering close towards black) hat to a golden yellow. So there's your first clue: this might be an Atkinson but it has to be wrong. Sure enough I've also seen the same Atkinson coloured completely differently. In the second version the hat and tunic are indeed rifle green and the trousers grey! But the uninitiated or less painstaking might die in a ditch defending the notion that the Kumaon Gurkhas were definitely clad from head to foot in golden yellow khaki. One of the things I am playing around with at the moment is that the Atkinson portrayal of the 75th attacking at Badli-ke-Serai isn't the 75th at all, but rather 1st Bengal Fusiliers who also, (little known fact), attacked at Badli-ke-Serai on the flank of the 75th. Atkinson portrayed the fusiliers over and over again, but apparently he suddenly felt moved to take in the 75th. Not so sure actually. But importantly I can't prove it - so that needs to be stated up front, (as I now have).

Then one has to consider the seasons; another complicating factor. It was obnoxiously hot in the summer. If you flew to India today and got off the plane in the winter you probably wouldn't notice it was winter. But I can say of my own experience of living in hot climates for extended periods that your body gradually adjusts to local conditions. Thus in your first winter you might think the locals are being a bit cissy about the drop in temperature, but in your second winter, you will feel it as badly as they do. So there were summer and winter orders of dress. The former was white. The latter home service dress. The Mutiny of course straddles both. I can't immediately think of a set of memoirs which says in the summer we wore precisely this, and on such such a date regimental orders said we should change to precisely that. Fortunately I happen to know that the date of change was typically about October. Well that's all well and good, except for then you have to be sure which regiments actually had access to their baggage/home station and which did not! For example the people who relieved Lucknow in September and remained there until November, when Campbell came, had nothing but the clothes on their backs when they passed through the Ballie Guard gate. (Cor they must have been ripe smelling by November, poor devils!).

Then you have the China Expedition factor, four or five regiments with a combination of their own special 'brown holland' uniform, with home service uniform in their kits. You can get (as I have) to the point that you know they have forage caps and shakos both with white covers, in their kits. But which did they wear in and around Lucknow? Did they all wear the same thing? Were they a complete mish mash, one regiment doing one thing, and another regiment doing another? If so, which regiment did what?

That leads fairly nicely into the whole issue of perpetuating the myth. That goes on a lot. One illustrator, or more accurately the historian behind him, takes a guess. The next thing you know the guess has been repeated three or four times across several different art forms (including by other illustrators) as if it were 'gospel'. A good example of this had been played through here: one of Barthorp's books for Osprey included a plate showing the 91st Highlanders in South Africa. It's an interesting and different looking order of dress: so it has been copied, to my certain knowledge at least four times, by makers of larger scale model soldiers. It features a curious bonnet with a diced band (which I happen to know on the basis of an eyewitness watercolour was indeed worn by the 72nd Highlanders in South Africa more than a decade earlier). So the guys I feel sorry for are not so much the makers of the model soldiers, but those wonderfully artistic people who sit down for months on end to paint them to such extraordinary standards, on the assumption, (to which they are entitled, having parted with good money), that they are historically correct. The diced band would be particularly fussy and difficult to paint as you well know. Then they enter them into competitions and all the rest of it - people are amazed by their talent; other people agonize over judging the competition - and so on. All well and good....except that the start point is completely wrong. The 91st didn't have any Scottish features to their dress at that time at all. The illustration is spurious, the models are spurious and that would be heartbreaking to the people who spent so much time trying so hard to get something right which never existed in history. So that's a long winded explanation of perpetuating the myth. The movie Zulu is the all time villain of all time in that regard. No matter how hard those of us who (foolishly) pick up the pen try, we can never defeat the mass mythology perpetrated at every turn by those who make films. That is all the more lamentable an occurrence when the real history is actually much more dramatic than any feeble screen portrayal (vide Rorke's Drift/'Zulu' and Isandlwana/'Zulu Dawn').

So back to where we started. Mutiny dress is an exceptionally wooly area to begin with. Even to get close one has to work really hard. John French succeeded is getting close and must by definition have done a great deal of work to get there, so I admire the effort he made. He is mostly but not invariably right, but he also get things wrong: vide 78th Hldrs, as earlier described. Sometimes, when agonizing over some obscure issue, I ask myself does it really matter? Does anybody apart from me care? But the answer is always the same. Yes it does matter and yes there are people who care. I am presently reassembling the Battle of Berea. It's not easy, but British and Basotho boys died that day (20 Dec 1852), because it was their duty to do so, and we owe it to them to be able to say 'this is what happened and where I am pointing now is where it happened.' That is important and when we stop believing that, I fear we will have made the final plunge into philistinism. On the Mutiny I do what I can, but there will be areas where I am wrong too. At least nobody will be able to say 'he didn't try'. I can see that John French tried, so yes I endorse his book (but not its every detail).

