Patrol Jackets

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Patrol Jackets

Postby colsjt65 » 12 Aug 2012 23:37

I have a question about patrol jackets - Frogsmile, you said:
The Patrol Jacket was first introduced in 1864 (1868 in the infantry).
I find no reference to it in DR 1864 (available at Google Books). Do you have the write-up from the first time it appears in DR? I need to include in my book.
I can vaguely recall reading somewhere that DR often just formalised something that officers had already started wearing. My real question, I guess, is - when did officers REALLY start wearing the blue patrol jacket? I have evidence of officers wearing it in New Zealand before 1864.
Here is Capt. Henry Mercer RA, who died 25 Nov. 1863.
Mercer_TP.jpg
Mercer_TP.jpg (21.36 KiB) Viewed 5618 times


Also, this officer in a photo of officers and men with General Cameron taken at Gate Pa in April 1864.
officer-patrol jacket w cameron.jpg
officer-patrol jacket w cameron.jpg (180.94 KiB) Viewed 5549 times


I also have numerous photos of infantry officers, some who left NZ in 1866-7 wearing patrols - possibly, but not likely taken back in UK, for example:
Officers12th_Ozbook_AKLib sm.jpg
Officers12th_Ozbook_AKLib sm.jpg (54.18 KiB) Viewed 5618 times

The 12th departed May 1867.

Any help much appreciated.
Last edited by colsjt65 on 16 Aug 2012 11:32, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby Isandlwana » 13 Aug 2012 22:20

Colsjt65,

I can solve the first image for you and put you out of your misery.

The R.A. officer is not wearing a Patrol Jacket. He actually wearing the 1855 Pattern Artillery Officer's Frock Coat. The Frock Coat was:
Dark blue cloth, with collar rounded in front and edged with black mohair square cord, six loops of black mohair square cord, and six olivets in front of the coat on the breast, and terminating with crow's feet.


In 1864 by virtue of Dress Regulations for the Royal Artillery the Frock Coat was abolished in favour of the Patrol Jacket, for all with the exception of Regimental Colonels.

Without seeing the officer in the 2nd photograph in full-length, it is feasible he might also be wearing the Frock Coat as he also appears to be R.A.

As to the officers of the 12th their patrol jackets appear to be pattern which does not conform to Dress Regulations, it may be of local manufacture.

John
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with brave men's blood for England's sake and duty...
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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby Frogsmile » 14 Aug 2012 16:38

Colsjt65,
Sorry for the delay in my reply, I have only just seen your post. I obtained my information regarding the official introduction of the Patrol Jacket largely from two literary sources, Michael Barthorp's Uniforms of the British Infantry since 1660 and the Thin Red Line by the Fostens. This was then further backed up by the book dress of the Royal Artillery regarding the 1864 date.
As regards the 12th Foot, it seems quite feasible that some regiments unilaterally wore the jacket before 1868, as it was a type of upper garment that was becoming a trend at that time in many of the Empire's uniformed institutions. A quick look at the various Cutter's Guides of the period bears this out. It was later adopted in the US military and widely in European Armies too.
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FS
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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby colsjt65 » 16 Aug 2012 11:46

Thanks Isandlwana. I re-read the DR 1857 and see that it's describing the RA Frock. I didn't recognise it from the description.

But I've updated the photo in my first post of the officer at Gate Pa to show more of him and it does look like a patrol.

Frogsmile, you're right. Those 'patrol jackets' do look non-regulation. I have collected a boggling array of photos of officers in all sorts of fatigue jackets, local manufacture - blue, of course, not red, here in New Zealand, as well as blue infantry patrols which may or may not be taken in NZ in 1866, but may be taken after they returned to UK. The only British regiment still in NZ after early 1867 was the 18th Royal Irish, any many of them are in patrols. The Royal Irish left in 1870.

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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby Frogsmile » 17 Aug 2012 10:43

colsjt65 wrote:Thanks Isandlwana. I re-read the DR 1857 and see that it's describing the RA Frock. I didn't recognise it from the description.

But I've updated the photo in my first post of the officer at Gate Pa to show more of him and it does look like a patrol.

Frogsmile, you're right. Those 'patrol jackets' do look non-regulation. I have collected a boggling array of photos of officers in all sorts of fatigue jackets, local manufacture - blue, of course, not red, here in New Zealand, as well as blue infantry patrols which may or may not be taken in NZ in 1866, but may be taken after they returned to UK. The only British regiment still in NZ after early 1867 was the 18th Royal Irish, any many of them are in patrols. The Royal Irish left in 1870.

Cheers


That is very interesting. Undress upper garments do fascinate me, especially Patrol Jackets and they are very poorly documented outside of articles in member only institutions like the JSAHR. I cannot think of single book on uniforms that focuses specifically on undress uniforms. There were such a wide variety and the Patrol Jackets and later Serge Frocks with chest pockets worn by ORs are even less well known than those worn by officers.
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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby Isandlwana » 24 Aug 2012 23:22

I thought I'd throw these two into the topic, as one shows the 1864 Pattern R.A. Patrol Jacket and the other a variation worn by the Ordnance Store Department.