As ever

Mike
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby rd72 » 02 May 2015 17:42

Mike,

I may have grey hair (well, more of it) and walk with a cane, but I will be around to read your volume on the Mutiny..... You bring an element of detail in kit, tactics and ground that is indeed quite rare, and, in my mind, only shared by a select "one or two" of your peers. Thank you.

*Gushing Ends*
Cheers,
Rob
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby Frogsmile » 02 May 2015 20:30

mike snook wrote:Darrell

I think quite highly of it, though there are, as perhaps one might reasonably expect, things with which I do not agree. Most notably the portrayal of the 78th Highlanders after the Desanges paintings is wrong. Col (at the time Capt) Francis Maude RA VC, who was there, states emphatically in his memoirs that, 'kilts were not worn'. The tartan, which might conceivably have been worn by some officers in the form of trews, was Seaforth of Mackenzie. French states Cameron.

It is, however, a hugely difficult area. I like to say that 'the answer is always out there', but Mutiny uniforms is an area where this is not invariably true. People were irritatingly bad at recording dress in their memoirs. The best you get is fleeting references and one liners. So you have to work across a vast array of sources, even to begin to cobble together any sort of wider picture. Then you come to direct contradictions, which are particularly annoying and not infrequently drive you back to square one.

Art work is often a red herring, as with Desanges. Crealock,(later Lord Chelmsford's military secretary in Zululand) obnoxious as he was, was at least a talented artist and present during the Mutiny, but only for the Central India campaign of 1858, not for the better known events of 1857. He is one of few authentic sources. One even has to be careful with Atkinson who was there at Delhi. For example I have seen a portrayal by him of an incident in which a mutineer stuck his head out of a window only to be grabbed by the hair and chopped with a kukri by a Gurkha. In one edition the Gurkha, who is wearing a tunic, is shown head to foot, including his forage cap, in a golden colour of khaki. But one of the secrets of getting to the bottom of it all is knowing what the original item of dress actually is. Well in this instance the forage cap was rifle green: it is simply impossible to dye a 'rifle green' (loitering close towards black) hat to a golden yellow. So there's your first clue: this might be an Atkinson but it has to be wrong. Sure enough I've also seen the same Atkinson coloured completely differently. In the second version the hat and tunic are indeed rifle green and the trousers grey! But the uninitiated or less painstaking might die in a ditch defending the notion that the Kumaon Gurkhas were definitely clad from head to foot in golden yellow khaki. One of the things I am playing around with at the moment is that the Atkinson portrayal of the 75th attacking at Badli-ke-Serai isn't the 75th at all, but rather 1st Bengal Fusiliers who also, (little known fact), attacked at Badli-ke-Serai on the flank of the 75th. Atkinson portrayed the fusiliers over and over again, but apparently he suddenly felt moved to take in the 75th. Not so sure actually. But importantly I can't prove it - so that needs to be stated up front, (as I now have).

Then one has to consider the seasons; another complicating factor. It was obnoxiously hot in the summer. If you flew to India today and got off the plane in the winter you probably wouldn't notice it was winter. But I can say of my own experience of living in hot climates for extended periods that your body gradually adjusts to local conditions. Thus in your first winter you might think the locals are being a bit cissy about the drop in temperature, but in your second winter, you will feel it as badly as they do. So there were summer and winter orders of dress. The former was white. The latter home service dress. The Mutiny of course straddles both. I can't immediately think of a set of memoirs which says in the summer we wore precisely this, and on such such a date regimental orders said we should change to precisely that. Fortunately I happen to know that the date of change was typically about October. Well that's all well and good, except for then you have to be sure which regiments actually had access to their baggage/home station and which did not! For example the people who relieved Lucknow in September and remained there until November, when Campbell came, had nothing but the clothes on their backs when they passed through the Ballie Guard gate. (Cor they must have been ripe smelling by November, poor devils!).

Then you have the China Expedition factor, four or five regiments with a combination of their own special 'brown holland' uniform, with home service uniform in their kits. You can get (as I have) to the point that you know they have forage caps and shakos both with white covers, in their kits. But which did they wear in and around Lucknow? Did they all wear the same thing? Were they a complete mish mash, one regiment doing one thing, and another regiment doing another? If so, which regiment did what?