Image
The then Lt. Stuart Smith, R.H.A.

Image
Charles Wainwright, O.S.D.

I'll add some images of officers of the 57th (West Middlesex) Regiment relating to the campaign in New Zealand in another topic.

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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby Pgeddes » 01 Sep 2012 06:52

Bruce,

As has been pointed out already, the jackets worn by the 12th Foot officers in your photo may be a non regulation pattern, so this may be a somewhat academic observation to make. Still, just in case it throws any light on the matter at hand, I would tentatively identify the officers in the photo (based largely on another photo I have, taken at Raglan Barracks in 1869) as, left to right, Lt. Cutbill, Lt. Brittain, Captain O'Shaunessy, ? and Major Vereker. Vereker is not shown in the 1869 photo but is mentioned as serving in New Zealand in the 1867 Hart's list so my identification is an assumption based on the fact that the officer on the right appears to be considerably older than the others. There were other officers though who served in New Zealand in 1860-61 who were captains in 1867 so the right hand figure could conceiveably be one of them rather than Vereker.
Here is the 1869 photo, taken some time in the first quarter of that year, judging by some of the officers shown:
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b73/C ... 1867-9.jpg

Lt. Britain and Captain O'Shaunessy both served in New Zealand between 1863 and 1866 and Major Vereker served in New Zealand between 1862 and 1865. Harts does not mention when Cutbill was in New Zealand. Therefore, if my identification of the men pictured is correct, the photo was presumably taken between 1863 and 1865, possibly following a victorious campaign during this period as both Lt. Cutbill (?) and the officer seated on the floor fourth from the right (who appears in the 1869 photo standing to the right on the stairs but is not named) are both holding what appear to be captured taiahas (these being weapons reserved for Maori chiefs and therefore valuable war trophies).
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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby Pgeddes » 01 Sep 2012 16:40

For the origins of the patrol jacket, I did a bit of blue sky thinking, which I expect will be instantly shot down by those better informed than me. The blue jacket for infantry officers seems a radical departure from the scarlet normally worn, so there should be some valid reason for the adoption of blue as an officer's colour. If, as has been suggested already, the patrol jacket was a formalisation into regulations of something officers were already commonly wearing, I wonder if it could originally have had anything to with the fact that officers generally travelled mounted. Fenton's 1855 Crimea photos show what appear to be patrol jackets being worn by some cavalry officers and the Osprey book on the Crimea states that these were introduced in 1855. I wonder if some infantry officers took to wearing the cavalry patrol jacket or jackets similar to this as unofficial undress items in imitation of cavalry officers, the length of the patrol jacket being far more similar to that of an infantry tunic than either a cavalry shell jacket or frock coat, and then this caught on as a fashion. The practice of adopting the patrol jacket could possibly have started in the Royal Engineers, whose officers would have trained at the RMA at Woolwich Arsenal alongside artillery officers who would have then have moved into uniforms very similar to those of cavalry, and who they may have stayed in contact with. Were the 1866 regulations therefore authorising infantry officers to wear a cavalry item many were already wearing, along with standardising something which was already spreading into disparate patterns?
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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby colsjt65 » 02 Sep 2012 08:24

The caption for the photo says -
Tauranga, 1866. L to R - Capt. O'Shaughnessy, Lieut. Foster, Surgeon Manley V.C., Lieut. Triphook, Quarter Master Laver. Auckland Public Library.
I love that photo in the link! Thanks for sharing. That one's going straight to the pool-room! They are all wearing regulation Patrol Jackets. It should help me identify some more of them.

Yep, looks like the 1-12th made up their own version while in NZ.

Lieut. Henry D. Alfred Cutbill arrived in New Zealand aboard HMSS Curaçoa [2 Oct 1863], Reported to be leaving New Zealand from Wellington - "to join the Panama steamer, en route for England" Hawkes Bay Herald 1 June 1867.

Tell you what P. - I'll send you my notes for the 12th -inc all the officers' bios and photos I have, if you like.
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Re: Patrol Jackets

Postby Pgeddes » 03 Sep 2012 01:21

Thanks Bruce,
O'Shaunessy had actually been my original guess for the left hand officer but I changed my mind based on the line of the beard. I should have stayed with my first choice. It did not occur to me that the older officer might have been Laver - of course by the time the Devonport photo was taken he had been replaced by QM Muir.
Be a little bit careful of taking some of the identifications on the Devonport photo as gospel. The photo must have been taken between January and March 1869, as Ens. Townley did not join the battalion until January 1869. However, whoever wrote in the officers' names clearly did not know this and simply dated it to within the entire period spent at that location, suggesting it was annotated some years later. Several of the identification are insecure as well, with the annotator clearly not sure and having placed question marks next to them. Therefore some of these names may have been matched up with the wrong men and it would have to be checked against other photos. Two officers and the boy are ignored and two other officers, including Triphook, are simply marked with question marks, suggesting the photo was not annotated until some time after he had left the battalion, whenever that was.

Thanks for your offer. I would appreciate that very much. I will send you a PM.

Meanwhile, this post has been decidedly OT for this thread so I think we should return to the subject of patrol jackets.

Paul
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