That leads fairly nicely into the whole issue of perpetuating the myth. That goes on a lot. One illustrator, or more accurately the historian behind him, takes a guess. The next thing you know the guess has been repeated three or four times across several different art forms (including by other illustrators) as if it were 'gospel'. A good example of this had been played through here: one of Barthorp's books for Osprey included a plate showing the 91st Highlanders in South Africa. It's an interesting and different looking order of dress: so it has been copied, to my certain knowledge at least four times, by makers of larger scale model soldiers. It features a curious bonnet with a diced band (which I happen to know on the basis of an eyewitness watercolour was indeed worn by the 72nd Highlanders in South Africa more than a decade earlier). So the guys I feel sorry for are not so much the makers of the model soldiers, but those wonderfully artistic people who sit down for months on end to paint them to such extraordinary standards, on the assumption, (to which they are entitled, having parted with good money), that they are historically correct. The diced band would be particularly fussy and difficult to paint as you well know. Then they enter them into competitions and all the rest of it - people are amazed by their talent; other people agonize over judging the competition - and so on. All well and good....except that the start point is completely wrong. The 91st didn't have any Scottish features to their dress at that time at all. The illustration is spurious, the models are spurious and that would be heartbreaking to the people who spent so much time trying so hard to get something right which never existed in history. So that's a long winded explanation of perpetuating the myth. The movie Zulu is the all time villain of all time in that regard. No matter how hard those of us who (foolishly) pick up the pen try, we can never defeat the mass mythology perpetrated at every turn by those who make films. That is all the more lamentable an occurrence when the real history is actually much more dramatic than any feeble screen portrayal (vide Rorke's Drift/'Zulu' and Isandlwana/'Zulu Dawn').

So back to where we started. Mutiny dress is an exceptionally wooly area to begin with. Even to get close one has to work really hard. John French succeeded is getting close and must by definition have done a great deal of work to get there, so I admire the effort he made. He is mostly but not invariably right, but he also get things wrong: vide 78th Hldrs, as earlier described. Sometimes, when agonizing over some obscure issue, I ask myself does it really matter? Does anybody apart from me care? But the answer is always the same. Yes it does matter and yes there are people who care. I am presently reassembling the Battle of Berea. It's not easy, but British and Basotho boys died that day (20 Dec 1852), because it was their duty to do so, and we owe it to them to be able to say 'this is what happened and where I am pointing now is where it happened.' That is important and when we stop believing that, I fear we will have made the final plunge into philistinism. On the Mutiny I do what I can, but there will be areas where I am wrong too. At least nobody will be able to say 'he didn't try'. I can see that John French tried, so yes I endorse his book (but not its every detail).

As ever

Mike


Extremely interesting post Mike, especially your efforts to achieve authentic dress details, an aspect that has always been at the centre of my interests. It's only been in the last decade or so that I have understood more fully how various battalions were often dressed differently in the same action for a myriad of reasons.
More strength to your elbow, as used to be said.
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby mike snook » 02 May 2015 23:06

Thanks chaps: too kind.

We all do what we can and I am keenly aware of the huge contribution both of you make in the pages of this forum. Your knowledge is hugely impressive. So more power to your respective elbows too. It doesn't matter how old we get Rob; I'm sure there will be young ones coming along nicely to continue the effort long after we're gone. Some of them are here.

Yes. India. We'll have to see what we can do. I have to find a way of getting sponsored there. And I've got a ton more to write up about Africa first. Better get on; time waits for no man as they say!

As ever,

Mike
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby rd72 » 03 May 2015 00:18

Mike,

After re-reading my comment, I just wanted to confirm that my emphasis was on the fact that I would wait and age and then some, staving off a glorious immortality, to read your book, rather than the possibility that you would take an age to write it!!!!!

Looking forward to "Africa"...
Cheers,
Rob
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby Atheling » 03 May 2015 08:26

Thank you for answering the question so promptly and in such detail Mike- very good of you :) .

I think that one thing that I can take away from this is that many things are not certain and that research is going to be a biggie.

The other is that I'll be watching the uniform section of the Iron Duke site like a hawk!!

I'm about to prep some of the Indian Mutiny mini's, I got distracted yesterday so I should have something to post quite soon.

Thank you again- your contribution to the forum is mammoth in proportions and your knowledge of the various subjects re: Late Victorian warfare is particularly awesome!

Darrell.
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby johnpreece » 16 Jul 2015 12:39

I have found that when reading about the Peninsular Wars I came back again and again to Oman's list of books organised by Regiment. I have made a tentative stab at starting the same for the Mutiny. I have gone through Richard Sorsky's bibliography and abstracted those books that are clearly written by members of the Regt at that time. I have also put an internet link where I have found a free online copy. An asterisk denotes that I have made a cursory search for an online copy but drawn a blank.

The limits of this list are many. I have not attempted to begin to tackle the many Bengal Army Officers who were presumably attached in different places. I have certainly not done justice to many units especially the Royal Engineers. But it is at least a start.

I do not think there is much on offer for the serious student of the Indian Mutiny here, but thinking especially of those painting up the Iron Duke figures in months to come I have copied it here.

John


9th Lancers
Anson Harcourt S. With HM 9th Lancers During the Indian Mutiny: the letters of brevet-major
Octavius Henry S G Anson London 1896.
https://archive.org/details/withhm9thlancers00ansorich

Ouvry Henry A Cavalry Experiences and Leaves from my Journal
Col. Lymington(Canada?) 1892 privately printed. Journal and letters.
https://archive.org/details/cavalryexperien00ouvrgoog

14th Light Dragoons
Stent George Scraps from my Sabretasche, being personal adventures while in the 14th
Carter Light Dragoons London 1882
https://archive.org/details/scrapsfrommysab00stengoog

A McKenzie Annand Ed. Cavalry Surgeon: Recollections of John Henry Sylvester
MacMillan 1971

Sylvester J H Recollections of the Campaign in Malwa and Central India under Major
Assistant Surgeon General Sir Hugh Rose Bombay 1860
https://archive.org/details/recollectionsca01sylvgoog

17th Lancers
Evelyn Wood VC From Midshipman to Field Marshall
Field Marshall 1906 Vol 1 pp 118-163
https://archive.org/details/frommidshipmant01woodgoog

Royal Artillery
Lieut Majendie V D Up Among The Pandies London 1859
https://archive.org/details/upamongpandieso00majegoog

Royal Engineers
Fulton G W W Biographical Memoirs with private journal of the siege of Lucknow.
Captain Lucknow August 5- Sept 14. New Zealand 1913. *

Harrison Richard Recollections of a life in the British Army During the latter half of the 19C.
General Sir London 1908. Royal Engineer.
https://archive.org/details/recollectionsofl00harrrich

Innes Lieut John James Macleod Rough Narrative of the Siege of Lucknow Calcutta 1857 *

Lucknow and Oude in the Mutiny, a Narrative and Study. 1895
http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/009789016

5th Northumberland Fusiliers
Danvers Robert Letters from India and China 1854- 58
William. London 1898 70th NI Attached as interpreter to 5th from July 57.
https://archive.org/details/cu31924023223872

Thornton James Howard Memories of Seven Campaigns 1895 Surgeon attached 5th.
https://archive.org/details/memoriesofsevenc00thor

7th Royal Fusiliers
Gowing T. Sgt Major. A Soldiers experience or a Voice from the Ranks. 1889 Nottingham
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/46989

8th Kings
Robertson A C Memorials of General Sir Edward Harris Greathed. 1858 (Col. 8th foot) *

10th North Lincolnshire
Caine Rev, Barracks and Battlefields in India: Experiences of a soldier of the 10th foot in the Sikh wars
Caeser and Mutiny. (Thomas Malcolm) .York and London 1891 *?

Gordon Sir C A Surgeon General Recollections of 39 years in the Army. London 1898 *

23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers
Ward Beatrice ed. Letters of Edwin Utterton from the Crimea and Indian Mutiny. 1964 *

31st Huntingdonshire
Inge Dennison A Subalterns Diary. Consisting of scraps from 17 years of a subalterns life at
M Lt Col home and abroad in the 31st regt, 8th Hussars and Iniskilling dragoons. 1894 *

32nd Cornwall
Lowe E Delaney Letters from Lucknow and Cawnpore Greenwich 1858. *

Tuker LtGen Sir F Ed. The Chronicle of Private Henry Metcalfe London 1953

42nd Royal Highland
Robb Alexander Reminiscences of a Veteran: Being the experiences of a private soldier in the
Private Crimea and during the Indian Mutiny Dundee 1888 *

52nd Oxfordshire Light Infantry
Bayley John Arthur Reminiscences of School and Army life 1839-1859
privately printed London 1875
http://www.archive.org/stream/reminisce ... 4/mode/2up

Bayley Beginning of the Indian Mutiny.
Major John Arthur In: Oxfordshire Light Infantry Chronicle Vol. XIV 20pp 1905. *

Wilberforce Reginald Garton An Unrecorded Chapter of the Indian Mutiny. 1894
http://www.archive.org/stream/cu3192407 ... 9/mode/2up

60th Rifles
North Charles Napier Major Journal of an English Officer in India London 1858
https://archive.org/details/journalanenglis00nortgoog

61st Foot South Gloucester
Griffiths Capt John Charles A Narrative of the Siege of Delhi. London 1910
https://archive.org/details/narrativeofsiege00grifiala

64th North Staffordshire
McKenzie Thomas My Life as a Soldier
Captain Canada 1898 (served in Persia with 64th? Ranker/bugler?)
https://archive.org/details/mylifeassoldier00mckeuoft

71st Highland Light Infantry
John Watt A Private Soldiers Journal in Central India
Private In JRUSI Feb 1952 8pp. * (Oates LB ed.)

75th Gordon Highlanders
Barter Richard The Siege of Delhi: mutiny memories of an old officer. Folio Society 1984

90th light infantry Perthshire
Home Anthony Service Memories
Dickson Sir London 1912 Surgeon with 90th at Lucknow. *

Wolseley Garnet Story of a Soldiers Life 1903 Vol 1 pp240 -390.
Viscount Field Marshall
https://archive.org/details/storyasoldiersl00wolsgoog

93rd Sutherland Highlanders
Ewing J A Story of a Soldiers life in Peace War and Mutiny. 2 vols. London 1881.
https://archive.org/details/storyasoldiersl00ewargoog

Forbes-Mitchell Reminiscences of the Great Mutiny.
Sgt. William London 1893. Folio Society ed. 1962

Gordon-Alexander Recollections of a Highland Subaltern during the campaigns of the 93rd
Lieut Col W Highlanders in India under Colin Campbell Lord Clyde 1857, 58, 59. London 1898 *

Munro William Records of Service and Campaigning in Many Lands 1887
Surgeon General 2 vols. Vol 2 deals with Mutiny Regt Surgeon with 93rd 1854-66
https://archive.org/details/recordsservicea01munrgoog vol 2

Reminiscences Of Military Service with the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders 1883
http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=u ... =1up;seq=7

95th Derbyshire
Raines Julius General Sir The 95th (The Derbyshire) Regiment in Central India 1900 (history?)*

Naval Brigade.
Jones Oliver John Captain RN Recollections of a Winters Campaign in India 1857-58. 1859
http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100568645

Montagu Victor Alexander Middy's Recollections 1853-60 . 1898 Served with the Pearl *

Verney Edmund Hope Lt The Shannon's Brigade in India. 1862
https://books.google.com.au/books?id=A7 ... &q&f=false

Watson Edward Spencer Journal India with HMS Shannon Naval Brigade from 8 August 1857.*

Williams Edward The Cruise of the |Pearl Round the World. With an account of the Naval
Adams Rev. Brigade in India London 1859 *

1st Madras Fusiliers
Owen Arthur Recollections of a veteran of the days of the Great Indian Mutiny of 1857 Private Lucknow 1916 *

Parry Sidney Henry Jones Captain An Old Soldiers Memories London 1897
https://archive.org/details/anoldsoldiersme00parrgoog

Gurkha Regts.
Reid Charles Extracts from Letters, Notes written during the Siege of |Delhi in 1857.
Colonel London *
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby Atheling » 16 Jul 2015 14:10

Wow! Thanks John......

I don't know where to start!

Many, many thanks,
Darrell.
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby johnpreece » 21 Jul 2015 21:59

This is quite a fun page. The nearest thing to finding a dusty bookshop in the lanes of an English market town that the Internet can offer.

https://archive.org/details/texts?and%5 ... ads&page=1

I would like to thank Maureene for introducing me to the entirely new (to me) world of internet library collections. It is astonishing and very rewarding though time consuming.

John
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Re: Essential Reading on the Mutiny?

Postby Atheling » 25 Jul 2015 12:56

johnpreece wrote:This is quite a fun page. The nearest thing to finding a dusty bookshop in the lanes of an English market town that the Internet can offer.

https://archive.org/details/texts?and%5 ... ads&page=1

I would like to thank Maureene for introducing me to the entirely new (to me) world of internet library collections. It is astonishing and very rewarding though time consuming.

John


Thanks John 8)

Darrell.
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